In-Home Shoot: Pet with Newborn

 

Lifestyle Newborn Photography - In the Home

 

Lesson Info

In-Home Shoot: Pet with Newborn

Next up, we're gonna do pets, so, in particular, this pet, this Weimaraner, bigger dogs are more difficult to use in photo shoots, putting them next to a baby, because they have longer nails, and they have longer legs, so you have to think about focal planes. If you want the dog's face and the baby's face in the same focal plane, what's gonna happen to the legs of the dog? They're all phalanges all over, right? Right in front of you. And you have these, like, for lack of another word, phalanges, for lack of another word, but then you're having all of this focal plane nonsense going on. So the longer dogs are trickier, and so sometimes what I'll do is I'll have them facing each other this way. Focal planes, right, depending on the pet. We've talked about this in length, about safety. Not gonna tackle it again, but you already know how I feel about that. Those dogs are really good to have dad hold, okay. So let's go ahead and watch this video, and I'll show you how we did it. How comfort...

able are you with her and the puppy? Do you trust her? We don't really know yet. She's great. Yeah, she's great. You're comfortable? Yeah, she's great with the baby. If you could do me a favor and just sit right here. Okay. I'll be the trainer, he's the-- Well, I've got cheese. Well here you go, if you need more. I'm gonna put this over here because I don't want too much. This is like good cheese. I know. This is like, deli cheese. We're gonna pull her back a little bit. Okay. C'mere, actually, she's okay, well, we're gonna scoot her back up, c'mere Kona, up! Okay back up, and you get over there. Alright, come here Kona, come here come here. Down, lay down, lay down, lay down, good girl. So she doesn't, try to eat the cheese when I place the baby. Yeah (laughs). Alright stay. Stay. Stay. Alright, if we can, I'm gonna move her paw, there we go. I don't want her paw, stay, stay. Stand up for me. Stay, stay, Kona, Kona, stay (camera clicks). We got her smiling. Alright Kona, right there, kisses. Kona, good girl, now give her a little piece of cheese. I'm gonna move her back a little bit. Somebody has to always stay right here with dogs, okay? Right there, stay, good girl, stay. Move your hand for me, stay Kona, Kona (Camera clicks). Can we open that sheer a little bit, or that shade a little bit, get rid of the problem of, yeah, there we go. Normally I don't like this much light but I don't want to have to worry about the dog and the shadow. So typically we put the baby in between the dogs feet but I'm not going to go do that with her nails. Okay, kisses, can you point towards her head for me? Okay, you can move your hand. That's actually okay, she's being really cute. You got the dog, okay? Kona, Kona, Kona (camera clicks). (laughs) Just the fact that they are next to each other makes me happy. Okay so we had tried for a long time. What you did not see, we were trying to get Kona to lie down, she's actually a very well trained dog. Very well trained dog. That's the only reason that this was happening. If this dog was not that well trained, we would not be doing this, okay? A couple rules of thumb with pets. Dad had cheese, mom had cheese, I had cheese. What you didn't see happen was that I took it away, okay? Because we don't want the dog jumping up. I'm the one that controls the cheese. (audience laughs) You know what I mean? I'm hot now. And the side note about the cheese, we were saying, you got like brick cheese, it's like real cheddar cheese, it's not like generic cheese, and they were saying only the best for dogs in Seattle. So, okay, back to the dog, y'all are throwing me. So, I was trying, focus, I was trying to get the dog to bring his head down. I'm a dog person, I know how to deal with dogs, okay. It's calm energy, I have to bring myself down a little bit. And once you get the shot, just like a baby, just like a sibling, you don't say okay we're all done! Because what's gonna happen with the dog? They're gonna jump, and the babies right there. You can't do that, you bring the treat to the dog. And if you sense that that dog is about to get up, you give them a treat, no matter what, even if they haven't done anything good, okay? You don't want the dog moving. If you have any inkling at all with dogs, if they're gonna move, you change your position, okay? Did you see that the baby and the dogs head were on the same focal plane? Okay that's all I wanted to get, that is it. My goal, at the beginning of this was, here are the legs, when the dogs head lies down, in between the legs, then they really are on the same focal plane? The baby's head and the dogs head right here. There was too much going on, with the filming going on, and all that, and she didn't know what to do. I did not want to risk the safety of the baby, so we got the shot, and we moved on, okay? You saw earlier with the family shot, we had Kona, the beautiful Weimaraner dog, with that adorable family, because they are just ridiculous, on their couch, right, and that was a gorgeous shot. And that's all we needed, the dog needs to be documented, but not the safety of it, okay? If you have any questions on that video. I was just wondering what your aperture was, when you were shooting the dog. Was you shooting wide open? Um, probably, typically, maybe like 2.2. Because of the dog we can't control the dog, so if I notice, you know I'm shooting at whatever I can to keep both of them in focus. And so then I was focusing on whoever was closest to me, which typically was the dog, it might've been even closer to 3.5, we'll look when we pull the images up. Okay thanks. Yeah! When it comes to, you know the family has a pet, multiple pets, does that change the amount of allotted time that you give to the session? And remind us what your kind of timing is. So typically newborn, lifestyle sessions, I take about two hours, if their siblings, I'm there typically two and a half. With a dog, yes, pets take a little bit longer. But they are so important to me, as a mom and a pet owner, that I'm fine with giving them more time, I don't charge them for time. Sometimes we get the pet shots done really quickly, and we will get one shot and move on, sometimes it can take 10 minutes and it's fine, it doesn't have to take extra time. So, I would just leave my whole morning open for shoots, so it's okay, but yeah, sometimes it takes longer. But I'm cool with it. Okay, there's the dog, the templates kinda of, his foots a little bit, his foot was there. So you can see the babies head and the dogs head was on the same focal plane, so it's probably around three something, because his feet are in focus, so it came with a little bit of wiggle room. There's the dog, this is during the family shot, okay? Just like siblings need their own pictures, dogs need their own pictures. I mean if you're a cat person, I guess a cat needs its own picture. I guess it depends on, whatever, the cat people, okay? Same thing up there, I love cats, I'm just kidding, I used to have two. Up here, this is the family one with the dog, okay? That was the same situation, I was there, and then I went and zoomed in, telling the story, and then I had to bring back the trumpet and the dog, because, that's like the picture of the day, like the trumpet and the dog, okay?

Class Description

"This will sound sappy but I feel like this class changed my life." - Ambrai5, CreativeLive Student 

"This class is worth every dollar spent, every minute used, and especially every soul-wrenching moment you take to delve deeper into your why and your what and your how." - Kerry K, CreativeLive Student

Documenting the first days and weeks of a newborn baby is often as stressful for the photographer as it is for the parent. Knowing how to handle the baby, capture all that is in your shot list, and keep tired parents calm and happy is often overwhelming. Join Emily Lucarz, as she walks you through how get started in newborn photography by taking the photo session into your client’s home. Emily’s passion for newborn photography will teach how to incorporate not only items in the home into your photography, but also how to capture natural moments that document real memories in the baby's first few weeks. She’ll cover: 

  • How to photograph in natural light no matter how dark or bright the room is 
  • Prepping the parents before you get there so your photoshoot is relaxed 
  • Poses and safety tips that work great for the newborn baby and for the family 
  • Incorporating young siblings into your session 
  • Marketing yourself as you grow your clientele and your portfolio 
  • Pricing and Sales that don’t overwhelm new parents 

By the end of this course, you’ll have the tools and techniques to capture images that are not only memories but become art in your client’s home.  

"As a newborn photographer with an established studio business model, I cannot wait to infuse what I have learned into my style and incorporate her business genius into my session and pricing structure." -Jenn M, CreativeLive Student

"I have been struggling in my area with marketing lifestyle sessions as it's just not big here yet. Feeling a little down and wondering if I should keep going. This class not only got me out of my slump, but it also gave me the direction I needed." - BALPhoenix Photography, CreativeLive Student