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Exporting Photos from Lightroom

Lesson 12 from: Landscape Photo Editing with Adobe Lightroom Classic

Philip Ebiner

Exporting Photos from Lightroom

Lesson 12 from: Landscape Photo Editing with Adobe Lightroom Classic

Philip Ebiner

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Lesson Info

12. Exporting Photos from Lightroom

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Lesson Info

Exporting Photos from Lightroom

Before we close out this course, I want to show you how to export your photos from lightroom. If you don't know how to do so already here are all our edited photos. Lots of great ones. I hope that at this point in the course, you feel confident in knowing how to use lightroom to edit photos, specifically landscape photos. And that when you go out and take photos of your own, you know exactly how to go back and edit them. Now how do we export them? So you can export them individually by just clicking one of them and then going to the export menu or you can select multiple by selecting one and then shift, clicking the next one or selecting one and control or command clicking. If you're using a Mac, the ones that you want to export or if you have all the ones in your photo strip down here that you want to edit export, you can just press command a to select all of them. I have this filtered to five stars and above because I've given a rating to all of my edited photos as five stars. I'm in...

the library. Tab, you could also be in the development mo module. It doesn't matter because what you're going to want to do is go up to file export on a Mac. It's shift command, E is the keyboard shortcut. And now we have the window for exporting our files. Uh quick overview. The first one is the location. So typically this is going to be to a specific folder. So you click choose and then that opens up a window where you choose the folder you want to export to or there's some fast ones like desktop pictures, folder, et cetera. Next is the file naming con convention. So here we have uh you can choose a custom name, for example, uh we can call this landscape photos and maybe actually what I'll do just so you can see I'll put this in on the desktop and I'll put it in a sub folder for landscape edits. OK? So file naming landscape photos and then it's just going to create a sequence. Typically, what I'll do is create a sequence and right there, it'll start with number one and then go to 2345. However, you want, you could also just name it as the file name itself if you want to keep it as the file name, video, skip that we're not doing anything with video. So next is the file settings. Here's where you choose a format. JPEG is a great format for posting online sharing online if you're posting to Instagram Facebook, any sort of photo sharing site, putting it on your website JPEG is a great file type because the size is going to be small over on the right hand side, you have this quality slider, I would just leave it at 100 so that it's the best quality. If you do have a specific file size limit that you want to keep it under, you check this box and then you type a number. So this is 5000 kilobytes. So if you need it to be, so that's five megabytes. So if you need it, for example, on your website to be a little bit smaller file size, maybe you need it to be under 200 that's gonna be quite compressed. But you want your photos to be pretty small if they're on a website um unless it's like a portfolio and you really need them to be high quality. Um I would limit it definitely under 1000. Um But that something to play around with depending on your website and internet speed and all that. If you're just posting to somewhere like Facebook or Instagram, I would leave that off Facebook and Instagram and all these websites are going to compress your photos somehow. But I'd rather start with the full quality file. Now, printing from a printing your photos is also another topic, printing a JPEG photo is should be a fine uh It, it will be a good quality. Um I typically just print my photos out as JPEG. But if you want the highest quality or like a print shop, uh they might ask for a Tiff file, so you would just set it as Tiff. Um And depending on the print shop, depending on uh the printer, everything, they'll tell you if they need a different color space, I would just leave this as is, but generally you'll be fine getting away with this just editing or exporting as a JPEG. Now, this is the quality and file size. The next one is image size. So typically I would have this checked off and the resolution you can set to whatever you want. But 150 is a typical resolution for uh prints or for posting online 300 is sort of the higher end anything above 300. At this point. Most phones cam laptops, computer screens, you won't really be able to tell the difference. Um But uh you can also go down to 72 if you are trying to save um space or file size and that kind of thing too. Uh or just in terms of resolution, depending on how big the photo is going to be displayed. 150 is fine. Um in terms of the pixel width or height, uh this is also something that comes in handy. If you are specifically creating a photo for a specific use, maybe you're putting it in an email or you're putting it on uh youtube as a thumbnail and you only need it or want it to be, for example, 1920 pixels wide, then you would put your width there. And then if this is set to width and height, then and you leave the height blank, then it's just going to make the height match whatever the right height is for the aspect ratio you have said it to. So if it's for example, a square image, then the height would end up being 1920 pixels. If it's a 16 by nine image, like I edited a lot of my photos uh in lightroom, the width will be 1080 pixels and these are just aspect ratios that I know because video production and common uses for these pixels typically though, unless you want to have a specific width or height, I would leave that off and it's not even going to uh adjust this at all. There's this last one output sharpening. Um Sometimes you may want to add a little bit of sharpening for your print uh sometimes and this is a good thing to test your your own photos because every camera is different and depending on um how much sharpening you added within your edit, you may want to check this on sharpen four and I typically uh print on map photo or map paper and I just use the standard, but I would do some tests yourself. Um And just see what looks good. I there's also a sharpen for screen, but I would just leave that off because you've probably added some sharpening in your photo anyways. Uh The last one that you might be interested in is the watermark. So if you check that on and then you click edit watermarks, it's going to open up a little window and you could add your name or even a logo over here with this option and you can change everything here. It's pretty self explanatory. Uh You could change the size, you could change the position, all that kind of thing if you are interested in doing that. And if you click this drop down up here, you can actually save it as a preset so that in the future, you can always just simply use your preset and it will apply that watermark on your photos personally. I'm not a fan of watermarks. I think they detract from the photo and it's pretty easy to crop out or even remove with a clone tool if someone's trying to steal your photo. And that's why people typically use watermarks is to prevent that sort of uh theft of their photos. And I totally get that. But in terms of sharing your work or especially printing, I would definitely leave the watermark off. And then this last post processing is just what happens. Uh if you want after exports to show up in the finder, if you don't want anything to happen. If you want to open up in Photo Photoshop itself, you can do that, then you'll just click export, you'll see up in the top left that there's this progress bar and as it starts to go, it'll start to go through and when it's done, it's done and then it will open up all these files in finder. All right. So it popped up this folder on my desktop. So here we have all of our exported photos, great quality. And now I'm gonna go print and share some of them. Awesome. I hope you enjoyed this lesson and I hope you've enjoyed this course. If you have any questions, let us know, but otherwise we'll see you in the next video and hopefully in another course.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials

Practice_Photos_for_Landscape_Editing_Course.zip

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