Lightroom® CC: Organizing Your Digital Photo Life

 

Lightroom® CC: Organizing Your Digital Photo Life

 

Lesson Info

Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Color

So I've got my Temperature and Tint, now it's time for Saturation Vibrance, now Saturation Vibrance are two different tools, that do similar things, Saturation is, takes every color and increases the vibrancy, or not the vibrancy, but the intensity of that color, so if it's blue, it gets bluer, if it's green, it gets greener and it gets thicker and at one point, if you go too far with it, it will look really gross, right, so we don't wanna do that, but watch, if I take Vibrance way up, do you see how different that is? Her skin tone is not super, super, super orange, it's a little too orange, but it's not incredibly crazy orange, so again, I'll go to Saturation at 100% and see how orange her skin is, looks very bad, right? Well, let's go all the way to set Vibrance, you see how it stays a little bit more natural, that's because they're two different tools, Saturation takes everything up saturation-wise irregardless of what it is, whereas Vibrance is an intelligent tool, that sees skin ...

tones, it looks for things that are already vibrant and brings them up, so like the trees, it's gonna at the trees and go, oh, that's green, that's trees, I wanna bring that up, so it's gonna make the greens and the blues come up, but the yellows and the oranges in her skin tone are gonna be protected, so it's gonna keep those down, so it's protecting the skin tones and it's trying to make everything else a bit more vibrant, so if I'm gonna use something to try and pump the colors in this photograph, I'm gonna use the Vibrance tool, because the Vibrance tool allows me to get a much more natural, yet beautiful color out of the photograph. Saturation is something that I use in the negative, so I always take negative down, or our Saturation down, so if I'm gonna use Saturation, it's gonna be to kind of soften the entire, overall look and notice that I'm using the two of them together, so I'm using the Vibrance and the Saturation together, take the Vibrance up, Saturation down and I get kind of a film-looking, photograph look, 'cause film was always a little more muted, unless you were using like Velvia, Provia or something like that and slide film, but that film look, the negative always, negative color film always looked a little bit softer in its color, so I can take the Saturation down, but then if you take the Vibrance up, what it does is it says, okay, we're gonna take all this down, that the whole color tones, the whole palette is gonna go down in saturation, but then I'm gonna pop the greens and the blues, so that they stick out a little bit more, so you can use the two opposite each other and it still makes a lot of sense to do, okay. So I've got my Color set the way I want and by the way, this is where you would work with black and white, so if you wanna turn this to black and white, you just click on this Black and White and now all you have access to is Temperature and Tint, because Saturation Vibrance don't make sense, if there's no color, so then the question is, well, why does Temperature and Tint make any sense, if it's black and white? And that's because all this is is a Black and White filter over the top of a color image, so the underlying color changes the Black and White, so watch what happens if I take Temperature up, see how it changes certain things, like the greens gets brighter, her face gets a little brighter, right, if I go down, see how it changes different things, 'cause the shadows are starting, her dress starts to come up a little bit more, his suit, which is kind of bluish starts to get brighter, see that, whereas if I go this way, his suit doesn't get any brighter, because his suit is mostly blue, so I can change by using the Temperature and the Tint, I can change the way the contrast looks in the Black and White image, so using Temperature and Tint under Black and White is fairly helpful, but the other thing that you should know about is in this area, there's this little wheel right here and if you click on that wheel, you get all of this, this is how you determine which colors are brighter and darker in Black and White, so you can see that you've got all of these colors, reds and blues and aquas and magentas and things like that, so I'm gonna take that and I'm gonna say, okay, let's right now it's on Auto, right, so that's what the Auto does and I'm not a real big fan of Auto, so if I double-click any of these, they just reset, you see how they reset every time you double-click, so let's just take this to zero and if we're at zero and I want say, her skin tones to brighten up, then I can just take the Orange, see that, her face tone is in the orange, so I can brighten up the oranges and maybe a little bit of the yellows, but then I can also come here and grab the greens and see how now I'm dealing with the trees, but I'm not dealing with her face at all, so I can make the Green go down and the Aqua go down and even the Blue, watch the sky up here, if I take the Blue, I know the sky is blue, I want the Blue to be darker and so see how I'm bringing in the sky now, so the sky is darkening, because it's blue, so I can take Blue and Purple and Aqua down and that helps to bring that sky in and on a black and white photograph, I'm not too concerned about being like, I don't want it to be like a dark, dark, dark, dark blue sky, I just want it to, I just want the edge of that sky to be grayish, rather than just pure white, so as a Black and White image, I can really manipulate without having to go in and brush in brightness on her face, I can bring her face out, I can drop down the shadows, I can play with the greens and the reds separately, because it's an underlying color, that I'm messing with. So, let's go back to the Color though and you see that when I go back to Color, all those settings that I just played with disappear, because now we're dealing with Color, so it goes back to the way I had things set, but look, that little circle now turns to a Color helper here, so when I'm in Color, I can change the Color of something, I can change the Hue of particular colors, I can change Saturation and I can change Luminance, so for instance, if I want her to be a little bit brighter in her skin tones, I can just take that orange Luminance up and see how I'm playing with the colors, again, same thing that I was doing with the Black and White, but now I'm looking at the colors and I'm telling it, I want my orange image or I want anything that's orange in this image to brighten up and maybe the reds as well, but I want the greens to darken, so I'm gonna take the Green and see how I'm making those trees a little bit richer and darker, so they're not quite as you know, glowing green, they're more of a rich green, so I can play with that and I can also go grab the Blue and see how I'm making the sky more blue, just by bringing that Luminance down, see that? So I've got a lot of options here inside of my Color to make my image really look the way I want it to look. Okay, so you have all these options, Temperature, Tint, Vibrance, Saturation and then you have all of these, so you can also, have you ever had a photograph or someone has just like a red nose or their whole face is like really red, cause they're sunburned or something like that? So that's the time you would go in and say, I need the Saturation of red to go down and if you just go grab Red and drag it down, that whole, the guy that looks like he's just a bright red bulb is gonna just, it'll go down, 'cause he's the only one that's bright red, promise, unless there's a Santa suit in the picture and then suddenly that will start going down too, but I'll show you the example, so if these purples here, I can, or magentas maybe more to the fact, I can, see how I dark, I can go, (laughs) they're black and white now, 'cause I removed all the color out of Magenta, so you can see that rose now has no magenta in it, so we don't wanna do that, but that gives you an idea of what you can do, so you you can play around and if I wanted to, I could say, I want those roses to be a little bit more poppy, so I can do that, I just have to make sure that their faces don't get a little bit weird, because if you take Magenta, sometimes like magenta is in your face and like little patches of magenta will show up in your face, so be careful of that. Alright, so I'm gonna leave it as is, so you understand now how to deal with your Color and you also know about this little panel here, that helps you work on targeted colors, but it's the whole photograph, it's not just that rose, it's any magenta across the whole photograph.

Class Description

When you're taking thousands of photos every year, it gets harder and harder to keep them organized, back them up and edit them. Finding a specific photo can be next to impossible, Until now! Join Jared Platt, the world's photo organizational guru, and learn how to better organize, secure, edit and share your images no matter where you are, or what screen you happen to be looking at. Jared will help you to organize your digital photography life, so keep taking those great photos of your kids, your friends and your travels. Your life is about to get a lot easier and a lot more organized!

This class is for all photo enthusiasts and new professionals who need help organizing, editing and sharing their images. Even the Professional will find many applicable lessons and tips that will improve their workflows.

Lessons

1Class Introduction
2Creative Cloud Construct
3Lightroom® Classic vs. Lightroom® CC
4Importing and Organization
5Folder and Album Creation
6Image Selection
7Connectivity and Data
8Finding Images in Lightroom® CC
9Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Light
10Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Color
11Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Effects
12Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Optics
13Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Crop and Straighten
14Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Clone and Healing Brush
15Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Gradient Tool
16Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Radial Filter and Brush Tool
17Working With Presets
18Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Geometry
19Going Beyond Lightroom® CC Into Photoshop®
20Basic Editing in Lightroom® CC: Dehaze Tool
21Photoshop® Connection
22Lightroom® CC Mobile
23Lightroom® CC - Mobile: Settings
24Lightroom® CC- Mobile: Basic Editing
25Lightroom® CC- Mobile: Localized Adjustments
26Lightroom® CC- Mobile: Curves
27Lightroom® CC - Mobile: Cropping and Gradients
28Lightroom® CC - Geometry
29Lightroom® CC : Keywords and Tracking Images
30Using Lightroom® Mobile Camera
31Lightroom® Mobile: Importing Images
32Lightroom® CC - Mobile: Color and Brightness
33Sharing Images on CC / Web / Mobile
34Sharing Images Using Adobe® Spark
35How to Use Adobe® Spark Post
36Sharing Albums in Lightroom® CC
37Editing in Lightroom® Classic
38Sharing Images From Lightroom® Classic
39Differences Between Lightroom® Classic and Lightroom® CC
40Lightroom® Classic and Lightroom® CC Q&A