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Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 7 of 26

Detuning Oscillators

 

Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 7 of 26

Detuning Oscillators

 

Lesson Info

Detuning Oscillators

The final thing I want to do is I want to give myself the ability to detain the oscillators which I talked about so long ago and started packing macros just to make everything look neat, right, because now it's a lot easier for me to go into the oscillators and go like, Oh, cool. I can go in here and here's my note pitch. But what I'm gonna do is create an ad module and I'm gonna pull this off to the side because this ad module, I'm going to do three ports on it going to create two controls that these controls are completely arbitrary or whatever I want them to be. Now we're talking about tuning. Tuning comes in two forms, we've got semi tones and then we also have sense. So when we move something incense, it's from semi tone, a semi tone. So like from sea to sea sharp, that'd be 100 cents if we go semi tone a semi tone, that's course tuning, which would be just 1234 You no one is going to be a semi tone to is going to be a major second. You know that kind of stuff. So my first knob is...

going to be course tuning. So if I'm going to go on octave up and knocked it down, I want a knob that goes, you know, either way and semi tones and octopus and knocked it down Octave, I want four active, so I'm gonna say and negative. and step size. I have to think very carefully about the step. Size step. Size is going to be one semi tone is one in Logar. That pitch semi tone is one because there's 12 semi tones Interactive. Right. So now we got 48 up in 48 down four Oscars, four octaves. Right, So four octaves up and down and you've let to move by one semi tone each time you write each time you click it. Yeah, Click that click the knob. Exactly. Cool. So then, instead of add, this is gonna be called course, And this one we're going to call. Fine. Now, fine is only gonna go up one and down, negative one. So starting from our note, we can go up a semi tone or down a semi tone, but we need 100 cents between each one and if one is defining it, then we need to make sure that our step size this 0.2 because we need 200 between one and negative one, right? Because it would be 100 to go up 100 to go down one. And we just so happen to have gotten lucky in our step sizes pointed to. So it's gonna be correct. No, I've done that. I want that for each oscillator. So I need to do is copy Paste copy Paste. I'll pull all this stuff over to the right a little bit so the note pitch comes in, and then the values of the knobs that we created are going to be added or subtracted from that value. Now, here's another trick you can do in Reactor. I can go to my panel to you because this is all a mess, right? But then split the view so that on the bottom I have a structure of you and on top of the panel view, and what's good about this is I can get inside that oscillator. She's the first course tuning, and that'll make sure that in choosing the right one for the right oscillator, right? This one has pitched with era pulsed with in addition. So this course to here's fine tuning to this one I see is course tuning for three. This one's fine tuning for three and I gotta move this pulse with down Now, here's something really be careful of our course tunings were automatically set 48. So therefore, actives up. So you don't want to play your instrument until you've looked at your settings because they will be cutting your head off if you aren't careful and you know, my instruments getting kind of, well, kind of big and chunky. Um, here's what I'm gonna dio thes course tuning knobs don't have to be so big, so I go into their properties and under view on too small. It's another nice and small. There's a way that we can start getting a real estate back when we start talking about additive synthesis. It's gonna be very important for us to be careful about our real estate so I could do the same thing with my filter, and you can change the size of this window to there's your within your height. Yeah, here's a cool thing with switch. So it's foot switch right now is a button for each parameter, right? But down here, you see what's his buttons? If we change it to menu, we get a menu. So if I turn this off, I can choose from a menu. Or one thing I like to do is spin. So you hit the little plus it takes you through each of the filter types, right? Maybe I'll do that and I'll make it nice and small changing the width. Maybe I'll take that switch and put it underneath. This is how we're customizing our environment. Some people, instead of seeing knobs, they like to see sliders for a tactic. A sustained release so we can choose vertical fader. Now the vertical failures are too big, right? But what we can dio let's make them small and make the fader length very short. So change the fader length toe like so I can enter those values 40. Okay, 40 Attack 40. And if I was being If I wanted to be really quick about the whole thing, um I would probably just copy these. Heck, why Don't just do it, because I did all this work making these look right. And now I got to go down and I got to do it again on all these knobs, right? Well, since these values are all the same the attack, decay and sustained release with this down a little bit, I'm gonna go into my structure getting my envelopes, and okay, I have that selected. So check it out, delete those in a copy and paste these failures, and I'll just attach him because we know the value is gonna be right. Just an envelope, right? Attack, decay, Sustain, release. Put down. There we go. There are lots of ways you want to try and de shortcuts, if at all possible in reactor. And I might even and I'm looking at my real estate a little bit. I might want to just take the envelopes and put them side by side instead of vertical. I just like the way it looks more visually. That's the other nice thing about building, since in reactors, you can have control of the aesthetic, you know? So the LFO section to get my envelope section there's my filter on, I think. Let's see, Don't do that. Take me on boats from over there. There we go. More of kind of a vertical look to it, but there we go, making it nice and compact.

Class Description

Let’s be real: Native Instruments’ Reaktor can be intimidating at first glance. But behind the complexity is an incredibly powerful modular synthesis environment that can create anything from synthesizers, grooveboxes, and sequencers to sample transformers, sound generators, and effects.

In Reaktor Modular Synthesis with David Earl, you’ll learn how to tweak Reaktor’s 70+ included instruments and make your own from scratch. David is Native Instrument’s product specialist and he knows the software inside and out. He’ll teach: 

Reaktor Basics: 

  • Working with Ensembles, Instruments, Macros and Modules 
  • Oscillators, filters and amplifiers 
  • Parameters like pitch, wave type, filters, resonance and cutoff 
  • Linear and event messages 
Additive Synthesis: 

  • Creating a partial with math modules 
  • Working with amplifiers and modulators 
FM Synthesis: 

  • What IS FM synthesis and how does it work? 
  • Changing partials into operators for FM synthesis 
  • Creating an approximation of the FM 8 using a mod matrix 
Sampling: 

  • Different types of samplers: FM, Loop, Grain 
  • Creating sample maps 
  • Creating hybrid synths 
Reaktor doesn’t have to be overwhelming, David will help you overcome the fear of Reaktor’s complexity and unlock its potential.  

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

This is a GREAT class. I highly recommend it. Reaktor can be intimidating, but little by little he breaks it down. I feel like I have gotten practical use out of it from watching these videos. There is so much to learn here. I have come back multiple times to watch. David Earl is a superior instructor. You will enjoy him. I hope he will do more here.

a Creativelive Student
 

David Earl (he doesn't care what you call him) is the best! I watched so many tutorials on Reaktor and by his second video I already learned more than the other ones. Thank you!