Adobe® Photoshop® 101

 

Adobe® Photoshop® 101

 

Lesson Info

Saving for the Web

So far when we've saved our files we've gone to the file menu and just chosen save as and the reason why we've chosen say vows is save as usually means save this as a file name different than it was a moment ago and when we opened something originally it came from let's say a template file that comes with this course or came from a raw file or something else where I didn't necessarily want to save back into the original so save as alive in a type in a new file name and save it out choose the the file format once I've done that once. So if I choose save as right now and just call this frame fished talk about that in a moment afterwards once I already have the file format specified in the name specified from then on I'm just using save and save will be great out if you haven't made any changes to the image so a lot of people are used to that save as would mean I want to save it under a different name or a different file format than what is currently in but then we have a choice called sa...

fe for web and when do we use that? Will you think for the web right? But if you want to say for the web, we need to think about a little bit because your camera captures big pictures pictures that are usually way too large for the internet, he and so I want to talk a little bit about how we think about what size are picture will look like when it gets on the internet and how I deal with that. If you want to see how big any photo would appear on a website, if you were to just save it, handed to somebody and have uploaded it without anything limiting its size, which you want to do is double click on the zoom toole, the one that looks like a magnifying glass. If you double click on the zoom tool that's how big your image will look on the internet so this picture is gonna be huge if I don't want it to be this big on the internet, if I wanted to be something else, what I want to do is zoom and resume out of my picture until it looks the size. I want it to look on the internet. Well, just imagine I'm looking at a web browser right now. How big do you want your picture to be? Well, I don't want it to be where I have to scroll around it, to see everything I wanted, at least we'll see the whole thing, and that would be pretty darn big, I want my picture to be about that big so just zoom in her out until the picture is about the size you want to look on the internet just imagine your viewing in a web browser right now now here is how to get it to actually end up being that big when viewed on the internet in the lower left corner there will be a percentage that same percentage will be shown at the top of your image in the tab or the file name is it's the same number that's how much you've zoomed in our zoomed out on your picture which you want to do then is go to the image menu and choose image size in an image size you just need to make sure one check boxes turned on it usually is but I just need a double check and that's this one called re sample re sample means allow me to change how much info is in this file? If it's turned off it can't change the amount of info. Usually these little pop up menus will either be set to pixels or inches depending on what you used last well you want to do is set them two percent and after you set them two percent you want to look at the percentage it's down there in the corner your picture that's the percentage you want type in so I just typed in twelve point five click okay your pictures gonna look tiny but you're typing in whatever number showed up in that bottom right her bottom left corner uh now to double check that everything worked double click on the zoom tool because that gets you to one hundred percent view which is always the view of the image that you get on the internet so double click on the zoom tool and it will be exactly the size you saw earlier so do that before you use the choice called safer web huh so what was it you zoom in zoom out until it's the size you want it to be on the internet look at the percentage that's in the corner you go to the image menu choose image size set the little pop up menu two percent so it's not measured in inches or pixels in type in that percentage and then click okay and it's going to scale it down such that it would appear that size on the internet if you want to test it double click on the zoom tool that'll show you one hundred percent view which is internet view you'll have it then you can go to the file menu and you say for web when you choose safer webb on the right side upper right you can choose a file format and these are the general ones we have we're saving for web if you have a straight photograph then j peg will give you the highest quality and smallest file size if, on the other hand, you have a graphic meaning a logo, a signature, a bar chart something it isn't a photographic detail instead, something that has large areas of solid color then stay away from j peg at all costs because it's for photos jpeg, will make your graphics, your logo's in your tax look like it's been had popcorn sprayed on it or something. It'll have this chunky junk around it that looks terrible. You'll see it on almost every photographer's website because photographers think j pegs the best shape makes best for photos, not for graphics. Instead. For graphics, you can use gif or ping I would usually use ping it's a more modern file format thing give uh, but you also use ping for photos if you need a transparent background. So in this case we have white out on the edge, but if I hide the bottom layer so I see a checkerboard and I want it to still be empty there when it gets on the internet so whatever's on the web page fills in the checkerboard instead. Then when you're in here, even though you have a photo and it's not the most ideal file format for photos, you want to choose ping, and if I choose a ping twenty four there's going to be this check box called transparency the choice called gif also has transparency but that transparency only has one level of transparency which means something is either completely gone or completely showing up there is no in between which means if there is a drop shadow or something else that softly fades out you can't do that it's going to clip it like a pair of scissors whereas with ping it has two hundred fifty six levels up to that of transparency which means you can have a soft shadow and still maintain it with that if you choose ping eight you still can get transparency you'll get a smaller file size as well in there you got a lot of different studies in here most of the stuff you can ignore but the setting the controls with ping your file size and your quality is the number of colors so vary that number try to go for the lowest number that gives you the acceptable quality so we have j peg only for photos photos that don't need transparency and we have gift for ping for graphics and or for photographs that have transparency you need to be able to have that drop shadow or something and have it play over on something else and when it comes to either pink or gift that thing that controls both file size and quality is the number of colors so try to go for the lowest number of colors that gives you acceptable quality so that is saving for web? Yes so what if your website says you need a specific pixel range or maximum pixel range? Okay, same work, maximum width and height kind of thing. Yes, well, that's fun that instead of doing what I I did, the first thing I would do is if you have any transparency around the edge of your picture, do this trim uh do you remember when we had the choice called reveal all where if I move something so it extended beyond the edge of my document I chose reveal all because it made my document larger big enough to show me the stuff that went beyond the edge right? Somewhat of the opposite of that would be trim, trim means make my documents smaller and just get rid of empty space. So when I choose trim it asked what do I want to trim away? And in this case I have transparent pixels and that means the checkerboard get rid of anything that's pure checkerboard until you hit something that is different than checkerboard because that's not needed space it's transparent when you open a web browser it doesn't show up it's full of empty, so when I choose ok it just sucked in the edges of the file until it hit the first thing that's not transparent because emptiness contains nothing so if they're requesting something that is you know, five hundred pixels wide, and you gotta find with a bunch of transparency around it's, a logo and then emptiness. Why scale the emptiness down to five hundred pixels wide? Why not scaled what's in that emptiness to that, that makes sense. So first, to trim, if you happen to have empty space around it. Secondly, go to the image menu, choose image size, and you're gonna have this set to pixels and just type in what they said they needed for the maximum, and it would scale it to that particular size.

Class Description


Adobe® Photoshop® lets you bring out the best in your photographs – learn how to navigate the powerful software in Adobe® Photoshop® 101 with Ben Willmore.

Ben will show you how to use the most important features of Adobe® Photoshop® by working through common, real-world projects and explaining the process. You’ll get to know the Adobe® Photoshop® interface and learn about the features you’ll use the most. Ben will teach you how to:

  • Enhance hair, eyes, and lips in portraits
  • Merge multiple images into a panorama
  • Fix bright reflections on glasses and closed eyes in a group shot
  • Correct photos that are under or overexposed
  • Create a collage of multiple images

You’ll learn how layers, selections, masks, and filters help you make a great image and find out why resolution, file formats, and color profiles matter. Ben will break down commonly-heard technical jargon so you know what others are saying and you’ll learn keyboard commands that will make your work easier.

By the end this class you’ll be confident and comfortable working in Adobe® Photoshop® and know how to troubleshoot when problems arise. 

This course is part of the Photoshop Tutorials series


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2014.2.2