Skip to main content

Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 11 of 26

Building an Additive Synth: Pitch and Amp Envelopes

 

Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 11 of 26

Building an Additive Synth: Pitch and Amp Envelopes

 

Lesson Info

Building an Additive Synth: Pitch and Amp Envelopes

looking good so far. Now we start to add in all the modulation stuff. So control click built in modules Envelope. Now they're in the envelope. It's gonna interesting because we have a d S and r, which is a tactic. A sustained release. We have a d b d r, which is a tactic a break decay release. So be is break. It's just like another decay mode. Then we have attack, hold decay sustained release and then attack, Hold decay, Break decay release Really complex envelopes built into reactor, which is very, very cool. Let's try a d b d r So I run a gate to it And now I need to decide. Is this going to be what is controlling the volume, or am I going to have this control pitch or do I have one envelope that controls both? I think in this case I'm going to have it control pitch. So control click Create controls for each of the stages of the envelope. Now, whenever I say amount knob, we should instantly think multiplication. Remember anything times 00 If I want to give the amount. If I want to ch...

ange the amount, that's coming out of my envelope, then I want to multiply it by. You know, in this case we're doing pitch. So let's say four octaves. That's quite a lot. Maybe. L say just to start. No. Are we ending at an event or we ending at an audio. It looks like we're ending at event because we're going to pitch, which is log arrhythmic. So I need to convert it. Built in module auxiliary, 80 e. So I connect this now I create my multiply created control in the multiply. Call this envelope to pitch and I'll attach this. Now here's the interesting thing. Usually we talk about pitch, we can go up or we could go down in this particular case, this envelope, this pitch envelope is on Lee going up because he goes from his your value to a one value. What might be kind of cool is if we also give it the ability to flip so that our attack, instead of going up in pitch, goes down and pitch. That could be kind of cool. So how would I do that? Well, for changing a positive to a negative value, what we could do is take this multiplier here, give it three ports. And if I was looking at my synth right now, if I was looking at my panel and I wanted to change the envelope so that it went to a negative value instead of a positive value, I'd probably want something like a button, right? Hit the button and it makes it happen. So whenever I say Look at my synth press a button, I know that it's probably going to be a panel. So in the panel, I choose a button buttons air cool, so buttons have to values. We have one and zero on this particular button, but what I think I would like instead is the off value to be one and the on value to be negative one. I have to be very careful about this because this is being multiplied by everything else that's going into the multiplier. The multiplier is not like ad where just sums everything together. We have to consider every value that's going into it. So when the envelope novice set to zero, we get zero no matter what, it doesn't care. It doesn't matter what the envelope is saying or what the button is saying. It's going to be zero. But if it's up slightly like, say it's a 24 it's going up two octaves, right? But if we have a button that says negative one, then it's gonna flip. That number is going to be a negative value. And when the button is off, the button is set toe one, which effectively is nothing. It's whatever the value that happens to be in their multiplied by one. So now the on value for the button is negative one and office one, I'll name this button. I n ve N v So invert envelope. Now, of course, I've been neglecting something. I haven't been looking at my panel and I got live knobs so foolish, but I'm gonna be more foolish, and I'm gonna go to my envelope and get a view, and I'm gonna turn it on so I can view my envelope is well, and here's my panel. Ah, Okay. Well, there's my invert knob. Here's my enveloped pitch. This is all probably gonna be enveloped related stuff. There's my release que to break pull this stuff over to the right. So now we're into tuning So there's my fine tuning in my course tuning. There's my harmonic. So would you normally go split screen mode here when you're doing this? So you can see what? In this case, I haven't made similar things. Now they're all individual, so I can kind of just move him around, guy. But if I had multiple envelopes, absolutely multiple envelopes or multiple, you know, controls that have the same name or have the same function, right? Absolutely. Makes gets split screen. All right. I think I want these to be small because the thing with additive synthesis is we're making a partial. We need this partial to be a small as we can get it because they're going to be many of them. All right, so take all these folks, bring him over here. There's course tuning. That's fine tuning. There's my harmonic, Actually, harmonic should come first. Now, do you have a I want to have an amplitude envelope, Of course. So I go in here and I'm just gonna make it very standard. Amplitude envelope built in module envelope a DSR. There we go. Testy output to my amp input. Touch my gate. And I think what I'm gonna do is actually steal some of these. So there's an attack. I think this decay should work fine on this. Name it. Decay doesn't need to be one. I don't have a sustained, so create a sustained. Now, when I copy those knobs, Uh, yes, create control. It's weird. And then it's weird. I don't know what went up there. The only problem with this is that I go back to my panel of you. Some of them will be small and some of them will be large because of what I was copying. Because I was copying these and they were small. So let's go and make these small, too. And maybe for the amp. Envelope, I think I might do is just create a little text box here. This is an envelope and not even give it on envelope view. I will have the envelope view for the pitch, but not for the amp. So if I wanted to do that, I could actually go back in here. Control, click a man. I've got some weird thing happening here. It's putting this all the way at the top. There we go. Built in module panel text So in the text, you gotta functions. Uh ah. Where is it? The text is gonna be whatever you put here. So we call this amp. Envelope. So Texas free floating into your text here. Um okay. Oh, here it is. We put in an info. So it's called amp Envelope in. That is gonna have text in here That says Yep. On the Luke controls. There we go. Maybe help with these underneath. So yet again, Just another little way that we're trying to organize things. There we go.

Class Description

Let’s be real: Native Instruments’ Reaktor can be intimidating at first glance. But behind the complexity is an incredibly powerful modular synthesis environment that can create anything from synthesizers, grooveboxes, and sequencers to sample transformers, sound generators, and effects.

In Reaktor Modular Synthesis with David Earl, you’ll learn how to tweak Reaktor’s 70+ included instruments and make your own from scratch. David is Native Instrument’s product specialist and he knows the software inside and out. He’ll teach: 

Reaktor Basics: 

  • Working with Ensembles, Instruments, Macros and Modules 
  • Oscillators, filters and amplifiers 
  • Parameters like pitch, wave type, filters, resonance and cutoff 
  • Linear and event messages 
Additive Synthesis: 

  • Creating a partial with math modules 
  • Working with amplifiers and modulators 
FM Synthesis: 

  • What IS FM synthesis and how does it work? 
  • Changing partials into operators for FM synthesis 
  • Creating an approximation of the FM 8 using a mod matrix 
Sampling: 

  • Different types of samplers: FM, Loop, Grain 
  • Creating sample maps 
  • Creating hybrid synths 
Reaktor doesn’t have to be overwhelming, David will help you overcome the fear of Reaktor’s complexity and unlock its potential.  

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

This is a GREAT class. I highly recommend it. Reaktor can be intimidating, but little by little he breaks it down. I feel like I have gotten practical use out of it from watching these videos. There is so much to learn here. I have come back multiple times to watch. David Earl is a superior instructor. You will enjoy him. I hope he will do more here.

a Creativelive Student
 

David Earl (he doesn't care what you call him) is the best! I watched so many tutorials on Reaktor and by his second video I already learned more than the other ones. Thank you!