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Direction of Light

Lesson 47 from: Mastering Your Digital Camera

Chris Weston

Direction of Light

Lesson 47 from: Mastering Your Digital Camera

Chris Weston

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Lesson Info

47. Direction of Light

Where the light is coming from can play a role in the dimension, depth, and texture of an image. See how changing your position in relation to the light source can dramatically change an image.

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Lesson Info

Direction of Light

the direction of light changes the way our subject appears. So I stand with my back to the sun, so the subject is front lit. I get a very flat looking image, and details such as texture is diminished. However, if I move around 90 degrees to the side, then the subject becomes side lit and that side lighting gives me shadows. And those shadows gives me form and depth. And if I continue my journey around that I'm facing directly into the sun and the subject is now backlit that I get more drama, get silhouettes. Aiken, Great rim lighting. So where we position the subject in relation to the light source completely changes the message are photograph is giving the angle of light also affect the visual outcome. Low angle light, which in summer we get in the early morning and late afternoon. The golden hours and in winter for extended periods, more like golden mornings and afternoons produces long shadows, which had dimension and depth in a scene Now in landscape photography. This might be used...

to accentuate the visual journey the viewer takes from foreground to background. It can also be used a great tension as the angle of light increases. Shadows grow shorter, visually reducing depth and flattening the scene. Now, generally speaking, this is in perfect light for Portrait's because it produces unflattering shadows. However, if the overhead light is soft, it can be used dramatic effect. Overhead lighting is also used a lot in product photography outdoors so hard overhead lighting is rarely ideal, which is the reason for the old adage never photographed during the middle of the day, of course, as you will see in the next lesson as an exception to every rule.

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Ratings and Reviews

mark jacobson
 

What a marvelous course! What a marvelous teacher! When I went to college, my father would always ask me about my professors, more than the courses themselves. He was passionate about learning and although too busy with earning an income to go beyond an undergrad degree, continued to read 50 books a year. I still remember how he'd get almost visibly excited when I'd tell him about some special professor who taught with such enthusiasm and, more than just passion, evident delight and joy in the subject. 'Ah they're the best, son. How wonderful you have such a teacher." Well, he passed away decades ago but if he were still around I'd get a kick out of telling him about Chris Weston, the 'Prof' of this course. He's one of the very special ones: a teacher who's loved and lived his vocation--his avocation--since he was a boy--and still is as excited about it now as he was then. The result: a course that seems to be more a labor of love--of pouring far more energy and thought into the details then one typically finds in these courses--than anything else. Bravo Chris! I'm already on to your next one.

user-6402bf
 

Chris is an amazing instructor who dissects theory giving amazing analogies that bring concepts to life. I have rarely been able to sit through most video course for more than a half-hour but watched this one from beginning to end. A good refresher course if you've been away from the camera for awhile or there are some concepts that still illude you. I highly recommend this course and look forward to watching his others. Thank you for the clarity and great explanations.

Sky Bergman
 

This was an amazing class. I have looked at a number of basic photography classes. This one was by far the best I have seen. Chris is an exceptional teacher. He breaks things down into digestible information and then inspires you to be creative. Thank you!

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