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Using Photoshop Channels

Lesson 2 of 8

Isolate Channels For Color Correction

 

Using Photoshop Channels

Lesson 2 of 8

Isolate Channels For Color Correction

 

Lesson Info

Isolate Channels For Color Correction

we're going to start off with just some very basic color adjusting using our channels. When I do my color adjusting, I always do them on a color adjustment layer. So I'm going to go to the bottom of my layers panel and call up a layer adjustment using curves, curves and levels. Both of these pretty easy to use and will be able to go in and target each and every individual channel. And you can see when we go into our curves. We have our drop down menu where we can specifically target the channels, the Red Channel of information, the Green Channel and the Blue Channel to adjust all those separately. So I go in and I can adjust my image overall, a little bit of contrast here, darkening the darks, lightning the lights up here and go in and do a little bit of contrast in here by creating an S curve and it creates a little bit of difference in my image. But still, it's fairly flat that there's a lot of blue in here. It just isn't popping very much. I'd like to get in here even further if I t...

arget each individual channel I can choose from a drop down menu, and I could go to my Red Channel. And here's how you can go ahead and adjust colors individually. Overall, if you're not very savvy with color adjustment, super simple things to think about or no when you get into color adjusting here with my adjustment panel. This is my highlight slider. This is my shadow slider and paying attention to my hissed a gram in here I can take and Aiken slide my highlights lighter in until my information begins to build and my shadow slider is already there. Where there's information, this is creating contrast, and in doing this, this is called per channel contrast because I'm actually going in and doing this perch handle. You'll see when I go in and I do any color adjustment here. Think of this as a light switch. So when you walk into a room, if you want light, you're going to go ahead and use the highlight button. And as you're using your highlight button, I think this is a light switch. I'm going to get more of the color of the channel that I'm on. If I would like to get less of that color of the channel that I'm on a use my shadow slider, and it will begin to take away that color, and it will begin to reveal the other channels of color. So in the Red Channel, if I'd like more red, I'm going to use my highlights lighter, which will give me more red in the shadow slider, which will take away the red overall. Now, this may look a little bit funny while we're doing this adjusting, but keep in mind that we're doing each channel separately. So in the end, we're going to get a much more pleasing look and color. But we have to go through all of the channels. If you're into shortcuts. Shortcuts here option to to get back to the composite Option three option for an option five to go through. If I go to my green channels, you can see that I can adjust my greens and Aiken really take out the greens here, and I can go ahead and add more green to this as well, and you'll see how this image starts to become a lot more contrast based on just targeting the channels. And I could go in and take out a whole lot more blue, which makes it very yellow. Do a little bit of that. Bring that in a little bit. And overall, I've got a much more contrast looking image, and I can see that by turning on and turning off my adjustment layer here. So this is really basic adjustment, just using the per channel contrast, just getting the highlights in the shadows. But I'd like to take this a little bit further here because in my image I have some certain areas that I'd like to target. I'm on my Blue Channel, and I'd like to go in and target specific blues in here. So going into my adjustment layer, if I go in, where do I pull on this ramp here to go ahead and effect certain blues to give Mawr less blue? Well, if I click on what's called Little Finger scrubby, the finger scrubby is That's what is called. It's called the fingers crabby. Laugh all you want. It is the finger scrubby. So if I click on my finger scrubby and hover my cursor over my image, you'll see that there will be a corresponding circle jumping around on my curves ramp right there. And this is where I could target the specific curves to do the most amount of adjustment in this channel. If I click directly on a location in my image, I can get my little finger scrubby, and I can drag up and down directly on my image. In order to adjust that location, you'll see that it's doing everything overall in the curves ramp because it is attached to the curve. So it's affecting everything overall, if we would like it to affect less, I could pull up in one area and then kind of flatten out my curves ramp a little bit more to do less adjustment. Overall again, this is just really simple color adjustment, just targeting each and every individual channel. So there's my blue channel. There's my green channel. I may want to target some of the green in the ocean here. I'd like to add mawr or take it out. Once you click on the fingers, Krabi, it stays depressed. Not that it's depressed. It's just on. Once I click on this finger, scrubby, I can go up and down on my image and a little goes a long way. So it's not like you're going to go in there and jump up and down on this. You can just go a little bit more and I can just move it fractional amounts, and that's going to allow me to adjust it pretty quickly and easily directly on the image. I see a little bit of pink in the clouds here. I just want to take a little bit of that out. Click on that. I can drag that down, take a little bit out of the clouds right there. So really quick color adjustment. That's what it is. We've got classes on color adjustment. In fact, I have classes on color adjustment. But this was just a really quick way to go. Win and target those areas overall to get some just really quick adjustment via channels. Now, if we go in and we're adjusting images that have been converted to see M y que, which we don't usually work in, But every once in a while we will have images that somebody has converted to see M y que you're gonna have four channels to deal with because you're gonna have your sigh in magenta yellow and black channels. RGB We only have the three. We don't normally a Justin cm like a but every once in a while that happens. So going back to our channels panel here, everything is gonna look the same. We still have our red or green and our blue channels. Everything's looking good. We can turn those off, and these are our post adjustment channels. Look pretty much the same. One quick word of advice when you're working in channels and you click through them. Always make sure you go back and click on your composite Channel because if not certain things won't work, you won't. You find certain things on adjusting correctly because you got to be on your composite in order to be able to go through and use everything that you want to dio. So really simple color adjustment just going in and targeting your channels, and you can do this via curves, and I'll show you real quick if we do this via levels. If I go and do a levels adjustment layer, you have the same adjustments here. You also have your red, green and blue, and they work very much the same. Weaken do our sliders for highlights are mid tones right there on our shadows. We don't have our little finger scrubby because we don't have a curves ramp. So this is a little bit more simplistic and what we're doing, but we can just grab those and do some very basic and quick adjustments with our channels and work on that, to be able to dial those things that really quick, but there they all are right there.

Class Description

Channels are a hidden yet incredible way to make extremely accurate selections for color correction as well as a way of isolating images for background removal. Jason Hoppe will walk through how to make the most of them in a variety of scenarios, including how they can be used in creating high-contrast B&W images quickly and easily. He'll show how for hard to select areas such as hair, channels make it much easier to isolate and remove subjects from a background without using the traditional selection tools. He'll also show how to get a more effective color correction and adjustment workflow by isolating your color channels.



Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2017

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