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Adobe Photoshop Mastery: Color & Tone

Lesson 8 of 9

2:30 pm - Advanced Color Adjustments

Ben Willmore

Adobe Photoshop Mastery: Color & Tone

Ben Willmore

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Lesson Info

8. 2:30 pm - Advanced Color Adjustments

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  Class Trailer
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1 9:00 am - Tonal Adjustments Duration:1:27:55
2 11:00 am - Understanding Curves Duration:1:07:12
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3 1:00 pm - Color Adjustments Duration:1:09:52
5 Bonus Content Duration:47:05

Lesson Info

2:30 pm - Advanced Color Adjustments

we still have a few adjustments that we haven't talked about yet because we're gonna In the end, when we look at the adjustment menu, I believe Will will have gone through all of them by the end of the day. Just know that I personally concentrate on two adjustments curves in hue and saturation. And a lot of the other adjustments are just simpler versions of what those two tools conduce you without giving you all the power. So I would ultimately, if I was a user of Photoshopped that wasn't comfortable with those two tools. Would that would be. My aspiration is to eventually get comfortable with those two, because then I can replace many of the others, simplify the number of adjustments I use. So let's take a look at what else we can do. First, I'm going to see if I can get Photoshopped to not cooperate. Now, I don't know if I'll be able to do that or not. Could Sometimes, Usually, photo shop won't cooperate where I'll do something have done in the past. In the larger the audience watchi...

ng, the greater the likelihood of that. It just won't work, even though it's worked before in the past. Um, I'm gonna try to do the opposite. Enforce it, Teoh to not cooperate. And if you look at this radio, what I'd like to do is, let's say a client has asked me to make it look as if this radio was made out of one type of wood instead of having the two tone look. So the bottom part of the wood I want to make look like the top part. So this area down here now, I could do that in one of two ways I could either use, um, curves. Or I could use hue and saturation and have to choose between the two. Usually if the colors air, really similar curves could be used. If the colors are quite different and you're looking for a blatant manipulation, then hue and saturation, you gotta pick one. If you're not, shoot Sure. Which one? Flip ical. You gotta pick one. Okay, I'm gonna use human saturation in this case because I think it might Bill to get it to mess up s o. What did we do before? Let's see, we took the color sampler tool didn't way. We clicked on the color we wanted to match. So I'm gonna click within this area, and I'm just going to avoid the wood grain and get the base color of the wood like right here. Click. And then I'll come down here and click again in this area, just trying to avoid all the little dark scratches and other things to get an average area of color. Click. Got to read us then, As you remember in the info panel, we have a readouts. The kind of adjustment we're gonna use is ah, hs al, it's called. So I need these to be his close in type of read out. So I click and the closest I confined as they just be right. Done that before, set them both to that. And then I'm going to do a hue and saturation adjustment layer. You know, try to isolate just that color. So remember the hand tool. You can come down to your image and click on something to attempt to isolate it. Click and hopefully that will be good enough to isolate it. If it's not, I might look in here and say, Well, D c. The yellows, which might be mawr, the color of what's up above? I might want to just snug that over so it doesn't fade out into the yellows. Does that make sense? So now let's see if I can make this change happen. I'm just gonna look at the numbers that are in my info panel, and I'm simply gonna try to get a readout number. What is it? Um, To to match, Read out number one. Want number two to match number one. All right. So I see my hue. I'm number two. Currently at 23. I need 40. So that means I take the hue and I boost it right Goes up. I'm just looking in the info panel. See if I can get it up to 40. There we go. Now. The basic color should be the same in the two. Next, I usually adjust brightness. Eso. Let's see if it'll allow me to do that. And I just don't seem to be able to get it high. Can't go up high if that ever happens. Adjust the other slider and get it near where you want to go. Come on. 40. So I got 40 and 40 is not what I have over here, But then I need my brightness to be can, uh, I can't get it that high. For some reason, there's a disconnect that is not allowing me to do that. Now there's a couple different reasons that could be happening. It could be that the area where I added my little color sampler is simply not being adjusted all the way. Maybe that area where the little color sampler is is actually in that little fade out zone. Where is partially being affected? That could be it, or it could be a whole bunch of other things. But when I look at the image, it's not looking the way I want it. So what can I do about it? Well, first off, I could expand the range and working on and decide that instead of trying to isolate those colors using these sliders that I might decide to work on the whole image for at least a wide range of it to try to get it. So they're not relying on that to isolate things. Now let's see if I happen to be able to get the numbers change, because I could always paint on the mask toe isolate something instead. So now my numbers airway off again. So let's try getting them all together. This is my target, which is 40 40 70. So over here, I need this to be 40 to see if I get it. There's 40 on and then I'm gonna work on my brightness. Next. I need it to be 70. Still, I can't get it up there. Just not going where I want it, Teoh. So let's try to get the other number. We have 15 and I need 40. So it's boost that up. Okay, we got 40. It looks to me like my hue shifted just a tiny amount. But if it's only off by one, that's close enough. So we're close to 40 40 now that is supposed to be at 70. Let's see if we can get it there. It's what the heck. It's going down as I go up. It's just not give me what I want. See how sometimes it just doesn't do what you want? All right, so what I could do is ignore the numbers and just visibly look and see what's happening when I move this stuff around, and if it's useful. I could grab my brush tool right now And I could paint with black over the areas that I don't want to have change. There's a trick when you're painting If you want to paint a straight line hold on the shift key and click It connects the dots between where you clicked last and where you clicking now So right now I'm holding down shift so I could get a bunch of straight lines as I paint. I'm just gonna get so the top of this thing is not changing it all. Imagine I painted over all this stuff. I can fix that later. But main thing is, I'm trying to get this toe. Isolate just the area. Want to be honest? I don't know what I'm gonna do next. I'm just trying the stuff we talked about, but let's see. So now I've isolated that. So let's see, if I turn off my eyeball, you can see the bottom part of the image changing. When I look at it, I think the bottom part of the image might not look colorful enough so I might push it up. So now I'm ignoring the numbers and I'm saying they have failed me. So I'm gonna go with my instinct, which is my vision to try to get these things to match. I'll move the hue, see if it needs to be a little warmer, cooler. Anything else to match and try my lightness. If my lightness can't quite do it, I might decide to instead apply curves because the curves I can adjust the brightness, brighten or darken as much as I want. But I want to share with you things we haven't done yet. So what else can I dio? Well, try this out. I can create a brand new empty layer and with that empty, later active, I could grab my paintbrush. I could move it on top of my image and I think we did this once before, but I don't know if you remember. There's a way to grab a color out of your image to paint with an All it is is when you're in the paint brush tool, you can hold down the option key Ultima windows and you get an eyedropper temporarily. But that just means click on whatever you want to paint with. So I'm gonna grab the color of the wood Here, I'll come down and I'm just gonna paint across this area. Just get some paint in there over the area that I'm trying to change. Imagine I'm just a little bit more precise than this. Have you ever seen the straight lines and holding shift now would usually be a little more careful. You're welcome to grab the eraser tool and with the eraser tool active, clean it up a little. I ended up down here. Okay, Now I want Photoshopped to use the color that I've painted onto that layer to affect what's underneath. So to accomplish that, I go to the top of my layers panel. That's where I find a pop up menu that's usually set to normal. And the choice that I want to use is one of two. And those choices are Hugh and color. Hugh Means apply the basic color of whatever is on this later, what's underneath? But keep what's underneath just as colorful as it used to be. Keep what's underneath just as bright as it used to be. Onley change the basic color. So here goes you. Now I'll hide that layer to share what it looked like without it before. After I see that I have a little less of a yellowish in the middle of the bottom of the radio, a little more of, ah, golden tone in there. But the problem with the choice called Hugh, is it's not able to change how colorful areas are. And so if there wasn't enough color in certain areas, just still not gonna be enough color because it can't change something. Notice saturation. If I change this menu, though, toe a choice cold color now it can change both the Hugh, which means the basic color and the saturation. So if I said it to color now, it's really forcing that color into that area a lot more aggressively. And if it's too aggressive, all I would do is lower the opacity of a layer, so I might click on the word opacity, bring it all the way down and slowly bring it up. Decide how much of that do I need. Try to get it in there, and I would have to be more careful with my masking, so I didn't get some bleed over. I can see some areas that got lightened above, but if you look at that before and after. Maybe I go back to the original. Is it looking a little bit more like it? You can. Then on top of that fine tune, it was something like hue and saturation to say, Well, it doesn't look perfect. So I'll come in here, click on this area and drag left and right to change the saturation. And you could paint on the master control where that happens to get it to be more fine tune. But the main thing I wanted to get across there was we have some alternatives. The main alternative is that we could paint on a layer and use huer color mode to force colors in there to force the way it looks. And then you could also do a curves adjustment layer to affect the brightness. To say I'm getting out of human saturation because it didn't serve me. I'm gonna use curve to get the brightness near it. I'm gonna use that layer with paint on it to get the color near it to see how you can tackle it. I'm not saying it looks perfect right now. I'm being kind of crude about it, But if I was more careful with the colors I choose to paint with and how I'm ask it. I could probably get that. So look pretty close. Yeah. If you have chosen curves initially instead of hue and saturation, do you think that would have done a better job? It may have. It's hard to say in. So what I might do is if I try something like Hue and Saturation doesn't do the job for me. Then I just switch over and try the other. We can try it quick, Look over here and do, uh, I'll take our two samplers and in curves we have sliders for red, green and blue. So that's the kind of readout I need for both of these. Remember that. What is that? Number two is what we're changing. We're changing it into number one. So I gotta curves, hold down the two special keys and click so it measures it and then coming here to read. And I'm just gonna type in the numbers from number green, uh 1 and blue one of six. It's hard to say because it applied to the entire image, So the to still look different. So afterwards I would end up working in my mask, had invert the mask with command I and grab my paintbrush paint with white and you see Hey, how about that? It looks like it was much more reliable using curbs. And so if I found that to be good enough, I would be more careful with my masking. Do that. Is that looking like it's a little bit closer? You can then on top of that, to hue and saturation if you wanted to affect the same area and your layers just make this show up where this only affects where this information is, and you do that in your adjustment with that little down pointing arrow that's actually going to say if there's a mask in the layer below, use that mask for this, too, and so I could come in and you just that's a little too saturated. Bring it down a little. Maybe it needs to be brightened a little, but you could find Tune it. Let's try something we haven't done. I would like to reproduce this, um, image using only two colors of ink. I'm gonna do a brochure. Let's say. And I know I'm going to have this printed on a printing press because I'm gonna print 10,000 copies. I need black ink for my text, some stuck using that I want this photograph in. So I either gotta pick red ink for my second color or blue ink, depending on what's most important to me. The car is more important than the sky. So I'm gonna sprint this using black ink and Reddick, right? I'm going to pick the most popular red ink we used when I worked back when I worked at a newspaper, Pantone 1 And I thought it was funny. I used to work for a daily newspaper this back in college days. In all the advertising reps would walk up to me with ads, printed another magazines and pointed at me and say, What color is that? And I just rattle off the color. It's like panto 25 Pantone 1 99 There was only about five colors that most people used. If it was blue, just say the word reflex blue. If it was red, it was normal, Say 1 If it was darker, say, 1 99 I mean, they thought I was like, a genius. I'd like five colors stuck in my head. That was it. So they always come up to me. What's this like? You could remember this, too, if you want, so just remember that. So let's take a look at what this image is made out of, and let's see if we can make it out of two colors of ink. First off, if I go to the image menu and choose mode, you'll see that the current motives RGB RGB is talking about light. If you're gonna print on a printing press, you need to be in the other mode. That talks about Inc. Which has seemed like a Now when I think about seeing my K, I think Onley about a printing press, not a desktop printer, not a company. I'm going to send it out to and get 10 copies of a brochure. But I mean, when I'm ordering 2000 copies or 10,000 copies and it's on a commercial printing press, the huge machine that costs multi $1,000,000 you have to call it for printing companies to do that. We're in the name of the company. It's so in so printing company or press, you know and otherwise all other uses for my image. RGB mode is fine Desktop color printer RGB mode. The printer driver itself, with software running the printer will do the conversion when it's a desktop printer. So see, my came out very specific to printing presses. So anyway, I'm gonna convert to see why came out. Just so my image is thought of as being made with ink, because that's what we're trying to talk about Now, if I look in the channels panel and if you don't have the channels panel visible on your screen, you go to the window menu to find it. But in the channels panel, it will show me what the image is thought of as being made out of. So here is how much Science Inc magenta ink, yellowing of black ink, is used to reproduce the some internal printing press. We're gonna use this material to somehow make it all out of two colors of ink, so let's take a look at these and inspect them. I just click on the science. There's how much Science Inc you would use not much in a red car. A lot of science in the sky, though, because we got a bluish sky. Right? Here's how much magenta ink you'd use. Lots of magenta ink to make a red car, right? Not much in a blue sky, Not much in the wood below. Here is the yellow. The main thing I noticed the difference between magenta and yellow is looking my sky magenta, yellow so there's not much in the sky on yellow, and then we have black. So we got to somehow figure out how to get this down to only two colors and then make it so the second color is the red that I'd like to use in my brain. I'm just gonna be thinking about what's in these particular channels in The things I'm gonna be thinking about is if we remove three colors of ink Cyan, magenta and yellow in each one of those colors of ink were used down here where the wood is. There was some scientific. There was some magenta ink. There was some yellow ink. Then there's probably not gonna be enough black if we use it, as is right now, we're gonna have to push some of that in the black to darken it up to compensate for a moving it out of the others. Does that make any sense? We're taking it out. All the other colors. We're gonna put a little bit back in the black to compensate. Then I'm gonna look through these channels and say, Which one do you think is best to get a red car without getting red in the sky? Well, this wouldn't be very much ink for a red car right there. That would be a lot of pink and red carpet. Look great. Lots of red there. But look how much would be in the sky. Yellow. Ah, there. We have a lot in this car. So imagine that was red ink that get really red car in. Look, there's next to nothing in the sky. So I think I'm gonna use the yellow to determine how much red ink I would use. Meaning? Used that much right there, whatever it showing. And then I'm gonna push some of the other colors into the black to compensate for removing things. How the heck can I do that? Well, I'm gonna use an adjustment that I don't think we talked about yet? Image adjustments, Channel mixer. Here's what it looks like. First, we need to tell it which of these channels we want to work on. Well, I'm gonna start with science, and it just tells me in here we're working on the Science Channel. In usually the Science Channel contains 100% of what used to be in the science Channel. That would be no adjustment whatsoever, But I don't want to use any scientific whatsoever, So I'm gonna set Scion to zero. Now, if you look in my channels panel, did you notice that science just got cleared out? No ink in there whatsoever. I'm gonna also come in here and say I don't want to use any yellowing because I want to pay for yellowing. Usually the yellow would use 100% of what was originally in the yellow. I'm gonna set it to zero now. If you look, we've cleared out two of the channels I am. Then I'm gonna tell it what to do with Magenta. Magenta is going to represent the reading that I'm gonna use. But do you remember with that and had an awful lot in the sky. You can see it right now in the picture. Lots of color in the sky. And you remember that the Yellow Channel looked a lot like it, but it didn't have a lot in the sky. So I'm gonna say, Take what used to be in the Magenta Channel and bring it down to zero. So there's nothing there and replace it with what used to be in the yellow. So I'm just gonna take 100 in the young so that now I've come in here and dial it in the way I need to for the hat. And now I want to make some fine tuning in this. I might try some of the other sliders. I'm gonna try Scion and see what happens if I push Maurin. That means more ink. I could move in the opposite direction, though, to take Inc out. I don't know if you remember what science looked like, but the car was pretty much white, wasn't it? In the Science Channel. And so if I used that information to pull it out, it shouldn't pull it out of the car because the car was white. It should pull it out of the other areas of the picture where it actually had some stuff. Do you remember the Scion Channel had stuff in the sky because with a blue sky would be a lot of Sai in there. So if I pull us the opposite direction, I can use that to pull it out of my sky. So I don't have much red in the sky. Uh, like I could pull way out if I want. Then we removed all sorts of ink from the bottom part of the photograph, and I think I need to push more in. I'm gonna push more in by using black. So I'm gonna change this menu to black and I'm just gonna tell it. Why don't you take some of what used to be in the Science Channel and put it in here? Why don't you take some of what used to be in the yellow in, Put it in here and now I think I have close to what I need. If I turn preview off, here's what we had before. Here's what we have thus far. Do you see how I got the red off the sky? Click OK, and I look in my channels panel and we're only using black and magenta ink. So if I click on Scion, here's what's in it. Nothing. So why don't we just throw away science? Because if I leave it in there when I sent it off to a printing company, they're gonna print the thing for science and go. Why did they print that? It's empty, So I'm going to throw it away when I throw it away. Photoshopped doesn't know how to make layers out of Onley, Magenta, Yellow and Black Inc So it's going to say, Well, usually it's gonna say, Do you want to flatten the image? And if so, I'd say yes, I'm also gonna throw away the yellow cause It's empty. So now we have only black and magenta, but now it's a magenta car. It's not a red car, so I'm gonna double click on the Magenta Channel, and it's gonna ask me what color I'd like to use. You see a little color square. Ah, click on it. I could use any color I wanted, but when you print on a printing press and you tell the printing company only want to print with two colors, you need to tell him what that red color is, and usually you tell them with a Pantone number, just like going to the paint store and picking out paint, and you just tell him the name of the paint. Well, you could get a Swatch book of all these colors and pick those out. So I'm gonna click over here on something called Color Libraries. And that's where I can pick Pantone colors. Type in the number 1 85 the most common red. You using a newspaper? It'll pick that color so it's no longer magenta. Look OK, now this image is being reproduced out of only two colors of ink reading in black ink and let's choose undo a few times to see the difference between the original and what I've ended up with. There's the original. Here's my end result, considering we're going from four colors of ink toe only two. I don't think it looks that bad. If I was praying to color brochure and I wanted to not just use my two colors most of time people to do to color brochures, they use one color for maybe their headline or something. Another color for the body text, and they use black and white photos because it's or they'll use what's called a do a tone where it's just a tinted photo. But they won't do it in such a way where the color is used completely selectively throughout that image on. And if you do things look much more special, I think. But it takes a lot more knowledge, and it takes a lot more skill and time to be able to figure that out. So for those of you that are not used to thinking about channels, uh, this is probably a quite a stretch for you. But for those of you that don't mind looking at the channels, it could be a pretty cool thing to be able to reduce your image down to only a couple colors in printed at a much lower cost in a brochure. Now, if you were gonna do this where it's not on a printing press, instead, it's on the Internet or instead it's on your desktop printers said anything else. No need to go through all this technical junk to do it. This is specific to a printing press, but if you want just a little bit of the mindset when I looked through these. Here's what I noticed. Scion car is almost not there, but the sky is So when I said Take this out of the magenta. It meant here we're using a lot. So that's where it took it out here. We're using next to nothing. So it didn't do anything Where the car waas magenta. I noticed there's just a lot up where the sky is. Car looks great, though, for magenta yellow. Oh, the car looks justus. Good. So I might as well use that cause the sky is nowhere near his dark black looks fine, but this is gonna be way too light once we remove all the other colors side of kind of shove it in there. But that's using the channel mixer in a unique way to reduce the number of colors in your picture. Not for everybody. Channel Mixer can also be used to convert your mission in black and white to convert an image to black and white. You could just be an RGB mode. Choose image adjustments or you could do adjustment layer. If you'd like Channel Mixer and in order do black and white. All you need to do is there's a check box called monochrome. If you turn it on, it's gonna give you a black and white picture. And then you can move the red slider, the green slider in the blue slider to create a unique black and white image. What it's really doing is looking at the red, green and blue channels that make up your picture, so you might want to inspect them first, just like I did when we were in seem like a mode to just get a sense for what you think might be a good mix. So some people really geek out about using the Channel Mixer to convert to black and white. I actually don't usually I find I can use the black and white adjustment layer just fine. And then after I'm done doing the black and white adjustment layer, I often end up doing curves to add contrast wherever I needed for Brighton dark in any area afterwards because I find it much more intuitive to use absolute silence going, Oh my God, what are you doing? I know, but it's an adjustment we hadn't talked about, were trying to cover them all. Ah, all right, let's see what else I mean. Actually, before I get to that, there are some adjustments we haven't talked about yet. Let's take a peek at a few. One is if I go to image adjustments. We've ignored this thing, equalize. Let's just try it on a picture. Equalized, Okay. The heck is that, Dylan? I don't know. Let's try a different one ceiling. Figure out what the heck is doing. Ah, image adjustments, equalize. Yeah, nice doing something to the sky, but otherwise the hex it doing. Let's find out. Start with something simple. This is what's known as a gray wedge, and I happen to have a great way. She doesn't have any black in it. I don't think it has any white in it, and it's got shades of gray that are not evenly distributed. If I choose image adjustments, equalize boom, What's it doing? Well, what it's doing is equalized. First, make sure the dark part of your pictures black. Next, it make sure the bright party your pictures white. Next, it looks at all the other shades that are left over in tries to equally distribute them. Equalized them, which means that if there is a lot of overly dark stuff, it's gonna redistribute it. So you have more across the full brightness range in your scene. And so that's why when I went and opened this image, there's a lot of dark stuff in here in this area. There's a lot of light stuff up here, and it's gonna try to more evenly distribute that information with equal eyes in the sky, I think is helped by that. But the dark part of the portion portion of the image I don't think ISS but equalized could be really nice when you scan something. If you scan ah logo, your scan your signature, you scan something that's simple, and it ends up coming in looking kind of dull. You know, though, apply equalize, and it at least make the bright parts white, dark parts black and making sure it's not overly dark, overly bright. It's evenly distributed equalize. Okay, what else? A match color is something we haven't talked about. It's something that actually don't use that often because I find it has a fatal flaw. But it's something we haven't talked about yet. You know, on occasion it's useful for some folks, so we might as well get into it. I want the photo in the lower right look like the photo in the upper left. So with the image down here, the image you want to change active I'm into cheese image adjustments, match color. This comes out and in here I first need to go to the bottom. Where have the choice called source, And it means what image? What I like to match. So if I look at the name of the image that's over here, I can see it's called Photo Filter. So I'm gonna click here and choose the name of that file down here, right over there. It's going to show me the image. Second confirmed that I chose the right one, and you see that already. It's trying to make it look like it, so it's analyzing the way that picture looks. Overall, it's looking at what color the highlights will come with shadows. What color are mid tones and how much contrast is there in general? And it's trying to apply the same look to my image when I'm done. I have some extra controlling here. I have luminous just in case. My image looks to brighter, too dark when I'm done, so I could bring that up to brighten, bring it down to darken the images. A whole I then have color intensity. I could bring it up or down, and it's kind of mislabeled color intensity. What it really means if I bring it up is make the colors very more said that if there's a blue in a red, make a bigger difference between the blue and red. Whereas if I bring color intensity down, it means make the color is more similar to each other. So that really means how much should the colors vary? And then we have fade, which means I might not have wanted to gone all the way to the look of the other photo. I might want to mix it with look of this photo, similar to lowering the opacity, an adjustment layer to say, apply it less. I could bring Fade up to say, Let some of the original colors show through. So maybe I just wanted to hint of the look of that other photo. I might have been able to use that when I wanted to combine two photographs that I wanted to combine together. Remember these two? Well, let's see how well it works. Sometimes it works great. Other times it just fails you. So with the image in the lower right active, I choose image adjustments, match color. I tell it, the name of the file I'd like to match. You see how it's trying. It's got a little bit of post or ization in here because of how extreme of an adjustment it's doing. But for the bird itself might be fine. Then I can say, Well, is it to brighter too dark in the end result? Do I need it to vary in color more or less and I want to go all the way to that look. But I want to back off on it a little bit. Let's say I'm constantly gonna put pictures into that other one every day. I need to put a different plane or some other object in there. Well, I could go down here in save the statistics for this. That just means save a description of what this picture looks like. So I don't actually have to have the picture open at all times. I could just hit the load button and load that back in, and it would remember what it would look like. You could use those buttons I never have, but you could then finally, in there. Sometimes match color is used when you have just one image. If you have an image with an extreme color cast, and I don't know if this one will work or not, I've never tried it, and I go to match color. There's a check box called Neutralize that really means color. Correct your image. This can work really nice for extreme color casts. If you take photographs underwater, let's say under water, you get a lot of color caste. Well, if I turn on neutralize, it's going to try to color. Correct the picture. I don't usually use it on normal images, but an extreme color casts. You can often do a good job, and you see, when I turned it on here, it didn't just pull all that color out. I now have a blue sky, and I now have color on the horizon. If I bring up my color intensity and might be able to exaggerate that range of colors that's there and maybe I didn't want to go all the way to completely neutral. So I faded. They bring some of that warmth back. So you see how it could be used as a color correction tool, but mainly for extreme color casts for simple images. Other things were better. White balance curves, lots of other things. I've never tried that image. I'm surprised to work that well. Afterwards. I can always go to human saturation and bump up the color, you know, bring up saturation or vibrance him. All right, let's see what else. Well, I've never tried this either. Some people I hear take classic paintings like Rembrandts and other things that have very distinct colors in them. And they use that for their match color. And they say, I'm gonna take this Rembrandt painting, and I'm gonna force those colors and that overall moodiness and that look into my photograph. You could try it. So the image on the left kind of boring the image on the rights. Pretty exciting. What? See? Image adjustments, match color. I have no idea what this looked like. Never tried it. Ooh, that's a bit much. And that's why we have fade, weaken, fade it back. That might not be too bad if I need the colors to very more bring up color intensity needed to very less bring it down. So match color tries to match the color between two areas. Now I mentioned that it has a failing a thing that makes it less useful than it should be. And so let's look at what that failing is. Here's another light painting I made during our light paying class here a creative life, and you should be able to use match color to come into an image. And let's say I duplicate this image just to make it easier to think about. So I duplicate the image. I'll get it so you can see both at the same time. Okay? And I'm gonna make a selection in both images. So use my lasso tool. I'm going to select this purplish flower. I'm sure you guys have a better name for the color. Sure, you dio what's the name? Come on, It's a fancy name. I doesn't store in my head. I have, like, 12 names up here for color. Then I'll go to the other image and I'm going to select another area, the greenish area, because I'm saying they don't want you to think about the whole photo. I want you to think about the Purple Fire here in the green thing. Over here, I go up to image adjustments, match color, and there's a choice in here where if I tell it to work on the one image I can see right here, use the selection in the source to calculate colors. What that means really is only a pay attention to the area that was selected and the source ignore the rest of the photo. So that means in the image on the left is paying attention to only the purple flower. Then, over here, it says, hey, used the selection in the target, meaning the image I am adjusting to also calculate this. So that means ignore the rest of this image and look what it's doing. Do you see how is taking the area that I had selected? And it's making it so it matches the area had selected in the other photo. That's great. I like that. What I dislike is the following thing. Ignore selection when applying adjustment. I wish that worked. What that would mean is apply exactly this adjustment, but applying to the whole picture so that I could mask it and painted in exactly where I need to. But watch what happens to the area that's being adjusted the moment I turned that on. So here's the area that's being adjusted. When I turn this on 00 my God is working on one image first time ever. It's actually changing a little bit. If you look at the highlights right here, Do you see how they're very purple when I turn it on? Do you see how they changed in the purple? In there? Changed. Usually when I turn it on, the area that was being adjusted changes radically What this check box should do. What it should mean is applied the exact same adjustment that I'm applying to the small area. But applying to the whole picture in that way, I could very precisely mask it later on in be very good at using it. But I find when I turn on that track box, it screws up the adjustment 99% of the time. I was surprised this one looks a similar as it does because then I could mask it and get it to be exactly where I needed to be. So match color has a lot of features in it. It's kind of an interesting adjustment. You're welcome to experiment with it, but I would use it so much more if that one check box at the top actually worked and made it. So it just applied that adjustment for the whole image but doesn't quick question then eso So my asked, can use match color between an image and a color palette between an image in a color palette. Um, not sure what she means. If she means a color palette like what you'd have in an index color image or what, and if so, no, not that I can think of. You would have to apply that color palette, toe an image, just open an image, make a Grady Int. Let's say that has all those colors, then you could try it, but still, I don't think it's gonna be that useful. I think it would be more useful to either used the Grady Int map feature that we use previously or to use something called indexed color mode, something we're not going to talk about. It's not very useful images. So if you want to match within one image, you have to make a copy. Uh, if I come in here in choose match color, the source can be set to the same document. And then I would simply tell it a different layer to use. So it's like you have more than one layer. Just set the source to the same as you have used it, for example, to re color the tulips as of those two lips. Well, that's where I really wish that check box would have you talked about in here. You know that the tulips. I think you let sorry soothe e Could have used in here to re color this. Yeah, you know, way kind of todo today. Yeah, I could have done select color range, and I could try to select the yellows that are in here. Let's say, uh, if I were to somehow get on lee the yellows. No se Could you use color match and say, take the yellows and match them to the reds using color match? Well, some with that is to get them to match the yellows match the reds I would need a selection in both so that it doesn't think about the entire doctor. And so I can't have two different selections in the same document, right? So I'd have to have two separate documents in that case. Just duplicate the layer, duplicate the document, and I'd have to select the yellows in here. So that's all it works on. And it have to have the red selected and the other one so. But if it was the image as a whole, if it was more like these two images and they're in the same document, I could have done it. I could have just said, match the other layer. So a couple more questions about color matching or coming in sure sees reflecting Starlight from Hawaii saying in match color, Why did you just select the green flower? Rather than selecting the whole image to enter the new color into, I could have attempted to make a completely precise selection of the green flower. And had I done that, it might have worked. But I find that very frequently right around the edge, where it's touching another object. It will influence what the end result is. Get giving me, and it won't produce exactly what I want. And that's the one thing that really don't like is I need to have an absolutely precise selection. And I would rather have something I could paint on a mask with to fine tune, Uh, and it makes it just less useful. But if you can make the perfect selections to begin with and you find it doesn't mess up the calculation of how it works, then it can be useful. I've used it before. Do like match fabric colors. You have model wearing one color of sweater, and in the catalogue, they decided we're not gonna carry that color. We carry this color instead, and we don't have a photo for it. So I'm like, Well, can you take a photo right here? You know, just standing here with your IPhone or something of that color we are going to use, and I could say, Okay, fine. We're going to select their sweater very precisely. And now do match color to that sweater and boom could look when you're a magician, don't let the client watch. Make them think it took hours. Thank you. Cool. Thank you. Friends. Tricks Betty s do these color options? Adjustment options work with smart objects. Do they work with smart objects? So if I come in here and I convert for a smart object and I come in Well, first off match color isn't going to be available when I come down here and look in this list. Match color is not available as a adjustment layer. This is a smart object. When I come in here, match colors not available the only two that are available or HDR toning and shadows and highlights. So unfortunately, no, that really meant I didn't know. But I'll go look and tell you the answer when I have, um, let's see. And I think we have one more coming in. Carroll Star 22 is asking Can you use the match color to add skin tones from a color picture to a black and white picture? Um, I haven't tried that particular use eso Let's see if we have a skin tone and we have, and let me just, uh, auto color. Correct this quick and then convert this to just pull the color out. Okay, That's gonna be my image. I want to adjust. Is this guy guy girl I just met. This guy is a The document is a comment as to the documents. Contents don't get me in trouble now. That's my wife. All event is I want this to match this. Now the problem with this is going to be to start with is we don't just have skin tones. And so the green in the background is gonna be influenced if I don't have a selection. So over here in this image, I would make a selection, and I would have it. So that selection includes bright areas of skin, dark areas of skin and nothing else. Something like that to give it a representation of the range of skin. Then over in this picture, I would usually make a precise selection of the area that I wanted to change. So I'm not sure that the quick selection tool is going to do great on a black and white, but it might do good enough, but this selection would need to be very precise so that because I can't expand the area later on and so I don't want to get just a basic selection. And it's all because that one check box that's called ignore selection when applying adjustment doesn't work, get rid of the hair because I don't want it to influence the way it's thinking about the contrast. So we have that selected. And now let's go over here and do a match color. Will you tell it to use the image that's on the left to match? We tell it to use the selection in that image and use the selection in this image. And here's my end result. Right now I'll take command age to hide the edges, and I'd say it looks a little light. So we have a Luminant slider. We could try to bring that down a little because we were getting really bright highlights. It might be because I have the Intan area within this more up here. Then I can bring up color intensity, get more variation or if it's very too much, I think her left arm looks pink, right arm looks yellow. I could bring that down to say, don't vary so much, but this is the kind of a change I'm gonna be getting there. So it all depends on your quality standards. If that's good enough or not. It's pretty awesome, all right, not color. Well, I think we're good on questions for a while. You will continue. Sounds good, all right. There's one other adjustment that I think we haven't talked about yet. It's not an adjustment that gets used all that often, but we're trying to cover him also might as well. But if you go to the image menu, choose adjustments we've covered that did that that we did that. That that what haven't we done way did come and look out posterized. We haven't done posterized yet. Post rise. Not very exciting. All posterized does is reduced the number of brightness levels in your image in the number of colors in your image. You bring up posterized, and it's pretty much asking how many colors dough I want. It's not exactly the number of colors it'll actually most likely be this times. Three. Because it's doing this to each of the channels that make up your invention. You have three channels red, green and blue. If this was a grayscale picture, it would mean only give me four shades of gray in the entire picture, and as I brought it up, you could get more and more shades. So if you ever want to have stair stepping in your sky or anything like that, you're welcome to use this to get that effect. But this would not be all that common of, ah, adjustment to want to apply to a normal photo. I used it, though. What I did is I created a new document, and in that new document, I made a Grady Int Grady int that went from black to white. So with the Grady int tool, I just clicked over here, dragged us. Why made that Grady in? And I wanted this to have what's notices to be what's known as a step wedge driven, that simple document used earlier that just had the little shades of grey. So I took this and just said image adjustments. Posterized and I told it, How many shades do I want? And I was able to get one of those simple documents to demo. The only problem with this one is if you look closely at it, you'll find the edges are specially, and that's just because when I created the Grady Int that I'm using, this check box was on right here dither means add noise to the radiant, and I'm seeing that noise in here. If I had that turned off, those would be crisp edges. So post arises, not something they need to use on a daily basis. If I want my picture to look bad, sometimes you want that is a special effect to make it look retro or some other thing. Posterized can do it, but otherwise image adjustments post arises one of the least used adjustments in my toolkit. So let's see if there's anything else we're missing in there. We did that that that we did do that when I had an extreme image. It was some sort of street sign. We've done vibrance, this invert posterized threshold, great map, selective color. They share toning. We did that. Remember when I wanted to look that didn't even look like a photo? It look kind of odd that did that. De saturate is exactly the same is going into the human saturation dialogue box in bringing the saturation down to zero. It's just a short cut, and it's the worst way of converting image to black and white. It will end up making colorful to colorful areas look identical instead of having a difference between them. So I don't use de saturate for converting images to black and white. We used to match color. We even used replace color him. We used equal that we've used every single adjustment. That's pretty impressive, actually. But with those adjustments, think about it for a minute. And my brain separates those adjustments up into ones that Onley affect brightness. If that's what I'm looking to target, these air the adjustments I go for or if I want to make the image warmer or cooler or possibly perform color correction because that's part of it. The image looks to warn to cool. Those are my choices to attempt to do that, or if I want to work more like the way my brain does. Where I think about Hughes saturation and brightness, those are my choices to go to and these air the specialty adjustments. This is from an older version of photo shop, so there'd be one more at least one more in there. But it's anything that was not neos other groups. So when I look at it, my brain is thinking about the various categories to figure out what it is. I want to adjust. But in the end, I just get rid of brightness and contrast. For my mind, I don't use it. Curves could do that. When I think about levels, I don't use it. Curves could do that, although levels is fine if you want to do something simple, and I just want to do it hurry. But curves conduce a all of what brightness and contrast all of what levels could do. So I just don't need to think about those two. Exposure is not useful on just day to day images, so I don't need to use it. So within that top category curves, that's what I used to replace them all, Um, then color balance. I replaced with curves because color balance allowed me to shift things to make him warm and cool, just like curves. But instead of being limited to using highlights mid tones and shadows and curves, I just click on my picture. I don't care if it's a highlight of Midtown shadow or something in between, it can target it, so I have more control if I know how to use it. If I don't know how to use curves I might need to use color balance, black and white. A use for black might photos. That's great photo filter for some specialty things and all that. But if you look at these, I find the most useful ones to be curves in human saturation on a daily basis. And then on occasion, I need to pop over to black and white in on occasion, I need to use match color to match two things. You know, that kind of stuff. I pop around to some of the others, but if you look at the vast majority of my images, you're gonna find a tremendous number of curves and hue and saturation adjustment layers and on occasion, a couple of the others, huh? If you find you never use a few of those adjustments, you just find you never click on. Then being in that menu here is just cluttering your mind, trying to make it so it takes more time to choose the ones you do use. You should be aware that you could go to the edit menu, and there's a choice within the edit menu called Menus. You can turn stuff off in voter shop just go over here to image, choose adjustments, turn off the eyeballs and junk you don't use. They won't even show up in this menu anymore. You can always access them with keyboard shortcuts, or I'll show you one other method. But all turn off the ones that I don't really need. Click. OK, now when I go to that menu much shorter, much easier to get to the ones I do use and look what it says at the bottom. If I've hidden any, um, I get him back temporarily just by choosing that bottom choice the next time I click away and I come back the menu short again. So why not hide? The junkie Don't use makes it a little bit simpler if he asked me, all right, a couple of their little details and then we can start wrapping things out. Ah, when you create a new document, or when you scan image or when you open a raw file, there's a setting that's being used. It determines how much information Photoshopped gets to work with, and the choices are either eight bits of information or 16 bits. So when I go up here toe Teoh photo shop and go to the file menu. Choose new. I can choose it right there if I open a raw file. If I find a raw file, there's one in camera at the bottom of my screen. There's a line of text. If I click on it, I determine it right there. If I'm in my scanning software, then there usually a pop up menu. Choose between eight and 16 minutes. What the heck does that mean? When should I care? And how's it gonna help me? Eight bits means you get 256 brightness levels in your picture. 256 is enough to make your picture look normal. Print normal and be fine the time that those extra shades would help. Because if you get a 16 bit, you get thousands upon thousands of shades of brightness in your picture is on Lee. When you're gonna make an extreme adjustment and Photoshopped, I mean, you're going to take an image like this one and pull out all the shadow detail. It's on the right side. I want to see people standing on this mountain if they're there. Well, if you make an extreme adjustment like that when you image Onley contains 256 brightness levels. There's just not that much in there, so when you brighten it up, your image gets posterized. Remember when I ran the posterized command, you got stair stepping. That's what it could look like. And if you end up using 16 bits instead, there'd be a lot more information. You can get a smoother end result, so it's mainly gonna help you when you do extreme adjustments. The problem with using 16 bit is it doubles your file size. All your files you ever use are gonna be twice as big. And if you start adding layers, it becomes even more of a problem. Maybe it's four times a big or even more than that, depending on how many layers he end up putting in your file. So it's something that can cause a problem when it comes to managing file size. If you ever hear anybody try to talk you into using 16 bit, don't listen to what they say. Instead, ask them to show you the difference. They condemn scribe it all they want, but ask them. Show me an image that looks better by being processed in 16 bit, and if they cannot display one cannot show you one. Then say thanks for the advice and ignore it now if they can show you one, and I can then listen to really intently and use it for those kinds of images that they're talking about. So let me just show you an image where it would benefit from it. Then I'll talk about. I find it's useful to work with 16 bits of data. When you stitch a panorama, I find if I don't use 16 bits of data when you stitch your panorama, oftentimes my skies will not look smooth. I will seize little hints of lines across my sky. So here's a panorama that I shot in once I stitched It is eight bits of information and I stitched it a second time in 16 minutes. Right now, you're looking at the 16 bit and results. It's kind of hard to see exits rather dark in here, so I'm gonna turn on a curves adjustment layer where all it does is bright in the picture. Ignore the part where the sun is. I wasn't trying to get detail. There was just trying to have it more easy to see this area. So this was 16 bits of info. Let me show you what it looked like when I stitched it with only eight. Can you see that this is 16? That was eight. I hope that's going out over the compressed Internet feed, but most of the time 16 bits worth of information. You will not see the difference. But I find stitching. Panoramas is when I see it the most, and especially after stitching a panorama. If I ever used the healing brush to try to smooth areas out, it doesn't end up smooth if he ever used the healing brush. When you heal across an area, the end result doesn't look smooth. Try going to 16 bit and try it again. But I only use 16 bit when I think it might be helpful. Otherwise, I want my file size so darn big. Yeah, question. The other thing that I had heard from a previous clients with a similar demonstration is when there is Grady int throughout something that long of a stretch, it helps the radiance really blend in. That is the time it might help is when you're trying to get a transition from one color to another to go over really wide area, especially if those two colors are very similar to each other. So you're having a subtle transition over really wide area happens. A lot in Panorama is happens a lot of times when you have nice sky at the top of your picture. If it takes up a lot of space and it goes from one shade of blue to a slightly different shade, but way up there, then you might find it and look a smooth. But it will be relatively rare unless you're working on a panorama. So I find that a lot of people would never notice the difference in their file. Sizes are already really big. Computers are going really slow. But if you do panorama so you have those really nice radiance over long distances. That's when it's gonna help. Yeah, if you've imported something as an eight bit and then you change it to 16 bit, is that gonna show in picks, elation? Or does it? If it No, If you end up having an eight bit filed to begin with and you convert it to 16 bit It's like, How would I say it? You had a one car garage in your house and you just bought a two car garage, the only own one car. It's just a bunch of empty space not being used in the file, meaning you don't have enough data to fill 16 bits worth of info. You're only using eight bits of it, but it's in a 16 bit rapper, meaning the file size went up to make room for those extra shades. But your picture doesn't actually contain those extra shades. They didn't start with him. He would have to start with him. That means your camera would have to deliver more than eight bits where your scanner would have to be set to more than eight bits or something else. Just taking it bit file. Bringing it up to bit doesn't add any information. It just makes room for more information. Um, it can still be helpful to do that if you're going to use the healing brush to heal across an area. And it wasn't giving you smooth results, bringing it up to 16 bit. The healing brush is end. Result might produce those extra shades. Eso it can create a smoother and result. But just converting up to 16 bit didn't add anything other than the ability to have more shades. Even though your image still has 256 shades, it's using a tool like the healing brush, where it might suddenly add some extra shades that it could be useful. But the main reason I want to mention that is a lot of people bring up 16 debt, and they mention it in such a way as if everybody should use it. And so everybody listens and they end up doubling or tripling or quadrupling their file sizes. But very few of those people would ever notice the difference. And I said I wanted to give you some examples of when you might. So for those of you that have images like that, you might want to use 16 bit for the rest of you. If you want to save file size, you could try out eight. I see somebody in the chat rooms here who they say that they have an image of a sunset and there's a Grady in in the sky, and it is a 16 bit image, but they're still seeing some banning happening. Do you have any idea of what's going on there? Well, it can be due to an adjustment, or it can be the way that camera captured it. But if it has banding, what I would do is I would grab the healing brush with a big brush, hard edge brush, and I would paint across that banding The width of the brush is going to what I say it. Let me see if I just do it. I'm not sure if this will work in a synthetic image meaning image. I create myself. But let's say I had a sky. And within that sky waas um, the sunset, they said. So there was this shade and somewhere else there was the shade and the rest of it I might as well fill it with the rest. Let me. Okay, so this this represents banding where this color should be a smooth transition into this one, but isn't so. If I grab the healing brush and I tell it to copy from a smooth area, sometimes it just create a brand new document full of white and tell it to copy from that just option click within a white document can work. But if you do it from your own image in an area where it doesn't have the banding to be better because if there's any noise, any grain in your picture, it will pick up that grain and use it so the image will look consistent. But I'm gonna just option click over here and I'm going to say right here, You see, how just created that smoother transition. So if I had banding in my picture, I want to use the healing brush. I want to get a big enough brush where have space to fade out if you give it a tiny brush. So I'm gonna have that tiny amount of space to create that fadeout pain across a wider. It's gonna have a wider area to fade it out, and you go to a smooth area within your picture. That's where you copy from. Does not matter what color the smooth area is could be blue, yellow, orange, pink. I don't care. It only matters that is smooth. It doesn't have banding it. Then come over there paint, however far you need here, being all the way there, it will blend all the way across their here. I might need to blend those two pieces together. Let's see if I can they so you can smooth out the skies. Now if you find that this tool when you use it isn't giving you smoothness, go to 16 bit for use it, and therefore it can use more shades when it blends those things together. Perfect. And you just answered. I was just going to a shade K was asking, If you go to 16 bits to get us me their transition with the healing brush, then you go back to when you're done. Would I go back to eight when I'm done? Well, let's find out on my panorama First off, if it would be if it would help it all. So here's my 16 bit image, and I'm gonna convert it to eight bit. We never you convert to eight bid. If you have any adjustment layers in your image, it would be best if you flatten your image first. But now my 16 bit image has been converted to eight bit, and it still looks smooth. It really depends on the image. How wide that radiant ISS with wider it is, the more it needs to be in 16 bit. But if it's not that wide and it's got some poster ization that the healing brush fixes, just switch, tape it and look at it. Does it still look smooth? If so, you're fine. If it doesn't look smooth, choose, undo and stay in 16 bit. Huh? I use that on 32 bit is used for HDR. If you ever have multiple exposures that you combined together using a command that is called tools photo shop, merge to HDR Pro that produces a 32 bit image. But other than that, no, I wouldn't use 30 to that. There's just each time you go up one bit, you double the number of shades you can have. So, Mr Math over here eight Vince's to 9 bits would be twice at 5 10 bits would be twice that. So 1024. Now what number we re at 11 bits would be 2048. Uh, what number? We were 12. Seen My brain is like numbers 2048 4096 or something like that. You know, each time you go apply one. You double the number of shades. 16 bits is enough. 65,536. It's actually a little bit shy of that because they use one bit for other purposes. But it's close, so 16 bits can get you up to about 60,000 brightness levels. He never need more than that. So all right, Alrighty. Let's see one last thing, and that is some people, um, when you convert when some people need to end upon a printing press, if that's you, it's not most people, but on occasion there, somebody needs go to a printing press. When you convert your image to see him. Why K mode? It needs to be converted to that at some time. If you don't do it, you're printing company. Better do it before they print it before they output it, and you should communicate with them if you don't want to do it so they dio. But when you do that, oftentimes it will ask you this question and I find the people love layers, and so oftentimes they click this button, whereas any time I converting image to seem like a mode, I always click that button. Why? Well, let me show you. Look at this image. I'm gonna say, Don't flatten it. Watch what happens to my glow. Did you see a change? Choose, Undo. There's before there's after. Oh, people see that and they complain about seeing like a mode. What they should be complaining about is that they didn't merge their layers. If I go back over here and she's image mode seemed like a and it asks me, there's a reason it's asking you. A lot of things are more difficult to do and see. In my K mode, the document is more complex. Instead of having three parts, it has four r g b vs C m I K. And it makes it so. A lot of things just can't be done quite. It's elegantly there. But if I choose flattened, look at the difference, not mincing. When I came out, I choose undo. There's RGB. There seemed like a they look the same right, But when I don't flatten, there is much greater tendency of the image to look different. And so I know you love layers, but keep your layers in your RGB image and that's your master file, then, when somebody else needs to seem like a file, just choose image mode seemed like a flattened when it asked you save as so you can give them their file and then you trash that file. Keep your RGB file. That's your master, that everybody needs to seem like a file again. Do the same thing. It just seemed like a save as flattened when it needs to give it to them. If you need to make changes to your image, go back to your later it RGB file. Make those changes, but know that what I showed you here is not the cause of every shift you'd ever get when converting to see him when I came out. It's just one of them, so sometimes you will get colors shifting because you can't reproduce, is wide of a range of colors and see why came out so some colors might need to shift. Just so you know, it's not always due to that. Sometimes it's because you didn't flatten your image. Uh, let's see. All right, Well, uh, got any questions? We questions are always endless. So you would be here all night. We've probably should kind of rough up. Do you have any final thoughts that you'd like to share? Or any kind of Yeah, in general, when you think about adjustments and Photoshopped and you go up here and choose adjustment. So where you go to the adjustment layer menu, think first about what you're comfortable with. That's what you're going to gravitate towards and just ultimately, when it comes to adjusting brightness and when it comes to doing color correction, I would try to aspire to getting comfortable with curves, because by getting comfortable with curves and using curves for most things, you can replace so many more of these adjustments so that you get a one familiar place all the time. But it takes practice with that. So the best thing is to use the files that I used for class here to practice all the stuff. We did do it multiple times until it becomes second hand second nature of all the stuff we did with curves, and once you do that, you don't have to go to brightness and contrast anymore. You don't have to goto levels anymore. You don't have to go to things like color balance anymore. And so this list that looks like a lot start shrinking down, then get used to human saturation. Practice what we did practice on the same images I used Intel. It's second nature, and then the combination of those two is going to be so powerful that you're gonna be able to do so much with your image. Then the other ones pop to him when you need him. But it might not be every day and, you know, go there when you need to. Then get used to adjustment layers because that's the best way of applying these. And you're just going to stack up a bunch of adjustment layers as you work on your images. Work on the biggest problem first, and then the next problem that's left and just keep tackling the biggest one until you run out of either time patients or problems in whatever that happens, you're done. I save my layered files. Is either Photoshopped file format or tiff. It's a personal choice. Technically, there is not a big difference between the two. They both give you the same quality. When you open the image, they look identical in all of that. Eso choose one of those to file formats. And then when you need to give a file to somebody else, I don't usually give him my layered file unless they really need it. Instead, I'll go up to the file Minion to save ass and save him out another file format like J peg her tiff or something else. And I'm not gonna give my layers most of the time. And the more you practice, the better you're gonna get. And I just hope that what we did here today helps to get on the road to looking at that menu. When Ugo, in being better at using what's there, be able to tackle whatever you need.

Class Description


Part of the Complete Photoshop Mastery Bundle. Become an adjustment master by learning how Adobe® Photoshop® thinks about color and tonality. You'll go way beyond the basics and learn how to use the most powerful, precise and versatile adjustments. You'll also see how all of the Adobe Photoshop adjustment options relate to one another so that you'll be able to easily pick the best tool for the job at hand. • Scanning Line Art (pure black and white graphics like your signature) • Optimizing Grayscale Images • Professional Color Correction Techniques • Matching the color between multiple images • Getting the most out of adjustment layers • Color Manipulation Techniques • Sharpening Strategies


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CS6

Reviews

Shannon
 

As always, Ben surpassed my expectations. His easy style of sharing his experience is fun and inspiring. He is completely prepared and that makes his workshops flow smoothly. I feel like he's thoroughly comfortable with Photoshop. Thank you, creativeLIVE and Ben for bringing yet another terrific workshop to the masses.

a Creativelive Student
 

Wow, just watched the bonus content, loved it all, particularly the color theory basics! Thanks Ben for the extra effort and thanks CL!

a Creativelive Student
 

this sounds like help from heaven. I dearly wish i will be able to catch up with everything Ben has to teach!