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Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music

Lesson 10 of 18

Time Stretching in Akaizer

 

Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music

Lesson 10 of 18

Time Stretching in Akaizer

 

Lesson Info

Time Stretching in Akaizer

going back to time stretching. There's a plug in that I like. It's It's this free plug in its not super fancy. It's called a Kaiser, and basically what it's four is simulating the sounds of really old acai samplers and their time stretching. So when Times stretch and first came out, it was pretty, um, primitive. And the the algorithms where they cut these up these samples up and you decided which samples to pull out to get you to your target tempo. They didn't have a lot of processor power because it was, you know, like running in hardware in the nineties and and they just didn't sound great, But they sounded very distinctive and all of the time stretching that you hear in like old jungle and drum and bass records from like 94 to 96 early, you know, like rave records and things like that. That time stretching was mostly done on these old acai samplers. And so here's a plug in that I really like, because it simulates that really kind of gritty, like bad time stretching, Really, Um, whic...

h could be a really cool effect to use in your songs, especially if you're trying to go for that older sound or just want something, Um, not as your main beat, but maybe it's an accent or something for a transition that has a kind of more gritty feel to it. So this is the normal sample. You can tell it, um, I want to change it. You know, I want it to be 80% shoes, 80% of the original tempo, um, or I want it to be way slow. So I wanted to be 100 and 50% of the original tempo, Which would be let's see 1 27 63. Yeah, something like 80 beats per minute. And you can hear that, like, almost metallic ring to it of the sample being cut up and repeated, Um, and you can you can tell it how fast or slow that, um, that basically dicing up of the sample should be, which gives you some some control over that Tambor give you almost like robotic effects with you can also use it to pit shift, and it gives you a lot of those like old school in 1994 kind of sounds. It's, uh yeah, I think It's like a free plug in online I I really enjoy. It's kind of does a thing that not a lot of other thing. You know, unless you're digging up that old hardware, it's it's hard to get those sounds. Um, so let's talk a little bit about other kind of editing tricks you can do with these break beads. So you know you can cut him up. You can rearrange them. I think playing with reversing parts of them could be a really, uh, interesting way to get some additional texture in there. So let's see. Um I think also you can speed things up and slow things down, even in the, uh, the track. So you have, like, you can give almost a melodic ah feel to the sample by speeding up certain sections of it. Um, doubling things up also is a is a thing you can kind of do, Um, which creates almost a flan jing effect. So I'm gonna duplicate this track, delete all of these, but this so you can kind of hear what I'm talking about. Where you have two copies of this playing in it, and it makes it kind of flan Let's turn that down to give a little better example of that. A loop that so you can hear a little better. Um, that's a thing again, you hear in a lot of, like, old jungle records and stuff, um, and then getting really, like, tiny and surgical with your chops. So this is a thing. If you're in the like, I d m. I think this technique really, like started in jungle Records in the mid nineties. And then if you're in the idea and like, um, you know, Aphex Twin Auto Checker. Really? I took this to its logical conclusion Where you have a sample on and maybe you take this kick drum, Andi, you know, if you cut it this way, it sounds just like to kick drums. You do half of that. It sounds kind of like a drum roll. But then let's say you cut the kick drum in the 16 parts and repeat it. You get this like, robotic kind of stuttering noise. You know, that's almost like it definitely doesn't sound like a bass drum. It sounds like a different thing. And, you know, you can cut that down even more. Come back in the 30 seconds or anything and experiment with, like here. If we draw a volume automation in here, you know, like having a fade in having a fade out. So you have these crescendos and these weird kind of otherworldly noises and drum rolls on stutters that you're making out of these out of these samples from, you know, records from the sixties or seventies.

Class Description

Classic analog drum machines have morphed into a massive library of available options for the modern producer. How do you decide when a 707 kick or a 808 hihat is more appropriate for the song? What about blending in these classic sounds with sampled grooves?

Chrissy is a genre-bending DJ/producer that has been called a “walking encyclopedia of 30 years of dance music.” In Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music, he will guide you through his techniques to isolating the perfect drum groove, reinforcing them with programmed drums and chopping, warping, and rearranging samples into floor-crushing beats that will get played at clubs. 

You’ll learn:

  • How to chop up samples from a song when you only have the fully mixed version
  • Mixing tips for creating jaw-dropping kicks and crystal clear punchy snares
  • How to use compression to make your drums thicker and louder

With a myriad of drum machines, sample kits, and programmers, it can be overwhelming to match the tones with the grooves you create. With classic tracks to sample and a myriad of tools to draw from, Chrissy will show you how to completely own drum production for electronic dance music.

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