Photo & Video > Portrait > Environmental Portrait Photography > Retouch Images In Photoshop

Retouch Images in Photoshop

 

Environmental Portrait Photography

 

Lesson Info

Retouch Images in Photoshop

The first thing I'd do is general cleanup, just because I like to get that out of the way and saved. For this image, we'll do a little bit of skin cleanup, not much, like I said, I'm just looking for anything that's really distracting. So I'd like to get a new background layer. Let me adjust the Photoshop window here. I guess I could just hit that. Okay, so what we can do, some of these fly away hairs, just little things. I'm gonna do that in a new background layer, in case I screw up I can mask it out or start over. So that's command J and I'm gonna use the patch tool, which I have set as a shortcut J and it goes to the patch tool. We're just gonna go in and I'm gonna get rid of some of the lighter colored hairs that are catching the specular highlight that are gonna annoy me later because they're slightly distracting. Sometimes you'll have to use a clone tool to get this if you have hairs that are too close together or are too close to a contrasting edge. For the most part, we can ge...

t rid of the vast majority of these by using the patch tool. Again, I'm not a professional retoucher, but I've done this for awhile and I know what works for me and I also know that, for the most part, I'm gonna look at these photos a lot closer than anybody else. So if I think it looks pretty good and I'm okay with it, that's about as far as I'm gonna take it. But I'm just getting rid of a few of those hairs. You can see just lining those back up. Just quick work of anything that is overly distracting or even mildly distracting really because I don't wanna look at the image later and have that bother me. This might be an area where you could clean it up with a clone tool instead of a patch tool, but it's okay. Just about done with that. There's some sort of bright spot there. So that's good with hair. We'll do some light blemish removal, anything that's overly distracting. Again, I'm not trying to make this into a beauty ad, but if there's things, you know, he's a basketball player. There's gonna be some nicks and cuts and bruises and bumps, that's fine. Just getting rid of anything that's too obvious. And any unwanted reflections, again, that's why I didn't wanna shoot with the backlight hitting his nose because then I have to come in and retouch it all later or I could spend eight seconds just moving the light ahead of time and not have to deal with that. This looks pretty good. Again, still using the patch tool. You could use the healing brush for this too, either way. I just like the patch tool 'cause it helps me in some other areas that we'll talk about momentarily. So anything that's overly bright. I'm okay with any of that. This reflection on his lip is a little much. That's good. Alright, this might be a challenge. I don't even know if I wanna tackle that. No, not right now. That's just the new brands, this gaff taped athletic wear. A couple things I would do if I were getting really picky and I'll just do it 'cause we're here is removing this blue cord especially. So that's one where I'd create a new background layer. We'd go in with the clone tool. Bracket left to make a smaller tool. Again, this is an area where if no one knows, if you never saw the before image, you would never think to look down here, but I'm gonna get rid of it because I don't like it. It's my picture and I can do that. And I'm gonna get rid of the shadow of that cord too 'cause without a cord, there won't be a shadow. We're just gonna do this not in the most thorough way. I gotta turn the opacity up on this brush. I'm not gonna spend a lot of time on this 'cause you guys get it, but I do want it to look good for the final image. Almost there. This could be a good time for any questions too. Anything? Do you always do your own retouching, someone asked, Yvonne asked. I do my own retouching unless somebody else wants to pay someone else to do it, so for the most part, yeah, it's me. There are occasions like for larger ad shoots and things like that where retouching is included, some editorial. I know the last shoot I did for ESPN, they handled retouching 'cause they wanted it a specific way. Things like that. But for the most part, I do it because I'm picky. I don't mind doing it. We could even move this whole thing altogether. Let's see if we can make that happen without spending an ungodly amount of time on this. So I just wanna see if we can do it quickly and make it look somewhat realistic. So we have to line up seams and all that good stuff. Thrilling work. And again, if you weren't here, you wouldn't know this was ever there. So that's one of those things that if you're getting super picky, you have to remember, why would anybody be looking at the bricks near the floor and I'm not even gonna tackle that right now because that'll be mind numbing. One thing I might do is just make it really dark so you can't even see the white, but whatever, that's fine. We'll call that good for now. So what we did was we cleaned up the blue cord. See, you can't even see what I did, so it's so far away, who cares. But I am picky enough that when we see it up close, I wanna make sure his face looks good. I want (mumbles) look at these pictures. Whatever client it is, it's a true collaboration, because I wanna take pictures of people where they look at 'em and they're like, oh yeah that looks pretty cool, I look good. And I wanna look at the pictures from a photo standpoint and be like, yeah that does look pretty good. It turned out how I wanted. I want everybody to be happy from the client to myself, mostly the client and that to work out. So as far as actual retouching, again, we planned out the rest of it by not having this thing come out of the top of his head. We thought about all these details up front, so now I don't have to remove that because it's coming out of his shoulder. I don't care so much about that. His head's framed up nicely. It's not anything distracting. That highlight on the window does not bother me much. I mean, that'd be natural from a light being back here. That haze is a happy accident. I didn't mean for that to happen, but it's kinda sweet. So I would then save this, level 10 JPEG and we'll call that good for right now.

Class Description

Are most of your portrait sessions in an environment other than a studio? Learn to light your subject in any setting through simple techniques that lead to dynamic photos. Editorial photographer and lighting expert, Dan Brouillette teaches how to work in and shape light for any environment (indoors or outdoors) while creating a workflow that allows you to work independently and quickly. You’ll learn:

  • How to light in a variety of portrait scenarios
  • The benefits of tethering while shooting
  • Quick lighting solutions to enhance your shot on set
  • Culling techniques and post processing tactics to create high end images and portfolios

By incorporating light in new and inventive ways, Dan will help you push the boundaries of your portraits and improve your workflow. It’s time to work on your skills and expand your creativity to attract the clientele you’ve always wanted to have.