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Using Photoshop Channels

Lesson 8 of 8

Add Spot Colors to a Channel

Jason Hoppe

Using Photoshop Channels

Jason Hoppe

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Lesson Info

8. Add Spot Colors to a Channel

Lesson Info

Add Spot Colors to a Channel

How do you do? Spot colors and photo shop spot colors and photo shop. Where? Under image mode. Is there a spot color? Hold there isn't. So guess where we use spot colors on a channel. Go figure. Oh, my gosh. It's amazing how that works. So I'm gonna pick a color here Something nice and sunny and bright. And there we go on a vacation. Pick something nice. Fought there when the client definitely has to have this in they spot color. Okay, there it is. Track that'll tighter. A little bit bigger. I think we need just a little bit more delicious Yellow. There we go. Awesome. This isn't a spot color. By the way, This is just a standard color. If you go into a color picker, we can go through when we can go all to the spotlight, watch libraries And I can pick any Pantone color that I want their it iss. But it's just a Pantone reference because we're still in RGB mode image mode. Yeah, we're still in RGB, so how can you have a spot color and rgb when you can't really? So I need to turn this into...

an actual Pantone color so that it's there as a Pantone color. So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna command click on this layer. So I get this election, I'm gonna turn off my type player. I just command clicked on it to get the selection. Now I'm gonna go to my channels here, and I'm going to create a new channel right there. And there's my channel right there. And what I'm gonna dio with this, Actually, no, I'm not gonna create a new channel yet. Delete. Yes. I wanted to leave that. Okay, so I want to go in, and I want to create a spot channel. So if I go into my channel right here, a couple things that are interesting you for double click on a channel here. What you can see is when you double click, you can see the mask areas or the selected areas. We could do a spot color, and it's like, Mm. But this is the only way that you can get to it. Okay, so I go back, click on my composite here. I'm gonna go back yet. In fact, just gonna diesel like this to go back to buy channels here to create a new channel right there. And I'm actually gonna fill the whole thing with White because that's going to be clear. And then with this channel to go back to my layers, I'm gonna command click on my type player to activate that Think so. I command click on there and here's my channel Right there. So now I've got this and I need this to be a spot color. But a double click on my new channel on Mattel It I wanted to be a spot color and I want the color to be 100% solid. And I'm gonna pick the color, be it this color picker here. So I click on there, click on my color libraries. I go into my Pantone ones here I go down to the yellow that they chose on a click. OK, I do that And now I need to fill this with something solid like black so that my color will actually show up. So when I feel that in here, that's my Pantone color White is not existent. This is my Pantone color. Looks like yellow, doesn't it? No, of course not. Because we cannot display color in a channel. It's on Lee black and white. But in order for the yellow to show up in the intensity that we want, we need to put in something that's going to be intensify. Use a gray. The yellow is going to be not quite full intensity. So I fill this with black and I d select it. There is my spot color channel. It named itself because I called it a spot color channel double clicked on there, and now that I double click on it, I can change the color if I want to. But it's got to be a spot color channel now. If I go to my layers panel in here, go back, click on your composite. By the way, I'm gonna turn on my spot color channel. There it ISS now. What's weird is that I could go to my layers panel here and I could get rid of my type player. And this freaks people out. If I get rid of my type player here, they're looking through the entire layer here, trying to find out Where is this? It's not anywhere. It's not in this image. I don't see this anywhere. I can't go in and get this. This is truly a spot color, truly spot color, and we Onley see that in our channels, it doesn't even exist in her layers Here doesn't exist. I know. And here's the interesting thing about this. It over prints, everything. We're not sorry, not over, prince. It knocks out everything, so it looks like it's printing on top of this, but it actually knocks everything out because channels don't have a position where they go. It's not like a layer where this is on top of this. A channel is just simply means of selection and just showing you the information in there. So then the client comes in and they want a bevel and boss on this spot color. I know the things that clients ask for. So of course they say, Yeah, sure, Easy. So I create a new layer, and this is gonna be my bevel and emboss right there. I command click on my channel cause that's the only way that I could get my selection. I go to my layer and then I need to fill this layer with something in order to be able to get the bevel in and boss because I can't devil in in boss nothing. So I go in and I fill this with black doesn't show up because the spot color channel is master of all. So I have it on their way to de select. That looks black, right? Of course not, because it's behind by spot channel. Then I go in and I create my bevel in boss and I make it look thoroughly delicious, like so there it is. And then I take and I turned my fill layer down to zero. Now I have a bevel in and boss with a spot color on a textured background with everything, and that's how you channels that easy.

Class Description

Channels are a hidden yet incredible way to make extremely accurate selections for color correction as well as a way of isolating images for background removal. Jason Hoppe will walk through how to make the most of them in a variety of scenarios, including how they can be used in creating high-contrast B&W images quickly and easily. He'll show how for hard to select areas such as hair, channels make it much easier to isolate and remove subjects from a background without using the traditional selection tools. He'll also show how to get a more effective color correction and adjustment workflow by isolating your color channels.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

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