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Step 4 - Editing Your Photos

Lesson 49 from: Launch a Successful Photography Business

Philip Ebiner, Will Carnahan

Step 4 - Editing Your Photos

Lesson 49 from: Launch a Successful Photography Business

Philip Ebiner, Will Carnahan

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Lesson Info

49. Step 4 - Editing Your Photos

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1: Introduction to Starting a Photography Business

1

Welcome

02:26
2

Why Do You Want to Start a Photography Business

04:40
3

What Kind of Photography Business Do You Want to Start

05:38
4

Important Personal Note from Instructor Will

02:25
5

Case Study Starting a Photography Business

07:43
6

Quiz - Chapter 1

Chapter 2: Basics of Starting a Photography Business

7

Introduction to Basics of Starting a Photography Business

00:52
8

Choose Your Business Name

05:29
9

Choose Your Business Structure

06:12
10

Register Your Business Name

01:47
11

Get Your Federal Tax ID

01:39
12

Get Your Business License

01:16
13

Get Your Business Bank Account

02:16
14

Register Your Online Accounts

02:17
15

Branding Your Business

02:18
16

Set Your Prices

12:56
17

The Photography Gear You Need to Start a Business

03:42
18

Case Study - Business Basics

24:42
19

Case Study - Equipment

10:05
20

Quiz - Chapter 2

Chapter 3: Get Your First Paying Clients

21

Intro to Getting Your First Paying Clients

00:44
22

You Need to Prove Yourself

01:30
23

The Best Place to Find Your First Clients

02:36
24

What to Charge for Your First Clients

02:44
25

On Set - Partnering with Other Creatives

01:57
26

On Set - Getting Work in a Competitive Environment

02:38
27

Use Your First Shoot Wisely

01:20
28

Case Study - Getting Your First Clients

07:55
29

Quiz - Chapter 3

Chapter 4: Create Your Photography Business Website

30

Introduction to Create Your Photography Business Website

01:05
31

Why You Need a Website and Platform Options

04:30
32

What Needs to Be On Your Website

07:32
33

Design the Perfect Portfolio

03:17
34

Case Study - Looking at Photography Websites

12:56
35

Quiz - Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Expanding Your Online Presence

36

Introduction to Expanding Your Online Presence

00:55
37

Use Instagram to Grow Your Business

02:29
38

Use Facebook to Grow Your Business

01:21
39

Get Listed on Google

03:53
40

Get Listed on Yelp

03:20
41

Get Listed on Review Sites

04:06
42

Using Craigslist to Get Work

03:01
43

Case Study - Expanding Your Online Presence

13:16
44

Quiz - Chapter 5

Chapter 6: The Photography Business Workflow

45

Introduction to the Photography Business Workflow

00:54
46

Step 1 - Meeting Your Client

03:32
47

Step 2 - Booking Your Client

05:53
48

Step 3 - The Shoot

02:28
49

Step 4 - Editing Your Photos

06:34
50

Step 5 - Delivering Your Photos

01:05
51

Case Study - Business Workflow

15:54
52

On Set - the Shoot

02:50
53

On Set - Backdrop Placement

01:13
54

On Set - Paper Backdrop Rolls

02:01
55

On Set - The Back Light

00:46
56

On Set - Interacting with Clients

04:58
57

Quiz - Chapter 6

Chapter 7:Scaling Your Business with Better Infrastructure

58

Intro to Business Infrastructure and Continued Growth

00:46
59

Productivity Tools to Make Your More Efficient

06:21
60

Get Business Insurance

03:55
61

Accounting Tools & Tips

04:20
62

Business Tax Tips

03:38
63

Scaling Your Prices Up

02:56
64

Use Conventions and Meet Ups to Grow Your Business

04:01
65

Case Study - Business Growth

11:04
66

Quiz - Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Selling Your Prints

67

Intro to the Selling Prints Section

00:56
68

Why Should You Sell Your Prints

02:18
69

Choose a Printer

02:59
70

How to Price Your Prints

05:33
71

Selling Your Prints Online

08:06
72

Selling Your Prints in Person

02:38
73

Wrapping up This Section

01:26
74

Quiz - Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Conclusion

75

Tips for Personal and Creative Well Being

04:38
76

Conclusion

01:45

Final Quiz

77

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

Step 4 - Editing Your Photos

Step four editing your photos or post. I like to call this post. That's how I call it in my workflow. So you shot you've come home from, you know your headshot session, your portrait, session, your family, session, your corporate event, your wedding. Um The first thing I do is I download my card to two different spots and personally I have an archived redundant hard drive of all my photography I just dump raw photos onto. And then I have a working solid state drive that I travel around with on my laptop. So I've taken that card and I've dumped them to both spots and I leave them on the card. Now I've gotten to the point where I can afford to have multiple SD cards. I have probably like six or 728 gig cards, which is a lot and it's expensive and you may not get to that point yet, but I don't format a card after I've been done shooting until both drives have been downloaded and I've uploaded the proofs to my online gallery there, then backed up three different times. Um Then I will then ...

format the card and this came, this is I've had problems where I've had hard drives crash and this will happen to you. So keep in mind that that's my sort of workflow for post editing. Got them downloaded. Now I use Lightroom. There are plenty of different products that you can use for post editing an organization. I tend to have different catalogs in lightroom for my different photography. So I have a wedding catalog. I have a headshots catalog and I have a personal catalog. Um that's how I organize. And then within each one I organized by the job. So they'll be, you know, the epner wedding will be in one catalog and within that will be all my organization for all my photos from my headshots, I'll have the model and the actor, actress and within that I have a proof section and edited section and a select section or something like that. So that's how I organize and I work all of that off of I usually have my little SD drive. I don't work off of my backup archive drive where all my photos are ever. Usually it's too slow to do that. But also it just scares me. So now you've got all your photos organized, you've got them imported, you've moved them off your SD cards, your SD cards in your bag, ready for your next shoot, your editing lightroom, you've done, you've uploaded your photos. Where are you uploading your photos to? The workflow is different for me for every project. So let's start with weddings with weddings. I've found that if you show your couple too many photos and ask them to choose your photos, they will never get back to you because chances are all your photos are great. So instead of going through and deleting all the out of focus over and underexposed photos and showing them 1000 photos, having them pick 200. I now just pick the 200 for them. And then I will go into lightroom, I will pick out the 200 and then I will start editing them individually now for an event, like a corporate event, a wedding, any sort of big event. I really don't spend more than 30 seconds to a minute editing each photo. I just go through to make sure that they look great. The exposure is nice and it's consistent Now with a wedding, I tend to pick 10-20 really great photos and then I'll spend you know 10-20 minutes on each one of those photos. And again this depends on the package that they ordered with head shots and portraits. Uh and you know sit down sessions, family portraits like that. I will then have our couple or are people choose what photos they want? So for a typical headshot session with one or two looks I'll end up shooting Between 400 and 800 photos total. I'll end up showing them 100 and they'll end up picking about 5-10. And those are the ones that I edit. The way I do. That is like all the photos into my light room, go through all of them, Whittle them down to the 100 that I show them. I upload them to Zen folio and we'll talk about that in a sec. I send the gallery off to them. They send back their five picks, I download those, edit those, Upload them back to them, send them the link, they now have their photos. We'll go over more of this in the case study. So there's multiple ways of sharing your proofs. You can just put your proofs in a cloud based file sharing program, like Dropbox, ICloud google and send them off. The problem is you don't really have a lot of control over that. Sometimes your clients may download all of them and take them and edit them yourselves, which, you know, is something we can talk about. Or you can use a photography based website. Something like zen folio, Zen folio. I actually buy the top tier and I really love it because I'm able to upload the raws for one. I'm also able to upload the proofs, send a gallery with or without watermarks and they can actually pick their favorites, create an account and send it back to me. Zen folio allows you to download the list of photos that they pick or proof that they pick, and you can import that into your lightroom. Lightroom will then pick those out and they'll be right there ready for me to edit. This is really great because then I don't have to go through and look for the numbers that they've picked and match and drag and move stuff over. Um Again, it costs a little money, but to be honest, I think it's totally worth it. If you start shooting that many photos and you'll start to see as you start to collect thousands and thousands of photos as you shoot. Another great thing with a photo centric website is that you're able to create watermarks. This is a big controversy and I think we've talked about this in the photography and friends facebook group quite a bit. Um but watermarks are really useful for me during proofing for portraits and headshots, not necessarily weddings and stuff like that, but I've had times where I'll put up proofs for an actor, actress, they love them so much. They start screen shotting them and they'll start posting them even though they're not edited yet. They're just proofs and then they'll tag you in them and so now it looks like your your your photo that's been screenshot at a low rez that has not been edited is a representation of your work. That's not necessarily what you want. So sometimes having a watermark when you're showing proofs is super helpful to protect yourself from exposing other clients to potentially seeing your work. That's not of the quality that you want it to be at. Other times, watermarks may be kind of annoying because you're trying to showcase your work, but in this instance it's there to protect your quality of image from other people sharing it. Step four is really about creating your workflow for editing and that really takes some time to sort of figure out what works best for you. Sometimes it's worth spending the extra money on a photo center site or an organization program like Lightroom. Uh, It will also allow you to whittle down your hours or expand your hours based on how you want to do your pricing.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

15 Tips: How Your Photography Business can be Adapted to Online Services
Start a Photography Business
Workbook
Worksheet

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