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Manipulating Your Environment

Lesson 10 from: Photography Essentials: Getting Your Best Shots

Sean Dalton

Manipulating Your Environment

Lesson 10 from: Photography Essentials: Getting Your Best Shots

Sean Dalton

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Lesson Info

10. Manipulating Your Environment

Lesson Info

Manipulating Your Environment

So this is a topic that I really haven't seen discussed in many beginner photography courses, maybe, except for food styling courses. And what I'm talking about is manipulating your environment to get a better composition or a better image in general, and what I mean by this is basically physically changing your environment around you um to get a photo that looks better for your camera. So if you're shooting a model, then that would be positioning your model to look better in the image, maybe you're, you know, posing them differently. You're having them stand up, you're having them sit down. I think that's the easiest example to understand. Um and then if you're shooting food, then that means you might be moving things around on the table, you know, taking out a glass if it's distracting or, you know, adding silverware to kind of balance the composition or something like that. Sometimes adjusting your physical environment isn't possible. So with things like street photography where you...

really wanna be hands off, you just kind of want to let things develop naturally and then you're not gonna be able to physically adjust your environment, but you can in other settings. And I think this is one of the things that a lot of beginning photographers, um they don't do, they kind of see a scene and then they think that it's just up to them to shoot that scene, but in reality, you know, you're the photographer, you're the artist, you can adjust that scene um to make it look however you want it to look. So if you're going to a restaurant and they set a plate down in front of you, you want to take that photo, um you're not confined to take that photo in that place, move it to the other side of the table, ask if you can shoot it in a different part of the restaurant. You know, you have full creative control as a photographer, so don't be afraid to, you know, take control and you know, adjust your physical environment, adjust things with your hands, move things around um and try to come up with a better composition that way, you know, everything that is in your frame is working together to tell some type of story. And I really want you to think about all of the different things in your frame and that's why I made this video. Is is not to kind of teach you a concrete lesson, but rather to get you thinking about how all of the things in your frame or telling some type of story and how you can change things in that frame to better tell that story or maybe tell a slightly different story. So think about that next time you're shooting something. So whether you're shooting a person or some food or even a landscape, you know, putting something in the foreground of your landscape can tell a completely different story. For example, if you put a piece of trash, um an empty water bottle in your foreground of your composition, well that could be commentary on environmental change. Whereas if there's no bottle, it's just a beautiful image of a landscape. So physically adjusting the environment of your photo can really have a profound impact. So I just want you to think about that going forward.

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