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Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music

Lesson 8 of 18

Time Warping Breakbeats in Sony Acid

 

Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music

Lesson 8 of 18

Time Warping Breakbeats in Sony Acid

 

Lesson Info

Time Warping Breakbeats in Sony Acid

different dogs have different ways of kind of time. Straight, You know, they all have their own proprietary kind of coding an algorithm for how they stretch these samples. And some of them sound better than others. I think acid has two different ones You can choose from one, I think sounds really bad. The other one, I think, sounds really good. Able turn. Theirs is called warp. I think it falls a little bit in the middle. So let's see. You can set it here, too. Be beat mapped, which basically means it determines what the tempo is and switches that temple upto whatever. You set the master tempo of the record of the song too. So here we have 1 27 stretch down the 1 If I go up the 1 37 it just automatically brings it to 1 Um, Now, the nice thing about able to war is that here? Oh, uh, pull it up real quick. A lot of these break beats, you know, there were live drummers, andi. Often they didn't have, you know, a metro gnome or anything. They were just playing right. Sometimes they'll hav...

e headphones and they'll have a click track, which is just a metre gnome that they can play along to. That keeps them kind of on tempo, but especially in records from the sixties. They were just playing and the tempo fluctuates and it can fluctuate pretty wildly over record to the point where a drum sounds really good to you. And then you try and put it with a drum machine and parts of it just send way off, Um, and enable Tum You can take that sample, apparently pull it up in this view and you can determine right here. See, it has warped on, which means that it's determining the tempo you can actually set where the one and the two and the three in the four are. For all of these different beats, you can tell it well, the first beat comes right here, and then this beat comes right here and and you can adjust for the drummer being a little bit off and say, You know, I know that being a robot, you're going to anticipate every beat to be perfectly spaced. But I'm telling you today that the second beaten this is off and you need to pretend like that's where the Beatles and it'll compensate and fit each beat Teoh to the grid based on what you told it, Um that having been said, I don't think it sounds quite is perfect as some other algorithms. Um, if you have ah, drum sample that's really off beat and you want to fix it and you find that a Bolton isn't really fixing it. The other thing you can do And this is the old fashioned way that we had to do it before any of these programs had warp is you. Ah, let's see 1 You could open it up as its own file in your dog and say, um, you know, this snare right here is off. I'm gonna move it back toe where it's right on the beat. You see that little marker right there? I'm gonna move that So it fits exactly on that grid and then do that for every single hit of the instrument. It's time consuming. It's really, um, an obnoxious thing to have to do. But sometimes you have to do it, you know, um, so again, I'll just play the loop through so you can kind of hear what it is. So, um, if you wanted to make a new rhythm out of that, you could you could chop this break, beat up and rearrange it. Any number of ways to kind of make your own rhythm pattern or Teoh do something unique and personal with it kind of distinguish yourself from all of the other producers who are sure to have, you know, sampled the same thing. So let's see. We have but kick, snare and then a beat where it's, you know, the third beat. It's just kind of symbols, and then you have a snare on the 44 again. So the snares right here. So if I pull that over and paste that here and then double that up, he's kind of another rhythm that I built out of that. That's a little mawr, um, almost almost like a rhythm that you'd have more like a drum and bass record or something like that, like a you know, a breaks record or a trip hop record. And most of these air going to be pretty basic drum programs that you're just, you know, our basic rhythms, like a two step rhythm or a four on the floor rhythm or kind of like the electro rhythm that you hear in like Planet Rock. And you're basically just building that out of somebody else's drumbeat on finding a new way. Teoh re invent those rhythms but that having been said like feel free to get weird with it and come up with something totally off the wall on duh, you know, really experiment and chop things up and rearrange them. However you want A Z conceive A. Here I have this whole sample, and I've drawn all these little regions here, and they correspond to all the different, um, percussion hits in the sample. So here's the first bass drum, the second with the snare, a symbol. Those are four different symbol hits so together that two more picks the snare and it goes through the whole sample like that.

Class Description

Classic analog drum machines have morphed into a massive library of available options for the modern producer. How do you decide when a 707 kick or a 808 hihat is more appropriate for the song? What about blending in these classic sounds with sampled grooves?

Chrissy is a genre-bending DJ/producer that has been called a “walking encyclopedia of 30 years of dance music.” In Drum Sample Editing & Programming for Electronic Music, he will guide you through his techniques to isolating the perfect drum groove, reinforcing them with programmed drums and chopping, warping, and rearranging samples into floor-crushing beats that will get played at clubs. 

You’ll learn:

  • How to chop up samples from a song when you only have the fully mixed version
  • Mixing tips for creating jaw-dropping kicks and crystal clear punchy snares
  • How to use compression to make your drums thicker and louder

With a myriad of drum machines, sample kits, and programmers, it can be overwhelming to match the tones with the grooves you create. With classic tracks to sample and a myriad of tools to draw from, Chrissy will show you how to completely own drum production for electronic dance music.

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