HDDSLR Filmmaking

Lesson 26 of 26

Wrap Up

 

HDDSLR Filmmaking

Lesson 26 of 26

Wrap Up

 

Lesson Info

Wrap Up

I suppose what I would like to talk about is just how important it is to be if you wanted to be a filmmaker I know it's a cliche just go do it. I would like to show you a film that I made that is nothing very special. I made it with a very special director tom higgins on dh we did it together, we produced it together and they live together and it's called the modernist and just like it to be inspirational, peaceful even after all the days and the weeks and the months that I shoot on harris, I still find time to go off and do other projects because if it's in your soul you just don't stop you keep on doing things and you make him inge's and you create stuff and and there's never all the day from that I mean you always see images that you want to capture, you think of ideas loved to make films about you, write or read scripts and dream on dh now things tio hdgs ella's you convey ream less and actually do more. And so just as a party little thing I love to show this film called the body m...

ist so way happen to jews the hottest two days in existence in a place called barstow in california, which is halfway between l a and las vegas and them we went to made that film in the highest paid person in that film was the monkey you actually under reasonable about money? Everybody else did it every it was all my bodies from harris and them friends and family and things like that and, um you know what can I say just him if you have a good idea for a film just going to do it you know, now we have no excuse that that was actually shot on the red but it was before it was shot a little while you is before the hdtvs alarm system was around and it was the camera I could get for free at the time courtesy of a wonderful company called castling camera um but now you could so easily do that film on a five d or seventy or one debug for which other ever camera you choose and, um that ugo no excuses anymore anyone. So, um what else can I say? Can we tell you a couple comments from the chat room? She'll all right. Well, dave in c a said that gayle and creative live you're making me want to chase my dreams goal which I thought that's a great compliment yeah that's really nice and h tetanus that jail is awesome I hope creative live would bring more cinematography workshops we hope so it's well, cool I think I told you before when we're off camera that someone had said they'd learned more in the last three days than they had in the last twenty years regarding filmmaking I think it's kind of a different thing to see somebody in action so the way you think way you the way well, you know you operate there's a lot to be gained from that so that's that's really cool of you know, it's been a pleasure being here and you know, hopefully people learn something then that was the whole point of it so that's really cool have a question from sfo which is in an attempt to understand how a master craftsman like gail thinks and approaches a project to bring his special talents to bear sfo would like to know what you think are the qualities that make you unique among other cinematographers and that's that's difficult I you know, I mean of course I don't think I'm unique from the cinematographers I think they're much better settlement over is that myself more interesting work we just work in different areas and then just as the best you can hope and it worked people working for me and uh you know about style or well it's it's difficult if you choose your own style and you know, I think it's a matter on just being aware I think awareness is everything you know just keeping your eyes open for things that appeal to you and I'm going to galleries and looking great paintings is wonderful in terms of competition and there were so many things that you could do to improve your your visual objectivity I'm going to galleries watching light change you know, just if you just sort of at night lie on your bed and watch the ceiling, you'll be amazed the light display that comes from lights that come from car headlights and street lights and all kinds of things you know so it's a matter of being observant and then translating things that you see in two techniques that you can use on films or on television or in short sword whatever it might be, you know great is there anyone here that would like to have any final words or thoughts you'd like to share with gaylor? Steven worked like didn't compromise you were there, the pressure was on time was ticking but still you took the time that you knew that the shot needed in order to have its quality on I think a lot of beginner filmmakers maybe they compromise certain things, but when you set up the lighting and you have everything set up, you could shoot really fast once everything's in place well, I think you know, sometimes you know, we we actually own do have to compromise one way or the other because the luxury of time is you know it's all about time and money and especially in the last ten years the the pressure to perform quickly especially on dps and directors and actors and zone and so forth has bean pretty intense because production has it always was expensive but it's um you know it's become a lot of the arts now kind of run by large corporate bodies who are more interested in profit margin and they are in the the outcome of the product as long as it makes money but that is of course not helped by internet theft which is actually a good thing to talk about for a second because s so much internet theft going all of film projects that it makes it very difficult for filmmakers to get money to make films because of the amount of theft going on so I would encourage everybody to support companies that try and stop into that theft because it hurts everybody and prevents people from raising money to make films you know I suppose it's a little overwhelming to try and say it in a sentence weekend wass but it's he really gave me a lot of confidence first like filming like I would to approach a scene from the lighting to the camera angle too like the gear you views on especially took from it I said earlier what the audience wants to see them kind of calling it a relevant stuff and just being aware of everything I guess um I'm a lot more focusing which is nice we want to thank you for that it's an absolute pleasure thank you. Thanks for being you go I was really struck with uh your attention to craft on to put artists train into that and uh to, um like I said earlier to not compromise the quality to to maintain your minimum standard all time great looking too I think that's kind of important just purely because if you just start q ting rubbish no matter how much pressure gets applied to you in the end it's going to come back and bite you you know you do get a massive amount of pressure blood your television as I do but megyn board to maintain some kind of stand somewhere I mean that's a very good comment I really appreciate you walking us through setting up the shots which the lighting and the composition and putting things in the foreground and, um just really helping us to be able to learn by doing it but talking us through it and also stephen and jason were so great with that as well, talking us through using some of the equipment that was new to us and and just utilizing everything tio its full ability it was really a a wonderful experience and you're so genuine and I just really love the learning from you on things so much being here, it's been an absolute pleasure, and you know it is, you know, when you actually feel that you people are taking something away with them actually inspires you to do more. So that's called it goes both ways. You said several times, and I really try and take it to the heart, he said, separate your brain from your eyes, analyze the scene, and don't just let your brain say that let's ok and soothe auto correct for you that was a great tip on something I can I can use on anything. It is really important. That's a very good point. I mean, the more you could do that, look it from the objective lead from a photographic point of view, the more you're going to be a good director of photography, I believe seven good point the whole weekend, so incredible what's benefited. I know me personally. Being here in person is learning by example, as we've already discussed in seeing you really do through an entire scene, all the decisions that you make, uh, compromising when you actually have to, with same time doing your best to not let that affect the quality of the work, uh, just having a chance to put our hands on some of this equipment and really see how it's used you could only learn so much sitting behind a computer and reading books and things like that, and you just come what you've got to get up, do it. Learning by example like this is just absolutely invaluable contesting, thank you so much. Thank you all for being here has been a real pleasure. I couldn't wish for a nice group to work with love to think the crew that's helped, as in creative live, I've been blessed with a really terrific, grew fantastic bunch of guys who stopped me looking foolish and that wonderful cameramen that have been covering this in a very clever way, and I'm stopping me look like him. Some fat idiot knows, so way knows I really appreciate that they've all got skinny filters on so it's bean overall on three day trip, and I really enjoyed it. Thanks, just even things to jason and, uh oh, what a great three days.

Class Description

For the first time in history, a camera that costs roughly $2,500 can shoot material good enough to hold its own weight on the highest professional levels. 


Gale Tattersall, renowned Director of Photography, has been at the forefront of pushing HDDSLR's in Hollywood. He shot the season finale of House entirely on a Canon 5DMII last year. In this HDDLSR filmmaking workshop, he teaches the ins and outs of making great films with HDDLSR cameras. 

Note: Neither NBC Universal, Fox Television or any other entity involved in the production of the House M.D. program endorses or is in any way responsible for the content and production of this workshop program.

Reviews

Kenna Klosterman
 

Watch this AWESOME behind the scenes video of the Gale Tatersall workshop from in-person student Jenny May Finn on YouTube: http://youtu.be/3WbR4VC1id8 Thank you Jenny May for sharing how fabulous it is to be part of the studio audience!

a Creativelive Student
 

It is a very good class, with a lot of information and exercises. It´s better to watch more than a couple of times.