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Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 13 of 17

360 Shooting In The Field Part 1

 

Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 13 of 17

360 Shooting In The Field Part 1

 

Lesson Info

360 Shooting In The Field Part 1

Hey, and welcome to Tilden Park. Um, this is a acre park in Northern California just outside San Francisco, and we have the opportunity to come and make a quick film. Um, a little short piece. We're gonna sort of think of it as a walk in the woods. Um, we have this beautiful sunrise. We have the mist in the background. We have opportunities were moving. Water is coming through the park. You know, this is such a beautiful place. And I think that, um it's an opportunity for us to capture something that will transport people to a place that it would be worth going to a place that might be hard to get to, um and so I can only imagine this footage could be used for the scenario. Like you go to a spa and you're getting your back rub, and all of a sudden you get a VR headset, and now you're in a park. You know, you get to spend the day in this park, and and this is an opportunity, I think, both to capture the park, to bring it to people outside. Also, Teoh to bring a piece of the park to bri...

ng a stillness that the park brings to bring a sense of mindfulness. Right. So we want toe not just transport people to new places, but teach them things, um, and let them have a lasting effect. So part of what we focus on NPR's is, you know, goes beyond just giving people experiences but allowing people that when they take off the heads that they have a new peace to them, they they are, you know, better for it. And so, um, that's what we're gonna try to do today. We're going to try to bring together all of the beautiful elements of the woods of Tilden Park, um, into the headset, to allow people to become better people for our first shot. We were there at sunrise. And, um, I think it's really important to leverage all that nature can provide. So shooting and sunrise shooting at sunset? Um, finding the right sort of look and feel in the sky is really important for a lot of the work we do. Um, and so we wait and we see and we are methodical and try to be patient about getting the right conditions. Now in this morning. We went out at sunrise to capture this beautiful moment here. Now I'm gonna press play. This is a YouTube upload of the video we shot. And here I am, clapping, Okay. And, oh, eventually, I will leave the scene. So here I am running away. Here's the parking lot, and I'm gonna keep running and running and running until I'm totally out of the shot altogether. Um, that little SCV is actually the creativelive SUV. So I convinced them to also drive away from our close parking spot just to not be distracting. Um, so you can see all around and see down now. Fabian did was went in, fix the bottom a little bit. It's not so bad here. Got the top. Uh, so it looks great. Um, no. Look all around, and it feels like you really are there. It feels like you're standing with signs enjoying the sunrise. Um, now this is all playing video, right? Timecode, Still rolling, cars driving by, um, and I have hidden. We'll see and see me in the shop. And this is going to give us sort of that beginning of a story, right? Sunrise, Iconic symbol of the beginning of a new story. So that's why we decided to start with this this shot at Tilden Park. So this is Ah, this is the footage from our first shot of the morning. And I think, um, I think you get the idea. We just allow it to really capture the expansiveness of the space, captured the light, um, and captured this sort of early morning crowd that comes to the park. We wanted to show that not only are we in nature, but we're sort of exiting society and entering a new a new space. I think that's really important. Start your chapter with some context. So that's that's this shot. And up next, we'll sort of start walking down the path. Here we are in Tilden Park at Inspiration Point. It's really important to make sure you allow your audience better understand where they are. Giving people a sense of place is very important. It gives them it sort of grounds them in a space that grounds them in this reality. And as we take people in this virtual tour on a walk in the woods, um, want people to kind of remember that there somewhere important but they are in a place that's magical, that they're in a place that's inspiring. So I think, you know, we want to set the tone that this is gonna be kind of a mindful piece is gonna be a piece where you're gonna have a meditative tone to it. Um and so what better way to set that expectation than to start with a shot of ah, of the inspiration point Sign here until the park rolling on video. Now ruling on audio. Okay, so now we hide. All right, We did it. It's beautiful. Hey, it's our crew. Ah, the creative live crew. Beautiful people. All right, so we'll start this week Unjust spin our viewpoint around. Um, here I am, sitting at the shot clapping. We saw me clap earlier. I mean, you go hide, okay? And that's important. You always gotta hide now, You know, if I peek out like that, the audience is gonna see me now. In this case, we all went ahead further cause we wanted to get everybody hiding eso that the shot works. You can see up in the air all around. Here's all of us getting pretty well hidden. There behind trees. All right, beautiful. Well hidden. Um, So here's our sort of scene setting moment. Now, we Now our audience really knows where we are, really understands the value of this place value that clearly society is placed on this place, which, which includes sign egx. Um, so, uh, it was a really lucky morning. We got great light. And, um, here we are buffering, um, but you can kind of get a sense of what happens when how the production flows from from setting up the shot pressing record to then actually, the moments of the shot where were hidden and even on ah, buffering frame on YouTube, you can still every frame is actually a sphere instead of being just just a rectangle. So even if it's stuck on a frame, you can look all around that frame they were hiding. So, really, this is the other side of that parking lot. Earlier, we were over there kind of on the edge, in the distance. And now we're over here, right by the sign and the entrance point to the parking lot and, um, you know, and parking lots really air quotes. I mean, this is a pretty rustic, sort of look on feel and so we're just making our way. I'm tryingto, you know, allow the audience to start at the sunrise. They park their car and as they walked to get to the trail the pass This beautiful sign that just illustrates how important of a place this is. Okay, so But I want everyone to think about is that this device? This device allows people to be transported, okay. And you get to put yourself in the shoes of this device to get to know your audience in the shoes of this device. Um, this device becomes their eyes and their ears. Ah, it becomes their height. So if it's low to the ground, your audience is gonna feel like they're sitting, which is totally fine. And maybe your audience will be sitting when they watch the peace. Um, in this case, as we're doing a walk in the woods, I wanted to keep it at sort of a walking height. Um, and this is a cool opportunity. We have this sort of path. We've got these beautiful tall trees, which is very important because in our real estate that we have to work with in VR in 3 60 is so much bigger than the real estate we have to work with in sort of a flat e. Um, all of a sudden, we need to fill that space with things that are interesting to look at. We need to fill that space with things that add value that add sort of, ah, the essence of a place having trees reaching over you. When you're in the headset for your audience, when those trees air reaching over you can a peeing you you know that is a powerful feeling at the same time. That's just an aesthetic. Um, that's just sort of icing on the cake. What we're really doing here is conceptually we're thinking about our audience as this camera, okay, making its way through the woods, a walk in the woods. And now we're here. We are on this path. We have an opportunity to film it in 3 60 we can choose in the edit if we want to have the audience feel like they're walking uphill by starting the shot with due North facing uphill. Or if we want the audience to feel like they're walking downhill right And so all of a sudden in the edit, we would rotate the sphere so that the due north was facing down Hill. Um, we could decide that later. It's pretty easy to rotate that sphere in post. Um, the way we do it on this camera is I mark, camera one. Camera one is sort of Ah, my guide. As I look at the footage, uh, in the computer, I can see the thumbnails. And I'm looking at the thumbnail where every time the thumbnail has camera one in the center and then the cameras over here on the sides, right of my frame of mind, sort of flattened globe, right. The map of the shots we get back and eso using camera one as sort of your primary lens. Um, helps you identify shots later. So we're going to use camera one, and we're gonna pointed uphill because there might be something beautiful about kind of the struggle that is walking uphill during a hike. You know, even though we're gonna use this in a spot, having a walk in the woods is only satisfying because there's highs and lows. Um, if it if it was all easy and it was always downhill. Um, it might not have the same feeling the same time again. Easy to switch, but we're going to start with a primary lens pointing up for this rig. All of the cameras or synchronized. So we just need to turn on the front camera, camera one and everything. Ah ah should turn on. I'm gonna turn on the microphone at the same time. There we go. All the cameras have. Come on. Um, I just do a quick lens check to make sure it's not like too many smudges or anything weird. All seems good. Okay. And so now we're gonna do is I'm gonna press record on the 1st 1 All of them will record. I'm in a press record on the microphone, going to clap twice. Don't really need to clap with this camera because it's, ah, frame specific. So they're all sink up to the exact frame when oppressor quarter on one, they all start frame. One will start in the same moment in time. Um, as opposed to a more of a homemade rig. They won't be sync up like that. Ah, but ah, but I clap anyway, just for safety to make it easy with sound, So you'll be sinking the spikes later. Um, so we'll press record on both devices, and then I'll clap and then we run. Okay. Great. Now we can look at that shot. Now that we've stitched and uploaded it, you can see what that shot looks like. Here's our top. Here's me clapping Can see my hands here. Um, here's the creativelive crew. No one can always see you guys. 3 60 We can all see you. All right. And I've run. I'm running down the hill running away because we turn this around, We'll see these guys hopefully will also run. Eventually we get the creativelive crude ahead. Downhill in this shop can begin. Um, now, usually we record. Ah, a few minutes. A few extra minutes of footage. You know, we recorded the beginning before everyone is away from the camera. We rule for a while, and then we come back and stop it down. And what that allows us to do, um, is really find the perfect 32nd moment or the perfect 45 2nd moment toe add to our edit. Um, we want to make sure we don't just record for 45 seconds because, you know, there might be allowed bird or something we don't want in the shot. Or maybe a by standard walks by and And that bystander, you know, sort of disrupts our shot or are seen, and so having it rolling for for a few minutes is really valuable, actually, um, you can see really well what I meant when I was talking about the kind of that idea of being surrounded by tall trees here, a Z scroll around, Um, you can look down going to see the blurring that that camera provides. Um, that's our experience, this shop. And so now we'll keep making our way around, uh, around Tilden Park and, um, and so enjoy the walk.

Class Description

Imagine a world where you can create a product for your client where they are immersed in a memory or place; a bride & groom that are able to relive the feeling of their first kiss, a real estate agent that can place clients in their virtual home, a journalist that can transport a viewer in a small village in a foreign country. That world is here, and it’s growing quickly. 


360 Live-Action is a form of photography and videography that allows the viewer to see an entire world. With social channels like Facebook and YouTube adopting ways to publish this medium, the creative world has exploded with new opportunities to share new immersive stories. 

Barry Pousman has been playing with virtual reality for years. His stories and media have been used by such organizations as the U.N. and Google to evoke empathy in viewers with the hope of creating a positive behavioral change. In this course, Barry will introduce you to the world of possibilities created by 360 and VR.
You’ll learn:

  • What exactly VR and 360 Live-Action are and the history behind each of them
  • How you can get started in photography and videography to create stories in 360 Live-Action
  • How to develop, plan, shoot, and stitch together a story in 360 Live-Action
  • How you can enter the market place and participate in the growing world of VR and 360 

Reviews

user-5f6365
 

Great content! Great overview on storytelling and an intro to 360.