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Diving into Photoshop Filters

Lesson 10 of 12

Distorting an Image to Make it Look Like a Real Photo Print

 

Diving into Photoshop Filters

Lesson 10 of 12

Distorting an Image to Make it Look Like a Real Photo Print

 

Lesson Info

Distorting an Image to Make it Look Like a Real Photo Print

Okay, Next, we're going to take this image, and we're going to turn it into, like, a little photo print and then put it into this image on the desk and give it kind of a little so it looks like it's a little bent or curved. I guess I should say so. First thing we're gonna do is grab our crop tool and we'll just use a free crop. So I'm gonna use the width and height, resolution and everything blank and, um, we will click, and I'm gonna hold down option to pull. So it's pulling from all four corners at the same time. And I just want to extend the canvas enough to add a little border like that. So will commit that. And then all command click to add a layer below and do my keyboard shortcut to fill with my current background color, which is white. And, um, I mean, emerge those two layers together now. So I merged them by selecting the top one, impressing Commander Control E for eat. So the top layer eats the bottom where that's how you can remember it if you need help. Okay. Now, I'm gonna...

go back to the crop tool. And I'm actually gonna extend this campus even more just because I need some room toe work for this distortion to take place. So I'm gonna increase the canvas area. And now we think before we do this, I'm going to duplicate this one more time and fill this bottom layer with black. But only I should say I only want to fill it. Basically, I want to make a shadow of this file. So I'm gonna lock the transparency, and then I'll choose edit Phil Black so that we have the photo. And then underneath it, we have what will become the shadow for that. And then I can unlock the transparency. Okay. Ah, so now we're ready to distort this so we'll come up will target this image layer and will come up to the filter menu and choose, Distort, displace. Oh, not displace what I'm thinking. Filter distort. Sheer. That's what we want. Sheer Okay. And now we could just take this and like, your you can bend it now. The trick is, I think, and you can do all kinds of things. You can add points to make, you know, wavy Um wavy distortions. That's not what we want. Um, so I'm just going to click toe at a point in the center, and then I'm just gonna drag really slightly to the left. If we go too far, it's like, really easy to go too far. So I just want a smidge of a little bit. And then I'm going to click, OK, and then I need to target the shadow layer here, and then we're going to do the the opposite. So this time filter distort sheer and then we'll go this way about, like by the same amount. But just which is barely. Okay, we'll click. OK, now we can take this shadow layer. Grab the move tool, bring it on this side, see what's happening. Nice. And of course, we'd want to blur that because it should be soft. So will come up to filter blur Gaussian blur because we blur everything. Seems like Ghazi and blur everything. Something about like that. And then we need a mask. It I think, from parts of this, so we could either mask it. Or maybe we could just commander control t and transform it a little bit. Tuck it in doesn't need to be on the side. So something about like so and then I'm going to take both of these layers. And now we can drag them into this scene and rotate them and scale them. And then we need to really reduce the opacity of that shadow and blur it some more so that it matches kind of what's happening here. That looks pretty good, though, right? And then, like other things I would probably dio would be to maybe de saturate this a little bit. So on that top layer, Commander Control, you just looks like a little too bright, maybe to be like it looks like it's on a screen, because it is so I'm gonna dial that down and thin. Another thing that we might dio is I'm gonna merge these together now and then probably add some noise because if we look at this image, you know, there's some noise happening, and then this is like, perfect. So it doesn't look very realistic. So I would come up to the filter menu and here's an example of just like some noise, normal noise, A very small amount. So just even like 3%. But you can see the before and after. Maybe I overdid it even. Maybe I would do more like 1% but just a little something to make it look like I didn't just paste in a digital file into that scene.

Class Description

When it comes to Adobe® Photoshop® filters, there’s more than meets the eye. Beyond cheap tricks and quick fixes, Khara Plicanic will show you the powerful manipulations, effects, and more that one can do when utilizing this tool. Discover new uses for filters you thought you knew, and several you likely overlooked.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

Reviews

Amy Vaughn
 

Khara is knowledgeable, creative and has a fun and easy to understand teaching style. This class goes over some of the default Photoshop filters and offers ideas about how to use them for creative effects. My favorite new thing I learned was about displacement maps, but I'm looking forward to trying more of these out.