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Diving into Photoshop Filters

Lesson 2 of 12

Finding Hidden Filters

 

Diving into Photoshop Filters

Lesson 2 of 12

Finding Hidden Filters

 

Lesson Info

Finding Hidden Filters

we're just going to get started with a straight up, simple kind of just good old reliable filter. We're just going to take this image and style, eyes it. So the filters are found up here under the filter menu, and we'll talk about like how they're arranged and what all this stuff really is in a moment. But right now, just to show you a quick get us some quick bang for your buck If we go to the filter menu and we choose stylized, we can come in here and choose oil paint, and we'll get our, um, controls up here, and we want to make sure we have the preview turned on so we can see what's happening. But here we have all kinds of sliders where we can adjust all kinds of things about how this filter is applied. And I think one of my favorite things if I'm using this filter is I want the scale to be rather large. Um, but we are gonna be limited as far as it's related to our resolution. So this image is rather huge right now. And so even at the the highest scale, if I click OK, and I zoom in o...

n it. The brush strokes are still pretty small and there's ways, you know, we could do some of this by hand to you can create this look. But if we're just talking about filters, if we wanted bigger brushstrokes, we'd have to downsize the image. So just to show you for sake of comparison, I'm gonna undo that will go into image size and let's adjust it, Teoh. Oh, even I have, like, 1200 just so you can see. Uh huh. And we'll go back to the filters and shoes, stylized oil paint. And now we get much bigger strokes. So I don't know if, like, if that will ever get an update or not. But but some of them, um, are really going to rely on the resolution as faras the effect that you get. Okay, so that is a look at just a quick, straight up applying of filter. For those of you have been around in photo shop for a while, you may notice that there's some missing filters here, like there used to be a category just called artistic, and it would be right here, and it's gone from the menu. It's not gone completely, but it is gone from this menu. And if you are someone who like lives for the artistic filters and you want them back in the menu, you can get them from your preferences. So on a PC, you would find that under the edit menu, you'd find preferences down here on a Mac. It's under Photoshopped Preferences, and it's under plug ins. And someday, when it opens right here under the plug in subcategory, there's an option to show all of the filter gallery groups and names in the menu. I'm gonna leave it turned off, just so I remember to talk about it when I'm teaching. But, um, you can bring that back if you want to. Otherwise, to get to those other filters, you have to go to what's called the Filter Gallery. So let's take a look at this image here, and if we go up to the filter menu, we have all these different categories down here. But like I said, some of them are missing, and we'll find them here in what's called the Filter Gallery. And initially, when you get here, you might think, What is this like What am I even looking at? So let's talk about what we have here. Um, we're here on the right hand side. We have the settings that we can work with, and there is an all inclusive list of all the filters in alphabetical order right here. So if you ever can't find what you're looking for because you don't remember if it was labour, if it's in the artistic folder or was it a sketch folder or whatever? If you can't remember where it is, but you remember the name of it, it might be easier to find it from here. So this is where you can control the effects of each filter. And then over here they're just grouped into folders so you can go through and like, click on them and and then you'll see it render over here. And it might take a minute because some of them are rather memory intensive, of course. So that's going to render out. And this is your preview panel, where you can zoom in or zoom out, and then you can click to drag around, just as you would in photo shop. What's cool about this is some of these filters work with your current foreground and background colors. So, for example, if I'm clicking on neon glow, um, right now and you're wondering, like, where is this purple coming from? If I cancel out of here, we see that that is my foreground color. So some of them, when you click, you're going to get these wild colors And you're like, Where is this coming from? How do I change it? That's not what I want is coming from your current foreground and or background colors. So to get the effects that I want right now, I'm gonna go ahead and change my foreground and background colors. So I'm gonna zoom in and click to select this sea foam greenish color from the Ferris wheel right here. And then I will option click on yellow to select about as my background color. So I pressed I to get the eyedropper tool, and I just clicked to select my foreground color and alter or option click to select my background color. So now I'm ready to go back to the filter gallery, and now I get some other kind of gross mess because I'm on the colored pencil filter Okay, So, um, what's really cool and unique about the filter gallery, as opposed to just running the filters straight from the menu, is that we are able to stack them. So the first thing I want to do is add, um, paint Dobbs. So I'm gonna click on the paint Dobbs filter. And what I love about this is if we zoom in, just creates this instantly stylized look, and I just love that. It's kind of like dreamy and nostalgia can so you can play with the settings. Obviously, we can enlarge the brush size, so the larger that we make it, the less detail we're going to get from it. So in my messing around, I went with something like 15 and 25 for my settings. Now what's cool is that we can actually add in the filter gallery we can add layers just like the layers panel in photo shop itself. So that all happens right here. So I kind of think of it as like, a filter buffet so way have a plate with paint jobs right now. But maybe we want to add something to that. So down here at the bottom, I can click the new layer button, and I actually get another layer of, in this case, paint jobs. Let me change that, and I'm gonna go with something called What am I Doing? Articulation. So that is under the sketch options. So we'll go to sketch and I'll click Articulation. And now it's going to apply it and you'll see that it's applying these colors that I chose for my foreground and background so we can tweak these settings to So whatever works here, I happened to go with the four and 26 and I liked how that looked. And then, if we want to add yet some more texture, there's already a lot of texture in here. But if we wanted more, we can add another plate, and then we could go get our texture. So there is some preset textures. Or then there's the texture riser, or we can choose a variety of other presets. So we'll just do some a simple sandstone texture, maybe 200%. But very well draw the relief down a little bit. Okay, so that looks interesting. Um, let's pretend we're happy with that, so we'll go ahead and click. OK, now we have this image here, and what's cool about the filters to is you can easily reapply your last filtering concoction. So if I decide that I need to reform at this image for, let's say, I don't know a book cover because I make everything in the book covers, I should just be a book cover designer. So I'm gonna undo the filter. And then he grabbed the crop tool and I'm just going to drag upwards. We'll turn on content aware and see how Photoshopped handles this. So I'm reformatting this image to make it vertical so it can accommodate a book and all of the copy that goes along with, Yeah, no photo shop that is an example of a severe Photoshopped fail. It's kind of cool, though. It looks like a like a kaleidoscope pattern. Yeah, so not so great. Let's just grab some color and a simple round brush and we can just pain over that and then maybe try again and or or not care too much because, um, it's going to be covered with text, so something like that is fine. Okay, um but now we need to run that filter over again so I could go back to the filter menu and it could go back to the filter gallery. Or if you press command or control s, it'll just rerun whatever filter you just ran, which is a really handy thing. So I'll just avoid all of that and press commander Control F and it's gonna re filter. What? Oh, because I have different colors now. Ah, you see, How did that happen? Oh, because I was painting. Uh, silly me. Okay, now we'll run it again. It's always nice when Photoshopped me if you look like a liar. Oh, there we go. So maybe this is a horror book, and it's called fair game. And it's by you. See, you guys don't know how much thought goes into all the nerdiness that I do in class. It is by award winning author. You don't know me. My clever. Okay, Just kidding. So anyway, that is some fun that you can take like a really cheerful image. I mean, if we look at what we started with, this was like a cheerful, beautiful, happy, fun image. And now it's kind of a creepy looking book cover and it's and imaginary thriller of untold proportions

Class Description

When it comes to Adobe® Photoshop® filters, there’s more than meets the eye. Beyond cheap tricks and quick fixes, Khara Plicanic will show you the powerful manipulations, effects, and more that one can do when utilizing this tool. Discover new uses for filters you thought you knew, and several you likely overlooked.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

Reviews

Amy Vaughn
 

Khara is knowledgeable, creative and has a fun and easy to understand teaching style. This class goes over some of the default Photoshop filters and offers ideas about how to use them for creative effects. My favorite new thing I learned was about displacement maps, but I'm looking forward to trying more of these out.