Lifestyle Newborn Photography - In the Home

Lesson 26 of 42

In-Home Shoot: Family with Newborn

 

Lifestyle Newborn Photography - In the Home

Lesson 26 of 42

In-Home Shoot: Family with Newborn

 

Lesson Info

In-Home Shoot: Family with Newborn

The shot list. We're gonna go ahead and go over shot lists for family, mom, dad, sibling, dogs, and creative shots. Okay, so we're gonna show the next video. We're gonna actually probably get the dog shot on his bed. Let's get the whole family piled in here for one shot with the dog. Then we're gonna head into his room because there's more light. Okay. No shit there's more light. There's softer light. We can take the collar off if you don't like it. That is up to you. It depends if you want it or not. That's fine, either way. We're okay now in here. That's fine. We're gonna leave... Okay. Alright, I'm just gonna... We don't need, I'm just gonna see what happens again. I think that's still too bright over here, isn't it? Yeah. Yeah, we're just gonna leave the one. Okay, everybody pile up, and the puppy. Does this easily come out of the window? It does. Would you mind if we took it out? That'll give us some light coming from this direction. Sorry, is that okay? Hey look a...

t that, it fills up the light a little bit. We had a little bit of a dark shadow. Perfect, there we go. We should have done that a long time ago. Alright, everybody pile up on the couch. Dog included. Come on Kona. Kona let's go over here. It's hard for me not to teach as I'm watching this. She wants to sit by Daddy? Yeah of course. Have him lay on your lap if you can. Come here. Lay down right here. Oh my gosh what a good puppy. Alright climb up there by Mommy, honey. Go by Mommy. This is the one time it's okay. Go by Mommy. There we go. Everybody hug. Everybody snuggle. Kona. Kona. Don't look at me until I tell ya. Dads are always the lookers. That is so, can you pull the baby's head up a little for me? Kona, Kona. Alright. Here, come here you. We're losing ya. Here sit right there for me. Snuggle your sister. Right there. Okay, ready? Everybody look at the baby. Kona. Kona, Kona. Okay. What's over here? Come on, what's over here? There we go, everybody look at the baby. Call Kona, Mom, and then keep looking at the baby for me. (whistles) (shutter clicks) Look at your sister. What's on her head? A butterfly? Is there a butterfly? Look over here. Look at your sister. Oh are you smelling my head? Hey look at your sister. Does she have a little milk on her. Hey can you look at Daddy? Daddy's gonna make a silly face. Look at Daddy. Cabe look at my silly face. Hey Cabe, Cabe, guess what. Does Daddy have ice cream on his nose? Does Daddy have ice cream on his nose? Look! Look at Daddy! (laughs) Cute. Okay, good job. Alright I want to get, right there, stay right there for me. (shutter clicks) Mkay can you look at your sister for me? What's on her head? What's on her head? That way. There you go, look at her. There we go. Everybody look at the baby. Kona. We're good. Alright, perfect. Okay, we're gonna get Kona with, first baby shot. (laughs) That was funny right? What a good puppy. Such a good puppy. Okay I want to talk about a few things about that. Here's some images, and you're gonna see some. We don't see the whole video of all of these things happening. You can see there's one shot from that segment, okay. These other ones were done in the bedroom, which we'll see in a little bit, but that dog was amazing. So as you guys saw, I made them move the antenna out of the window because what was happening we were completely back lit, and that's the only spot in the house that I was able to fit the family on besides the bed with the son's bed. So I wanted to show you guys some ideas for that, okay. So there was a tiny little window so I popped out the satellite sticky thing on the window and it worked perfectly, okay. This is a typical interaction with a family. He was two, okay. As you saw he was counting his fingers for life because he's just learned how to count. Right? So what else are you gonna do as a two year old but count your fingers when you learn how to count? Okay, I have never told so many white lies in my life until I became a photographer. There's ice cream on your head. There's a butterfly on your nose, and I feel kind of bad about it, but it works, and they look, and then they forget. Okay? So it worked. What I want to say about this, you kept hearing me call the dog. The dog was like looking off into space, and the family was already interacting, okay. They were all interacting. Nobody was looking at me. The dog was the one that was looking randomly at the film crew, okay. So I needed the dog to look at me. I chose that the dog was gonna be the person that was connecting with me. I do a lot of dogs and families, and I've found this to work the best. Then what I do, you noticed how Mom was turned towards the baby. Kona was still looking off into space cause it's like a two year old dog, so it's like a two year old but in dog form. So kona was looking this way. I had Mom still looking at the baby. So I said, "Mom while you're looking at the baby, "can you call the dog's name?" okay? "And then smile." So what she did was she was smiling at the baby, everybody was looking at the baby, I mean after I manually turned his head, right, because sometimes you have to, and he and I were buddies by that point, so we were comfortable. She called Kona. The dog looked at Mom. Everybody was already looking at the baby, and I got the shot, okay. So you have to think about who do you, you have to be a director. Okay. Who am I gonna direct? What story am I trying to tell? Where do I want everyone to be looking? This isn't pile everybody on the couch and just let it go, you know. That works sometimes. More likely than not, Dad will look at you and smile. That doesn't ever work. It doesn't work. So you have to kind of, you see I was gently directing. I said, "everybody pile on the couch." I did not say, "Dad you sit here. "Mom you sit here. "Okay, little guy, you sit here. "Dog's gonna sit here." Okay. I let them get on the couch and let them get natural. Okay, now if they were apart from each other, I'd say, "Let's scooch your bottoms together. "Everybody needs to be touching." I like Mom and Dad's hips to be touching. Everybody needs to be connected. So that's the time where you gently direct them, but I don't force where I'm putting them. Does this all make sense? Okay. So that's kind of what happened. He was kind of looking that direction. That was just one of the angles that I took, and we are going to be going through and showing you some of these images, more of them, later when while going through editing at the end of the, at the end of the show. Okay? This is i had them stand in front of the window back lit. This is at a time where I had not taken out that thing on the side. Can you guys picture where this is now? That bottom black and white image. And they're connected. I like that because they're connected. That's a good time to backlight. A lot of people will say, "Oh but it's not "a true silhouette because the couch is in the middle." There's nothing you can do, let it go. I cannot crop that couch out. I am not about to do that in photoshop. That would just be torture. It's fine. Parents don't know that it's annoying to have a couch behind them when you're silhouetting, only we do, okay. Let that go. This right here, a little bit different of composition. We can see what they're doing, but the focus is on the baby. Okay. Same up here. We're going to see a little bit of video I believe in the kiddo's bedroom. Do you see the green walls, the green everything? Nikons pull green as well, so within my camera, I actually have my color bumped over to magenta a little bit. So if you're a Nikon user and you find that happening, you can go into your camera settings and actually do that.

Class Description

"This will sound sappy but I feel like this class changed my life." - Ambrai5, CreativeLive Student 

"This class is worth every dollar spent, every minute used, and especially every soul-wrenching moment you take to delve deeper into your why and your what and your how." - Kerry K, CreativeLive Student

Documenting the first days and weeks of a newborn baby is often as stressful for the photographer as it is for the parent. Knowing how to handle the baby, capture all that is in your shot list, and keep tired parents calm and happy is often overwhelming. Join Emily Lucarz, as she walks you through how get started in newborn photography by taking the photo session into your client’s home. Emily’s passion for newborn photography will teach how to incorporate not only items in the home into your photography, but also how to capture natural moments that document real memories in the baby's first few weeks. She’ll cover: 

  • How to photograph in natural light no matter how dark or bright the room is 
  • Prepping the parents before you get there so your photoshoot is relaxed 
  • Poses and safety tips that work great for the newborn baby and for the family 
  • Incorporating young siblings into your session 
  • Marketing yourself as you grow your clientele and your portfolio 
  • Pricing and Sales that don’t overwhelm new parents 

By the end of this course, you’ll have the tools and techniques to capture images that are not only memories but become art in your client’s home.  

"As a newborn photographer with an established studio business model, I cannot wait to infuse what I have learned into my style and incorporate her business genius into my session and pricing structure." -Jenn M, CreativeLive Student

"I have been struggling in my area with marketing lifestyle sessions as it's just not big here yet. Feeling a little down and wondering if I should keep going. This class not only got me out of my slump, but it also gave me the direction I needed." - BALPhoenix Photography, CreativeLive Student

Reviews

JennMercille
 

Oh my goodness!!! This was such a wonderful class. Not only is Emily a very gifted pro, she is the personable mentor that makes learning simple and the fun big sis you want to be around. She is a wealth of information and a total open book about it all. Being in her studio audience was so much fun, and the time flew by way too fast. I highly recommend this class not only to newbies trying to find their style and refine their technique, but also to seasoned pros looking to tweak their art with a creatively authentic perspective. As a newborn photographer with an established studio business model, I cannot wait to infuse what I have learned into my style and incorporate her business genius into my session and pricing structure. Thank you Emily Lucarz for sharing your creativity, knowledge and uplifting energy with us both in the class and behind the scenes! You are awesome!

Jessie Fultz
 

Buy this course! If you are at all interested offering lifestyle newborn sessions, whether you are a new photographer or you have been in business for years, buy it! It's 100% worth your time and money and you won't regret it. Emily is so fun and genuine which makes learning from her such a joy! Not only does this course go over troubleshooting different scenarios that are bound to happen during some sessions, but Emily also gives all sorts of other tips that you wouldn't even know you needed to know until she offers up the advice. It's fun to watch her interact with her clients to ensure that she is able to make beautiful pictures in such a natural setting. Thank you Emily and CreativeLive for coming together to make this course happen! I am beyond thrilled that I was able to watch these last two days and learn SO much!!

Hiba Alvi
 

Emily is amazing! I love how detailed she is and tells you how it is. It is nice she shares her personal journey and what she does - which is great! Love it and would highly recommend this course! I don't have a studio, and normally travel to clients home to do photoshoots - so all the tips here are more than helpful! I am so excited to do my upcoming photo session this weekend - can't wait to put these tips to use!