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How to Use the Face-Aware Liquify Tool

Lesson 6 of 9

Syncing Changes Between Multiple Images

 

How to Use the Face-Aware Liquify Tool

Lesson 6 of 9

Syncing Changes Between Multiple Images

 

Lesson Info

Syncing Changes Between Multiple Images

You guys may be familiar with the term preset, which is kind of what I'm going to be teaching a little bit about. It's the mentality of a preset, for sure. You know, it's a set of specific things that, um that can then be done on other images. So, as I mentioned in the beginning, we This also does work on illustrations as well. So for this example, I'm going to be using illustrations and, um, and then we're going to move on to video, which is going to be exciting. So let's take let's go ahead and duplicate this background layer, and we're going to take this into filter and we'll choose liquefy, All right, And so whenever you're dealing with, um, creating something, Teoh use it in the future. Liquefy is a little bit different. So instead of preset, what they have is they have something that's called a mesh. And if I come down here to my view options, I can choose to hide or show the mesh, all right? And so what that is is it's a note to photo shop about what the changes are that I that ...

I'm going to dio in in liquefy. So let's pretend like we're going to come up here and then we'll just use just for explanations sake. I'm going to make this a lot more and see how we're, um, we're basically modifying the image, but because it has this mesh over it, that's that's how Photoshopped tells itself. That's what the change is. Alright, by just having just cross basically a mesh over the image and allowing it to then say Okay, these pixels move in this way. It's almost like I always say, that liquefy is like printing out your image on Silly Putty and then being able toe like move it around and more fit around. Kind of like that. So this is what, um, this is the way Liquefy remembers what you did previously. All right, so what we're going to do is cancel out of that and let's talk a little bit about what we would want to create in order to use in the future. So here I've got to face is obviously one is smiling and one is sad. Okay, so if I I brought up these lines just to kind of show you the difference of what the face looks like and measures like the measurements of the face, um, went depending on whether or not the face is smiling. All right, so let's look at this. I know that this looks weird, all right? Yes, she She looks very weird, but you can see a couple of things that I want to point out. You see how much smaller the I is when you smile, right, So as smiles, not just using these muscles down here, it's using all the muscles in the face, right, So the nose doesn't really change too much, but let's see, You can see that the bottom lip stays somewhat similar, but the top lip is the one to move right. The top lip is what moves. And then look at the space between the nose and the upper lip here and the nose and the upper lip. Here it's, like, drastically different. Okay, so that's where most of movement iss. All right. It's not necessarily with the bottom lip, and it's definitely not just pulling out and up the sides of of a smile and being like, that's what a smile is. So if we wanted to create a preset like liquefy thing that would work on multiple images to make somebody look more smiley. Say you had a client that came in and her hamster just died or something like that. And you just you have five final images and you want her to just look a little bit happier in the images. Or you've got, like, a moody teen that comes in and the mom is like, make her look like she's having fun, right? Okay, I'm paying for this session like she's not going to screw it up. Um, so So that's kind of the thing that you want to think about. Um, whenever you are creating something to use on multiple images. So we've got this image here, and then we have our next image as well, and we'd like both of these images to be able to be a little bit smile more Smiley. All right, so let's go back to our 1st 1 We've got our layer one, which I should name liquefy. All right, now, let's go ahead and take this into filter liquefy, and you can see that Let me hide this mash again. You can see that even though there is a hair through the eye. This I still registers as an I and so does this one. Okay, so the things that we learned about what a smile does to the facial muscles is we learned that it makes both of the eyes a little bit smaller, right? And then the bottoms of the eyes also come up. So we're gonna click and bring that up just a little bit. So the eye height, we're going to give the eye height just a little bit. We're gonna make it a little bit smaller, little bit. Squint ear. One thing that I haven't shown you yet is this, um, this arrow that shows up right back here. You could tilt the I to whichever direction you want, so let's actually tilt it a little bit outwards. Okay, good. So let's see, p so so serious eyes a little bit softer. More smiley eyes. Do one of these, right? Just look at the eyes for just a second. You just hit the peaky and you can see the difference in the eyes. They're looking a little bit happier, right? All right, so good. We're on the right track. So now let's go to our mouth section and let's pull up the corners of the mouth. But remember that that's not the only thing that we want to do when it comes to creating a smile. Remember, those lips definitely need to come and be a little bit thinner, and then we can also spread them out just a little bit, Um, and so you can see my the changes that were made. We kind of If you look over here, you can see all the different changes that were just made by me clicking and dragging on the actual image. All right, so let's see, what's our preview look like? The sad, the regular face and then the smile. Okay, you can see how this is a little bit happier, a little bit happier. You know, you never want to go too far, especially with a with a preset or with a mesh. So we want to save this. Let's see what happens if I preview the mesh now do you see the You see the lines here, see how the lines are a little bit wonky. So that's how photo Shop is going to remember. That that area gets gets morphed. But here's the thing. I never really used to think that meshes were that beneficial before the facial detection software, because before it was like in the next image that I would try to use this mesh on. If it wasn't taking into account where the I is, it would just say these pixels right here they get morphed, even if there wasn't an eye there. So the fact that they've now incorporated in the mesh with the facial detection software with the Mona that they're using with the, um, the advanced learning on faces that's the only thing that's really making the possibility of using meshes across faces possible. Okay, so all right, so I'll turn off the mesh for just a moment. All right? We'll hide that mash. And then what I want to do is I want to save this so that I can use it in the future. And the way we're going to do that is actually to come over to our mesh options, and we're going to save this mash can. And then we're going to call this ad smile, too, and then it has an m dot m S h. We'll go ahead and press OK, and then we can either press okay for this, and then we can see it back here. Just she does look a little bit happier. And then let's go over to our next image that we want to use this on. Let's duplicate the background layer for this one and will double click the layer name to call this liquefy as well. And then we'll take this back into our liquefied dialog box. And now, because we've saved the mesh, we don't have to worry about tweaking anything in our face aware liquefy section. All we need to do is locate that mesh and add it back in. So what we could do is come to our load mesh button, and then we've got our ads, smiled to which we just created, and we compress okay, and then that's going to give us the little bit of the smile on the next image because it's taking into account. Okay, so the eyes have changed a little bit there, over here now, but here are the tweaks that the eyes are supposed to to do, and this is how the mouth is supposed to change. So if you had a client with five different images that just wanted to look a little bit happier in all of them. This would be a really good way for you to do the work on the front end and then reap the benefits each time you use the mesh that you saved yourself. Okay? The other thing you could do is you can choose to load the last mesh as well. So either of these loading a specific mesh that you've saved or just, you know, copy and pasting the at the settings will work.

Class Description

There's an extremely powerful hidden gem inside Adobe Photoshop CC - the Liquify filter! Face aware liquify allows you to use Adobe's powerful facial recognition software to make tweaks to any of your model's features. And when I say any, I mean ANY feature on your model's face! This incredibly smart technology will blow you out of the water and you'll be dying to use it in your next editing session!



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

Reviews

JIll C.
 

Kristina breaks down the use of the Face-Aware Liquify Tool in a way that makes it fun as well as practical. She included helpful hints on what to do if PS doesn't recognize the face, and provided numerous useful examples of simple changes to make faces more appealing. Making faces slimmer, minimizing double chins, opening squinty eyes, turning a frown into a smile - these are all "fixes" that clients ask for, and Kristina makes them look easy. I can't wait to load a few images and practice my new skills on my own!

Beatriz Stollnitz
 

Kristina is an incredible instructor. Not only are her explanations extremely clear, but she's super fun and engaging. In this class, she explains the newish face-aware liquify feature of Photoshop in depth. Highly recommended!