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Getting Started in Concert Photography

Lesson 8 of 8

Final Q&A

 

Getting Started in Concert Photography

Lesson 8 of 8

Final Q&A

 

Lesson Info

Final Q&A

the microphone in front of the singer. How much is too much? How is it okay to have that shot? How do you work around the microphone? I think it's kind of a gut check. Um, we generally like to be about 45 degrees off access from the mike stand. Because you know there's something in front your face. It decreases. The recognizability of the subject decreases the impact. If it's a performer who's singing and you can't see if it's an open out and you can't see their teeth, they can't tell what's going on. It just becomes less of an easy read. So we want to make our subjects as identifiable as possible. We want to make them look the best were out to make compelling, flattering images that the performers would love. Yeah, there's something to be their son to be said about that, because the pictures that we like to shoot that really flatter the artists are not always the ones that are the most rock n roll. And so there were pictures that will create for the sake of being rock n roll, and then...

the client work that we dio where we're really looking for the angles where so and so is gonna look the best where the microphone isn't either obscuring their face or where the microphones, the shadow of the microphone, isn't obscuring their face. That if that makes sense, I think overall, the most separation you can get, either by distance when they're singing or your own position is probably ideal. Awesome. Okay, so many questions. How do you handle a band that has spread out over a wide stage and try to get them all in one shot? That's a great question. You either have a wide angle lens or use them with your feet that is back up. And unfortunately, like sometimes that's it sometimes is actually not possible because you've got the barrier behind you, where you've got the crowd behind you to really get everyone. And I remember we were shooting like the Backstreet Boys just this past weekend. It I heart radio, and I don't have a single photo where I have all of them every single one of their faces visible because there's just too many and the angle live with. That was not good because of the barrier behind me, whereas I was shooting front of house. I got a ball, which is where the like having two photographers, even if you team up with someone unrelated, Teoh wouldn't would be a good idea. But I think, you know, aside from shooting either far back, you know the shoot, Um, from the side of the stage, you kind of get that. And you're not gonna get the same flat, very flattering perspective that you would with a telephoto lens. But you're still going to be able to get that coverage. So either getting either far on the corner or be backing up is probably the best way to do that. All right, we have so many questions coming in for you. We've run out of time. Where can people find you? Follow you. Ask you the question. Find us at tato young dot com Christine dot com on Twitter, instagram, etcetera at that same handle. And our joint website is the bro yung's dot com

Class Description

Concert photography can be one of the hardest fields in photography. As a photographer you have no control over the lighting, environment, or direction of your subject. Learning how to lower the variables so you can capture an amazing moment of a performer or band will drastically improve your chances at growing an amazing portfolio. Todd and Chris Owyoung have photographed some of the biggest names in the music industry. In this class they’ll cover: 

  • How to build your portfolio and get photo passes to concerts 
  • What gear to bring to a performance 
  • Step by step walk through of a live performance and how to deal with the variables within  
In this class the sibling photographic duo will share their expertise of capturing commercial precision and the exhilaration of being in the front row. 

Reviews

CathyCook
 

Excellent class! Holy moly, check out their websites! Lots of good advice, especially for the novice.