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Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 22 of 26

Sampler Loop

 

Modular Synthesis with Reaktor

Lesson 22 of 26

Sampler Loop

 

Lesson Info

Sampler Loop

Okay, so I'm gonna go back into the structure here, So sampler fn. That's pretty cool. It's the next level of I'll get rid of this and I'm gonna leave all the other stuff that I had, though. And that's one of the fun things about playing with samplers is that as you go up in the sampler, you can use all the stuff that you were you had before, So this multiply here. I'm just gonna type length for L E n Just I remember that I'm connecting toe length with this thing. So I'm gonna control Click, Let's get a built in module and let's explore sample loop. So Sam pollute. Now you'll notice that as we go up in samplers, the inputs on the left hand side become more numerous. That's okay. I'll explain it all. All right, so we have our audio in here just like we did before. We have a gate, there's our gate value. So now check it out. There's no trigger. Right? So the gate is acting as the trigger. That's one piece of nomenclature that changes as we get into the, uh, the sensible further up going ...

to use my note pitch input. I'm gonna move all this. Well, yeah, I guess I'll just use the FM two. What the heck? It's right there. Now. I also have something called Sample Select. So it's great. Is that this instead of we can throw a bunch of samples into a list here, but we're able to move through them using a knob. So I'm just gonna use control and I'll figure out what I need to set the control to A soon as I get my samples in here. Now, I'm not gonna use a sample map that I had before. I want to use something that's a little bit more. He's like, base or something like that. So I'll open up my desktop and a good loops, and I've got some bases here. Actually. You know what? It's gonna take all this stuff and I'll drag it into the list. Okay. Now, when I drag it into the list, it starts zero. Then it goes up to the highest value, which in this case is 10. So zero through 10. I got to keep that in mind because of my sample. Select here. I want that to g 00 to 10 as well with a step size of one. So that way I can select each of the samples. It's in that list on the left hand side. If I pull this keyboard all the way to have left, you'll see them hanging out down there. Now, in order for things toe loop, there are a couple of things we have to dio, uh, I'm gonna select each one of these. I need to go into the wave form view, and I need to tell it. Toe, loop, loop. Now we can also reverse the loop. If we wanted Teoh, I'd probably copied before I did that. Okay. With the sample select Control on See, they're spread across the entire keyboard. Now, the only problem is I'm using it to K and release envelope. Unfortunately, that can and release envelope doesn't have a sustain. So if I hold it down, it just dies off. So I am gonna have to change this envelope. I'm gonna use macro building block envelope. Idiots are Isn't that easy? Not cool that you wish we had done that the whole time. We've been going through this course. No, You wanted to learn right there. we go, so check it out. Not only does it give us an envelope, it's all cool and like in its own macro and meet clean once you have more and more Mac Rose stuff looks really good. Okay, Now pitch in FMR over here because that has to do with the FM that we're setting up before Turn off this little wrench. Now I got from a FM down because that's what it actually sounds like. I remember laying down a little bit. So it's the same sample that's being played across the entire keyboard. Now I can select my sample by coming up here, and she is a different sample and hit a key when I hit the key. That's when it triggers for the next sample to start. See, Hold it down at loops. Now, let's get back in there because we have a couple of things with looping now where this length output is gonna be really good. So we have our start point loops start loop length. That's what S T l s and l l means so. What I'd like to do is have my sample start and my loop start be the same because I want my loop start to be where my sample start is. Otherwise you could start at the beginning of the sample. And then it goes to a point where it supposed to loop and it'll loop there, which you can dio. But in this in this for what I want to dio I want to do it a little differently. Actually, no, I will do that just to show you how it works. So I'll take my length output going to the beginning of this multiplier. Change this from calling at length. This will be S t for sample start Cool. So now I have a sample start. I'm going to copy this and paste and this will become my lips start. So call this ls paced again. This will be loop length getting messy as it is want to do. I will try and move around this sorry toe, my French listeners. It was a terrible friend chefs and all right. It's the length, actually that's attached. Stepped it up to do. There's a simple start. There's a loop start and one of these is supposed to be loop length. That would be this one. I shall call it L L. I'm not saying for a loop Link 2.5. So that's 0. 0.75 says 3/4 of the way through. And then all the way open, I'll change my loop start so that it starts 0.25 in lawn chairs by weep length so that it's actually 0. So, as you see, it's going from the beginning and then going to a spot. So here's the thing and gets more fun. The higher the resolution of your loop length ISS and your lips start, so I'll go to my loop length and a set of 0. maybe else a point 25. I'm moving. My lips start around. Well, I have the loop length really small, and that's when you get a really fun, really fun sound design. So my loop length will change that 2.0 to 5. So it's even smaller. Uh uh. Now, if we have our right now, we have a separate start, right? So it starts, it goes, and then it loops. But what we are going to do next is we're going to change eso that our sample, start and loop start are the same. So I just take my sample start and I attach it to the loop start. No, just take my sorry little loop start and delete it. So with my sample starting loop, start the same Now it's getting revenge on me. Uh oh. You just have to be somewhere where there's audio, so that's pretty fun. So you take that and you give it the same resolution like 0.0. T. Five. Now, wouldn't it be cool if, instead of me mousing around, try and get him moving? If I had actual nods that I could work with Well, the next thing I want to show us how to assign knobs from an external controller to the controls and reactor and it's ridiculously simple. So I'm going to use my top two knobs on my acai here. I will control Click on L L. My loop length and same body and OSC learned and turn that do the same thing over here. Midian. OSC learned he's in control. Click. So now. So that's really fun sound design stuff, and I'm just barely touching the surface. But, um, I'm doing this on a drum loop right now. But if we choose select. So, yeah, it is a lot of really fun possibilities with that. And using that length output amusing that multiplier and having it between zero and one is really cool, because there are other things that go 0 to 1 as well. And later on on. Yeah, I'm not gonna give you too much foreshadowing, because it's just too cool. So I'm going to save the sample map because I'm obviously gonna use it again. Um, expert, including audio references. Lubie stuff fee. Yeah. Loopy. Stuffy. That's the name of my sample men.

Class Description

Let’s be real: Native Instruments’ Reaktor can be intimidating at first glance. But behind the complexity is an incredibly powerful modular synthesis environment that can create anything from synthesizers, grooveboxes, and sequencers to sample transformers, sound generators, and effects.

In Reaktor Modular Synthesis with David Earl, you’ll learn how to tweak Reaktor’s 70+ included instruments and make your own from scratch. David is Native Instrument’s product specialist and he knows the software inside and out. He’ll teach: 

Reaktor Basics: 

  • Working with Ensembles, Instruments, Macros and Modules 
  • Oscillators, filters and amplifiers 
  • Parameters like pitch, wave type, filters, resonance and cutoff 
  • Linear and event messages 
Additive Synthesis: 

  • Creating a partial with math modules 
  • Working with amplifiers and modulators 
FM Synthesis: 

  • What IS FM synthesis and how does it work? 
  • Changing partials into operators for FM synthesis 
  • Creating an approximation of the FM 8 using a mod matrix 
Sampling: 

  • Different types of samplers: FM, Loop, Grain 
  • Creating sample maps 
  • Creating hybrid synths 
Reaktor doesn’t have to be overwhelming, David will help you overcome the fear of Reaktor’s complexity and unlock its potential.  

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

This is a GREAT class. I highly recommend it. Reaktor can be intimidating, but little by little he breaks it down. I feel like I have gotten practical use out of it from watching these videos. There is so much to learn here. I have come back multiple times to watch. David Earl is a superior instructor. You will enjoy him. I hope he will do more here.

a Creativelive Student
 

David Earl (he doesn't care what you call him) is the best! I watched so many tutorials on Reaktor and by his second video I already learned more than the other ones. Thank you!