Family Photography: Capturing Connection

Lesson 33 of 38

Photo Mounting Demo Part 1

 

Family Photography: Capturing Connection

Lesson 33 of 38

Photo Mounting Demo Part 1

 

Lesson Info

Photo Mounting Demo Part 1

We're going to mt in a float mount this water color print of this little baby girl she's super cute if I don't do it this way so the cameras can see it and one of the first things I'm going to do is I'm going to start deck ling the edge okay and this is always the scary part for people when I'm also going to do is just do a quick measurement you need a pencil teo I love number what is it about a yellow number two pencil they're just awesome sauce okay, so my images ten by seven so I'm just going to write that down in the corner so I know what exactly my images this is where it gets really fun alright you want a line your ruler up just inside the image now when you ripped paper there is an easy side and I'm more resistant side okay when you start tearing paper often you'll begin to feel it out and every paper is different. It has to do with the grain of the paper when you're tearing against the grain it's going to feel a more resistant when you're tearing with it it's going to feel very...

easy to rip okay the key to this is even pressure on your your hand here and when you rip to rip up in a very smooth even fashion so that you create a clean edge against your print okay, so I'm gonna go ahead and do that again on this sign now with dark prince like this especially black ones if they're not coded I recommend putting another piece of paper down so that your ruler is not scratching the surface of the print. Okay, you know how many times competition prints especially your painting like silver paint on the edge of a competition print and you're tired and you hit the print with a little nick a paint k tel I've done that a lot. Oh, no, I used this crap up to it just makes you like how your heart thing there's something and you know what guys there's something about analog I mean I love digital but there is something about focus focus focus this is the tough side this is against the grain sign. You can feel it when you do it there's something about working with your hands and at the studio you just saw that picture back there of me painting, painting the edge of my print at the studio I have an analog area and a digital area and there's something to be said for just spending the day doing this um in your studio it's just so magical I love it. Okay, so there is a deck old print edge not that hard guys you'll freak out. Trust me the first time you do it with your principal practice go order some fine art velvet paper from epson and just practice doing it make a straight edge line like with a with a ruler with a pencil and just practice ripping along that edge and seeing if you can get it even just feel it I strongly encourage you to feel it more than anything that's that's how it's going to get good okay so now we're gonna go ahead and paint so I've picked three colors here I'm kind of trying to decide which one I like the best which will stand out the most on tv here so I think I'm gonna do is and I'm always such a creative nightmare sometimes I am a mess like I will I want to see what a color looks like so I'll pour it out on the paper all three of them and kind of hold him up I tell ya see mmm but hey you know they always say messy people who are creating they know exactly it means they're very creative so I like to hear okay, so which one do you like to see here? Yeah tools and things that you need that's all in the keynotes correct okay it is let's do this once we do this one kind of coppery pretty one I think that'll look pretty so that was this one wasn't it? I'll make myself a nice did you have more questions on did I cut you off okay, so then what? Ideo I always keep my paint on this side and the print on this side I'm right handed. So that's what I do and I turn the print. Okay, don't put paint over here and drag it over there. It'll drip on your campus and you will be p oed. Okay, so then it's, just a matter of taking the pain and what I often do is kind of overload my brush and dab it so it's thick around the entire edge. Table's a little low, but that's. All right, let me tell you, this is the most cathartic, relaxing thing. All you crafters out there going through so much fun, and I'm gonna move pretty quick, so we get this done. So while I'm doing this and you guys are watching, are there questions about what I'm doing? And you grab a mic? Are you leaving white spaces? I can't see no, I am not leaving any white space. I am all that that ripped edge that's, bright white. I'm getting rid of it because when I put it against the matte board, so what I'm going to end up doing is I'm gonna put this on top of the fabric here. Okay, so I'm going to mount the fabric on the map board and then this is going to float mount on top of it with a mat. Okay, so I don't want that white edge to show up against the dark fabric because it's distracting okay, so I am using that paint that copper colored paint to create a little bit of a luminous and ej and basically hide the deck old edge. Okay, does that make sense to ask that question with emily? Was john any other questions while I'm plugging away here, the first one being can you tell free minder again? Did you start with a dry brush? I did start with a driver great and then ariel ariel a xena fain and this one has about remember everybody, you can vote because there is no glass behind the image I'm worried about the dust how does that come with you with these? Okay, that one doesn't have it. I wanted earlier I wanted you to see what the actual edge looks like, but when I provide these to my clients, they come with museum anti glare glass because yes, dust and she's absolutely right just is a huge problem, especially on this kind of print that's matt the dust sticks to it like crazy and you can't get it off, so I highly recommend doing these under glass sphere clients now for competition who are allowed to have glass so I just know print like I showed you and they get presented in competition that way and that's not archive well I mean obviously it has to be behind glass in order to be or coated in a very special way to be archival but to keep things just free for sure you want to do glass but I don't use water until the very end what I need to rinse my brush so I just kind of keep dip it in paint as we go and if you're in a hurry you will mess up and I'm in a hurry so I probably will mess up but anyway this is you will find yourself just loving doing this especially after you've been sitting in front of a computer all day it's like this release teo be able to just paint your prince and it doesn't require any like artistic skill you just have to paint a straight line it's not like you're trying to paint a person or anybody we have more questions for you go for it just fire away well do yu on lee do this on fine art velvet paper can this be done on canvas and that chart no right ok if I'm gonna float mount of canvas I'll just use a straight cutter and there won't be a painted edge no you cannot rip the edges of campus but there's, nothing to say that you can't do a I just thought of something. There's there's no reason why you can't do mount a canvas right against the edge of a deco piece of paper. Now getting that smooth, perfectly smooth transition might be a challenge I might play around without just to see what happens, but I'm not sure that's actually the greatest idea in the world, but it's like a great it's a great idea. I'm not sure if it's work the best in the world, but that could be really cool. I have tried to like, you know how burlap if you pull out one edge of it, the edge gets afraid. I tried to do that with canvas, I haven't really figured it out yet, but I would love to get so that I could make the edges of my campus that frayed feeling and then you could paint and I think it would look really cool way we get a closer look, baby, just to take a look closer like we're dying to see this can't be possible. I know the audience online gets the camera from above, so they get to, like, see exactly what I'm doing, I don't know that's a technical question for my producer, I probably can't answer that one when you re watch it, okay? I still have a full edge to paint here, so we're doing good, but I want to show you what this finished product looks like, so I'm going to go around the entire edge even if I'm in a hurry here, but you'll notice that if I paint just kind of side to side along the edge here it's it doesn't it's just a flat soak in paint, but what if you kind of go in from the side and really thickly do the paint like this? It creates like the paint can be so thick that it'll give like it almost three dimensional look to the edge like it'll be a big bubble of paint you know that bubble paintings to play with a kid like dried, lumpy eso if you make it really thick like that, you can get that same feeling around the outside edge of your of your print, and I don't want any white showing because this is a dark background. I am really snuggling up to this edge here so that everything is all the white is perfectly covered, but you can see how thick that paint can get if you want it to be, and if it when it dries like that it's really spectacular in how it looks on your on your just minutes float mounted everything just kind of had this textural sculptural quality to it about fifteen minutes or so not you that depends on how thick you lay on the paint I think but um but yeah so I'm almost done is everybody have a chance to come up here and look at this that's steve hopkins wants to know why is why not use the ruler the straight edge to apply the paint the question because if that ruler gets any paint on it and slips it's gonna annihilate the rest of your gonna get paint all over the rest of your image so I've tried it trust me it sucks yeah like if I put the ruler right here I'm going to get paint on the ruler, right? Yeah and it'll bleed michelle's absolute right it'll bleed underneath the ruler and then the minute you take the ruler away ah yeah don't go there good idea though it seems like it would make sense but it doesn't it doesn't work any other questions as we go here can I you butt me in the studio to go back to the internet let's see frozen photog says what is your opinion on a metallic papers? Do you ever use that metallic papers? I don't really use metallic a lot and I honestly don't think you could dekel that edge you could try, but photographic papers don't really tear very well because they have ah coding I'm I'm getting down dirty now now I'm good actually preferred to work standing up or kneeling um it's one of those things that you can't really sit down and do this work you have to and what I often do is pink the paper beneath and then bring the paint forward onto the edge because I don't want to touch my parent no matter what I have made that mistake sometimes almost done here from candy is there any negative effect the longevity of the image painted no when you paint paint it's just like a fine art painter would paint a portrait of you as long as you use high quality find our pain you're fine great thank you okay that's it I'm painting so we're gonna go ahead and set that aside and let it dry we're going to take the paper officer you guys can see what it looks like but it has that beautiful sheen and it shines in the light so lovely the way that happens it's going to set that aside right there but the nice thing is that shooting happening remember it's a water based paint so you know clean up is not that hard because it just it can come off with water pretty easily where his oils you don't have that I'm just I'm gonna be cutting a mountain a matte board on here so I'll make sure I leased try it off okay set this aside they're ok, so I'm done painting that's painted edge you can also use sometimes instead of using paint, I was used chalks on the edge, so for a look that's not quite as dramatic, I'll take a dry paintbrush, pop it into my chalk and just dust the edge of the print with chalk instead of with paint, and that gives a whole unique look that different, so you can go to any fine art store and get these, and they come in all kinds of colors and do different things to your images. So experiment has some fun. I'm not such an art store junkie. Oh, my gosh, I'm going to like you tracked and I freak out, oh, it's like an office supply addiction, you know what I mean? He was going and everything that you just wanted by every single our product that's around. Oh, you know about it, and then they sit on yourself and you never do.

Class Description


As children, our parents define how we understand love. As parents, we learn what unconditional love truly means – learn how to capture the all the emotions of parenthood with images that tell the story of family.

Family Photography: Capturing Connection with Julia Kelleher will show you how to tap into the hearts of your clients through fine art family photography.

Julia Kelleher will teach you from basic to advanced - posing for parents. Create images with great posing that elicit genuine connection and speak to your client’s journey as a parent. You’ll learn how to work with parents and their young children to get photographs that reflect the sweetness and intensity of a child’s first years. Julia will assist you with developing:

  • Ideas for posing newborns, toddlers and children
  • A clear set of family posing rules
  • Lighting and post-processing technique
  • How to apply your unique experiences in parenthood to your own work
  • Storytelling strategies that promote your studio

Julia will cover the technical elements of family photography: lighting, posing, editing, and processing. She’ll cover artistic style and getting creative along with building a solid business foundation. She’ll also share the more intangible elements of a successful family image, and teach you how to connect the families you photograph and to capture that connection in camera.

Tumultuous, heart-warming, and joyous, parenthood defines who we are the moment our children arrive to us. Learn to capture the journey emotively in fine art images that transcend time and speak to your talent as a photographic artist — endearing your clients to you and giving them confidence to invest for life.

Reviews

Natalia Malinko
 

This is the second course with Julia I have seen. And it's amazing and very inspiring in so many ways! I appreciate so much the honesty of Julia, her spirit for doing things she loves. Like a photographer and artist myself, I feel identified with her perception of world and the passion for artistic and family photography. This course is about never give up, it's about hard work, and also it's about cultivating creativity and honesty. I highly recommended this course to every photographer who want to grow and understand himself and the business of professional high-quality photography. Thanks, Julia and Creative Live, for this one!

a Creativelive Student
 

So glad I bought this class - well and truly worth the investment. This course has helped me realise why it is so important to make an emotional connection and how to use it to my advantage {while giving my clients the very best too}. I cannot wait to try some new printing/mounting techniques...so glad Julia was kind enough to share this! I got a lot out of this course and would highly recommend it to anyone wanting to take their newborn photography business to the next level.

Jenny White
 

This class was amazing!!! Julia does a great job of showing her process, how she captures beautiful images from start to finish. It was worth every dollar I spent!!