Volume Sports Photography

Lesson 13/39 - Transporting Your Gear

 

Volume Sports Photography

 

Lesson Info

Transporting Your Gear

All about hauling gear, setting stuff up for the shoot. We're gonna talk about getting a good work flow down the day of shooting. I'm gonna walk you guys through how we do it for our big, big, big jobs, as well as our more standard volume jobs. So, hauling gear. We have an outside gear bag. This would be if I'm going to shoot sports that would be on a field, would not be shooting green screen with this bag. This would just be outside, maybe a tennis team or a lacrosse team. I would have a 5DS, is what I shoot with. A lot of people think that's a weird camera for, like, high volume stuff. I actually bought the 5DS specifically for shooting volume because as we do big, big, big teams where I'm shooting like 110 football players, the pixel quality on the faces, the image quality, the ability to retouch, the depth of the file is big for us. And, right now, technologies, hard drives are cheap, memory cards are cheap. What's the point in having a 50 Megapixel camera if you don't shoot 50 Meg...

apixels? So, I shoot it all the time. We just let it go full bore. We bring that, 70-200, 24-70, Paul C. Buff Einstein, so it's the big one that they have that's portable. We shoot a Beauty Dish, a 580 Speedlite, a tripod, and a Vagabond mini. So, what we got is one big main light. We shoot the beauty dishes outside. I don't bring umbrellas or soft boxes outside just because it's so easy for them to get blown away. Okay, when you're setting up to shoot outside, too, word of wisdom, is whenever you take your light stand, most of them have three segments, you put your beauty dish on, that top segment you always leave down and unscrew the screw all the way, that way if the wind comes and pushes that beauty dish, it's gonna spin the beauty dish around instead of knocking your light over. First time I bought an Einstein and a beauty dish, I took it out for a shoot and I set it up and I walked away and it got blown over and broke before I even used it for one shot. And, so, Paul C. Buff super cool, great customer service, I sent it in, they repaired it for me for free. Those guys rock. But, this is our basic setup. And, a lot of times, if we go from doing the big team with the Einstein, we will just keep that light source on, but if we're doing where we're shooting one person doing teams, another person doing individuals, even in full sun, those speedlites can provide you enough power, if you know how to use it. If we're going inside, we bring the 5DS, 24-70, 70-200. We bring the Einstein. We bring a huge umbrella. When I'm shooting inside, I bring the biggest friggin' umbrella you've ever seen. I bring every, we bring like 1,000 feet of extension cords because running out of those sucks. And, I'd rather get my recycle time and not have to be dependent upon the Vagabond when I'm shooting, so we bring cords, we'll stretch them out, we'll make it work. Okay? There's a great product out. I don't have it in listed here. We use it a lot for our volume stuff. If you're worried about taping cords down, there's a product called the GaffGun. It's literally, you put a roll of gaffer's tape on, it's got a little handle and you just put it on top of your cord and you go (swish sound) and it's done. It tapes cords down like that. (snaps) So, there's some safety issues of making sure that kids don't trip over it. I don't really worry about that when it's, like, high school kids, cuz they know what's up, like it's not that big of a deal, but when we're doing a huge number of kids, that's what we'll use. So, I used to go and shoot all of these jobs and running stuff in to set up on the volume day was like a real task, it was a real monster. So, what we would do is, like, I'd show up and I'd have to have, you know, 15 light stands. So, I'm literally carrying, like, two light stands in each hand. I'm going upstairs, downstairs, upstairs, downstairs, upstairs, downstairs making all these runs to carry this stuff in. Figured out the best thing in the world you can buy is a golf case. Go on Amazon. We use this, there's two, the Plano Golf Guard Standard Case. It's $50. And I can fit ten light stands in it. So, it's just on wheels, pull that sucker around. It's so easy and it makes our set up, I feel like it looks more professional, instead of making 19 trips to carry gear in. We do it in three. It's just an easier, more professional look. There's also the SKB ARA Double Case. It's like a much more expensive one. It's like $200, $250, but it's a double wide. Check out my double wide. It's a double wide golf case. It's a higher quality one. We use that, as well. So, if you want to get into something that's more affordable, and you're just transporting gear and you're struggling with that, check out a golf case. We also use these big, husky boxes that, it's kind of annoying cuz I buy them from Home Depot and the boxes themselves are probably like $ and then I buy foam from Uline and I spend $200 making them cases for our lights and our cameras. But, we line up a lot of hardware boxes. We just buy rip and tear foam from Uline and we make them work. The foam is way more expensive than the boxes, but you have to buy both. We go then, we would take, we always do a fake floor, so we'll do AstroTurf or dark carpet or something on our volume for the extreme volume jobs. Take all that you put it in. You got all your tripods in another golf bag. You got your lights, your cameras, your transmitters, you got all that stuff and you throw it in the back of your truck.

Class Description

Add thousands of dollars in income to your existing photography business by adding team sports photography. Matthew ‘the Body’ Kemmetmueller runs a profitable volume business and is passionate about sharing his knowledge of the industry secrets with other photographers who want to start a business in this lucrative segment of the photo world.

In this class, Matthew will give you all of the information that you’ll need to start or expand your volume sports photography business. You’ll learn:

  • How to bid on contracts and what your pricing structure should be
  • The best workflow for photographing numerous teams in one day
  • The fastest ways to process orders and keep them organized
  • Lighting and posing for teams and individuals
  • How to use Photoshop to create banners and posters

By the end of this class, you’ll feel confident about entering the profitable volume sports photography business.

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

Fantastic class! Matthew is not only a great teacher who easily gets his ideas and thoughts across but he's fun, funny and engaging. I keep coming back to watch again, and again.

Brian T
 

I've watched Matthew before, on Creative Live, and in person. He never fails to entertain and his knowledge is great. This class on high volume sports photography is the best one I've watched. I'm trying to break into this are of business, and he does a great job of breaking down each area. He is a great public speaker, and does a great job explaining what I need to know.

Isaiah Salazar
 

I cannot full express my gratitude for this class. I have done T & I work before but just little aspects of it have evaded me.this class so far has been extremely helpful and it isn't even over yet. Thank you for not just being open, but being kind. Making it a point to say to "Play by the rules" and to emphasize "Run an ethical business" is refreshing. Don't Be Valdemort! ha ha.