Exporting Images for Clients

 

Powerful Portraits using Mirrorless Cameras

 

Lesson Info

Exporting Images for Clients

And I do this every single time, every single file, always do Save As, and whenever you're using Capture One, and you set up your session, so, before I started my tether, I went to File, New Session, I named it Creative Live day one, and hit OK, and when I did that, it actually sets up this folder that looks like this. So you'll see, Capture folder, this is where all of the pictures go when you're tethered and you're taking pictures. They all get dumped into this capture folder. You'll have an Output folder, a Selects folder, and a Trash folder. This is set up automatically by the software when you set up that new session. So with that in mind, I'm gonna go back to Photoshop, and I'm gonna go to File, Save As, and I'm actually gonna go and, we're inside of that folder, Go back to it here, so this is the capture folder, we'll go to CL Day one, I'm gonna go to Output, so I'm gonna save any edited files that I edited in Photoshop, and again everybody has their methods, this is my Miguelit...

o method, I'm gonna save this edited photo in the output folder, I'm not gonna save it as a tiff, because the file's gonna be massive, I'm actually gonna save it as a Photoshop or a psd file, that will retain all of the layers for me to go back if I need to make adjustments. And I'll just go ahead and hit Save, and you can check Layers, make sure that's checked off, 'cause you don't wanna lose all of the adjustments to where, if you need to change them later, you're SOL. Hit save, it's gonna say Maximize Compatibility, hit OK. You'll see down in the bottom it's gonna take a little bit, it will save. And now if you go into the Output folder, whenever it's done, you'll see that psd file here. And usually what I'll end up doing in this Output folder, is I'll create an edits folder, and I'll dump that psd in an edits folder, I'll make a print folder, which is where I save the high res jpeg that I'm gonna show you in a sec, and I'll make a web folder, where I save a smaller quality photo, that I'll adjust and upload for Facebook and Instagram, and Twitter and all that good stuff. So to save this for the web, you're going to go to Export, and you're gonna go to Save for Web Legacy. This is my personal method, you could do Export As, but what I've found is, if you do Export As, sometimes the color changes from what you see on your screen to what it saves as a jpeg, I don't know why, I don't know if that's like a glitch, or what the deal is, but whenever I do Save for Web Legacy, which is the old, tried and true way that I used to do it, it always works, and you never have any problems. So, this will open up a dialogue box here. We'll back up. And so, this is basically your Save for Web dialogue, so from here, you can choose to save this as a jpeg, png eight, 24, gif, wbmp, you could save this as a jpeg if you're trying to export this for somebody at high res to have them print it out, these are the settings, this is how I do it. I literally just go to Save for Web Legacy, jpeg, maximum, quality 100, optimize, embed color profile, everything that you see here, I basically just hit Save, and it'll save it as a high res jpeg. If I was doing this for the web, it's a little different, I actually choose png 24, and that usually takes a second for it to convert it from where it is right now to converting it into a png. If your hard drive is not super massively full like mine is, sometimes it works a little bit faster, but from here, what I'll end up doing is, once it switches to png, I'll go to the percentage area down here, and instead of having 100%, I'll change it to 25%. 'Cause I don't want 100% quality image being posted to the web, because there, that's when you run into issues, where all of a sudden you'll find your image in print somewhere, and you're like, what is this? And it's credited to some other photographer, how did they get my high res shot? Well if you post a high res image on the web, you're kind of opening yourself up. If you change this to 25%, it's gonna make the file a little bit smaller, so they may still be able to print it out, but it may not be a full size print. The other thing is, if you look here on the left bottom corner, you'll see that as a png, it's at now, 49 megs, when I save this photograph, this is a 42 megapixel file. So it's much bigger than a jpeg, is basically what I'm getting at. So, I'll go ahead and I'll put 25%, and it'll take a second, it's gonna reformulate, and at 25% size, it's still 3.6 megs. That's still a pretty big file for the internet, and I don't really want it to be that big, so maybe I'll do like, 13%. And at 13% what I'm really trying to get at is to get this file to be under one meg. So in this case, 988 seems good enough to me. So I'll go ahead and hit Save, and again I would go back into that same folder, it's saved as a png, and just hit Save, and it's done. That would be my web size image. So, jpeg, save, go back into it again, png, 10, 15, 20, 25, whatever it is that it takes to get you under one meg, and then that's what you're gonna upload onto Facebook, and social media, and all that good stuff.

Class Description

"Miguel's class was exactly what I needed! He lets you in on his practical and streamlined approach to creating dramatic portraits that deliver every time, and I can't wait to use his 'Jedi' posing techniques." - April, CreativeLive Student

Allowing your subjects to feel relaxed and natural when taking their portrait can be a challenge, especially when you’re worried about the technical side of your camera while interacting with clients. Join Sony Artisan Miguel Quiles as he discusses the pros of choosing mirrorless cameras to focus on the creative side of your images. Most mirrorless cameras are built around the same size sensors and have similar lens options as DSLRs. Become more portable while staying professional with your lightweight camera.

Miguel will share:
  • How to use the correct lighting when shooting with a mirrorless camera   
  • Tethering techniques using Capture One   
  • Why it’s important to develop the connection with your subject for a stronger image 
  • Techniques to help you focus more on the creative parts of an image and less on the technical aspects   
By the end of this class, you will feel more confident connecting with your portrait subjects, and less concerned with how you use your camera to take the image.  

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

I want to commend you for hosting Miguel Quiles. He is beyond competent and knowledgeable. Light is Light, but It is encouraging to see incredible minority photographers on your platform and to see diversity in the presenters. It is inspirational for minorities to see themselves on the center stage. I sincerely thank you for that. I am buying this course although I am not a mirrorless shooter because of my support of Miguel and the quality of his instruction of which benefits all photographers. He is a great addition to the Creative Live Family of Presenters that I have supported as well. Kudos Creative Live!

Danae Khan Jones
 

Wow! As a Newb and someone looking to get into portrait/studio photography, this course was perfect and comprehensive. SO MUCH GOOD CONTENT. Miguel is so approachable about questions, positive, and thorough in his explanations. This course broke down the gear and technical side very well. I recommend going to a class live. It was a great experience with food and beautiful facilities. The facility has a positive vibe and really encouraged me to be creative. Thank you for the experience and knowledge!

Sharon
 

WOW!!! I LOVED THIS CLASS!!! I learned so much. He made lighting soooo simple, I finally understood. I liked the way he explained the why of his camera settings and how to overcome ambient light. he explained and made everything simple!!! I liked the way he talked about connecting with your clients. I am so happy I purchased this class. I finally understood lighting What a great teacher!! Thank you!!