HDDSLR Filmmaking

Lesson 22 of 26

House: Slow Motion Bull Ride

 

HDDSLR Filmmaking

Lesson 22 of 26

House: Slow Motion Bull Ride

 

Lesson Info

House: Slow Motion Bull Ride

E I think you know, having george about low budget lighting, which is you know I'm involved in that just as much is anybody else here when I'm doing I am projects or andre workshops or doing something as a favor for a friend andi I didn't have the money or the about the finances to rent a generator or to get a lighting yeah, but on certain projects and uh where it's, not a matter of whether he's no object is just sometimes you have to do is that things just all of certain problems and just recently on an issue of on a new episode of house and we did a bull riding sequence and the script dry just quite adamant adamant excuse me a roach in the script that they want to shoot it fifteen hundred frames a second on dh we all looked at that and I thought, oh, because what fifteen hundred frames a second means is that the cameras basically running so fast that effectively your shutter speed is so minute that you need a massive amount of light to make up for it because each time if you wanted t...

o stay on the same stop, for example said, you want to stay a tea for every time you double your frame rate you have to double the imagine lied that you have when it gets up to sixteen hundred frames you're basically talking about finding on extra I think it's six and a half stocks of light so it's like having to shoot that I need you to give my first assistant cameramen enough light to stand the chance of focus because when a mul runs around it's it's not exactly going todo on the marks that you put down for it and it's not going to do you imagine it's going to do it's going to do all kinds of weird things and so on you need to give you a focus puller it's a little bit of a chance so I thought, well I need to give the guys about team for to give them half a chance to get them half the shots in focus because at sixteen hundred frames when you have a shot that's out of focus it goes on for hours and it makes ukrainian is because it's not just like a quick shot but it's out of focus for a second that second goes on for five minutes and so it's red role to watch it is one of the worst experiences focused for lincoln have watching his work out of focus at sixteen hundred frames a second so way had divined six and a half stops of extra life on an interior because it was a rodeo ring down in california with them you know bullpens and all of that kind of stuff and you know a fairly massive place I mean rodeo rings already, you know, quite being it was about one hundred fifty feet by one hundred fifty feet is it kind of cycle wasn't rove or type of shape? So, um, anyway, I give delight. This was to basically use what we call nino lights, which are named after I'm dino de laurentis because I think they did some films back in the sixties or seventies again shown might know the hours into this, whether in a machin, avenge of life, palin and what they are, uh they're actually about that kind of size air about more or less about eight, five all or six by three something off that size, but what they basically are is a bank of thirty to one killer. What lie? So each lightest that's two thousand watts and you can, uh I think that passed sixty force that right? Sean knows past sixty wars and, um, wait, you're about that kind of damage and they comers on dh floods and spots and mediums, and sean is her fourth of we went from mediums just to give ourselves a little bit more punch, but in order, tio like this whole arena, we needed thirty over them, and I'm thirty dino large with on ly came so berryman this is thirty multiplied by thirty six thousand watts and it wasn't much of the lambs, but it was actually the weight of the cable to carry all the am pidge to these lambs that was so heavy that the this writes the engineer of the buildings should have said there's no way in a million years I'm going to let you hang those lights off my ceiling because it'll cost my building to collapse and so we then had to build two massive trust frames and put fifteen dino lives on each of the truss frames and in order to hold that a manager wait we used a ninety ton champion grains that's held these two trusses right up near the ceiling in the arena on brought all the cable down and of course a script comes out the writers written that you know, it's fifteen hundred frames a second the script gets approved because the production department has got no idea what this means and then they say, well, can we have a lighting budget with this? And then you you have been this lighting budget than this deadly silence about three days because the cost of doing that the rig forage I mean shown wouldn't know uh is just absolutely monstrous and I mean, it was like, you know, tending guys for two days I'm building the trusses cabling the lambs putting the lambs up, then we we hung an opened the knees a noble frame and it by four frame on reach bankam lives just to kind of blend g others became effectively like a massive soft overall top flight that was just out of picture and that's how we solve that problem when we just manage we used to camera called wise cam which is a video camera that um basically will run up to two thousand frames a second on dh we shot it that way and it's a rather interesting camera because it it basically records in a in a loop so the important part about using those high speed cameras and I think the same applies to the phantom camera that shoots that there's kind of incredible frame rates is that the important part is where you choose to stop it because you have the eight seconds when you should I mean depends what frame rate europe but at sixteen hundred frames you you shoot about eight seconds a really time but obviously that's a very, very long sequence when it's played back in you know twenty four frames as opposed to sixteen hundred framing is like sort of five or ten minutes becoming what it was now but but it's eight seconds a real time so I'm pressing the stop button is the most critical thing of all that you hit that stop button at the right point otherwise you just miss what us close to recapturing and so it's really quite tricky and there's a lot of frayed nerves and all of that stuff, but it it worked out really well and when you see, I think it was about from probably about episode eighteen or something like that of the last season of house when you see and twelve hundred or fourteen hundred bound mohr floating through the air like a bubble, you know, symone in slow mo it really is quite a remarkable sight. You see things that, uh you would never believe possible like him most not flying like, you know, for a minute you see things, it is almost like motion analysis. I think most of these very, very high speed cameras were kind of developed to see what happens to a jet engine when it's um, smashes it selves self to pieces or on engine, you know, they were designed for studying machinery that breaks up under pressure, and you can never see it in a normal nation. So a lot of the high speed cameras came out of that scientific research thing that that was, um um, you know, I became very unpopular with productions, you know, having to have all these lights and they kept coming at me again and again and again, saying there's got to be another way of doing this has got to be another way of doing this and there wasn't any other way I can think of doing it. If I let it all from the side, one side would have been incredibly hot in the fall off would have been enormous. We could have taken the roof off this stadium on dh, but that would have been a nasty auction, too. So sometimes there are only expensive solutions, and so from the low budget lighting to this is the kind of spectrum of things that you may well come to encompasses a dp or is a gaffer auras an electrician's norm? You know, if he'll make him, you know, sure we do, so I think we should take if there any questions on that should be great, and then we should take a little bit of a break because I forgot what especially doing next. Everybody enjoyed that story, there's not a lot of direct questions other than movies by day pool saying, why not shoot it in an outdoor rodeo arena? Because the festival I didn't think there is one. Well, you know you you're limited on locations, on in any, in most cities by what they call their zone, you have to stay within the zone, so I'm most rodeo rings that kind of, I think, interior because of you keeping people out of direct sunshine they like to have some kind of weather production rather than just being an open and kind of situation but that was the rodeo ring that was chosen by the director and the location department so there wasn't a choice you know yeah, I enjoyed that story yesterday if you're talking about all the power that it took really that's enough that was really cool so you know, we don't have too many questions specifically about that okay yet so oh chases question ohio are you weigh do it wonderfully frustration um what what? Uh what was the foundation of her decision to use the camera that you chose instead of, say, a phantom or a phantom flex or something? Is it limited by brand or what was the decision? I think I think the choice probably only was only the wise camel the phantom and in retrospect, I probably I didn't realize the phantom and being upgraded but the previous time I preferred the wives can because we looked at the cameras but I think since that initial time I used the the wise can defend him is probably a better choice now, yeah, I get that you get a new sensors so it's got more sensitivity laden you think terry? Yeah, absolutely. So I think I think the phantom probably is the better choice

Class Description

For the first time in history, a camera that costs roughly $2,500 can shoot material good enough to hold its own weight on the highest professional levels. 


Gale Tattersall, renowned Director of Photography, has been at the forefront of pushing HDDSLR's in Hollywood. He shot the season finale of House entirely on a Canon 5DMII last year. In this HDDLSR filmmaking workshop, he teaches the ins and outs of making great films with HDDLSR cameras. 

Note: Neither NBC Universal, Fox Television or any other entity involved in the production of the House M.D. program endorses or is in any way responsible for the content and production of this workshop program.

Reviews

Kenna Klosterman
 

Watch this AWESOME behind the scenes video of the Gale Tatersall workshop from in-person student Jenny May Finn on YouTube: http://youtu.be/3WbR4VC1id8 Thank you Jenny May for sharing how fabulous it is to be part of the studio audience!

a Creativelive Student
 

It is a very good class, with a lot of information and exercises. It´s better to watch more than a couple of times.