Nikon® D500 Fast Start

 

Nikon® D500 Fast Start

 

Lesson Info

Left of Camera: Exposure Bracketing

Did you notice the quality button and the plus/minus button have a little green dot next to them? If you press both of them you can clear all the settings on the camera. There is another option for formatting by pressing the garbage can button and the ISO button. The way that you do this is you simply hold both buttons for three seconds and then you press them again and you can either clear all the settings in the camera or you can reformat the memory card. So be aware of that, for good or for bad reasons. Working our way over to the left side of the camera. Up near the top we have a bracketing button. This is for changing an exposure very quickly and automatedly. If you press the button and turn the back dial you can change the number of shots that you shoot. If you change the front, the increment, or the division between each shot and the next one. So let's take a look at some bracketing. Once again, you've got to hit the bracketing button, turn the back dial, and we can shoot in two...

, three, five, seven, or nine frames. Just as a default, let me just check my camera here. Where's my button. There's a zero F, which can either mean zero frames or off, with only one F. If you want to do bracketing for HDR purposes or you're not sure what the right exposure is, this is a way to shoot photos very, very quickly without manually adjusting the exposure between them. So there's a wide variety of options of how many you're gonna shoot and how far apart they are. Works very quickly and simply for anybody who needs to shoot a bracketed series of photos. This is usually gonna work best when you are shooting from a tripod. You do have an additional option and that is in the drive setting. You can either shoot these in a single mode or maybe you shoot each one with a button press if you're trying to time something particular or if you put it in the continuous mode and you just hold down on it the camera will fire through the sequence and stop at the end of the sequence. So if you have five set it'll shoot through five pictures and then completely stop. Good system to know about. Very helpful in many situations. We can go anywhere from 1/3 of a stop, for a very fine tuned increment to a very large amount, which is a three stop increment. Usually, if I'm not sure about the right exposure, lately my favorite has been five frames one stop apart. Now you can also use this if you want to get even further exposure adjustment, by adding on exposure compensation on top of this. So you could be throwing all of the exposures, underexposed or overexposed, and then bracketing from there. It's about the most versatile system I've seen on any of the camera out on the market. If you want to get into that, you can go into F1 and you can customize that button if you want. If you don't use bracketing, you can customize that to do something else that's more practical for your uses.

Class Description


We know what it’s like to dive right into taking pictures with your new camera. But dense technical manuals make for a terrible first date. Get the most out of your new Nikon® D500 with this complete step-by-step walkthrough of the camera’s features.

Join expert photographer John Greengo for a fast-track introduction, and unlock your camera’s full potential.  In this class you'll learn:


  • How to use the D500’s various shooting modes
  • How to use and customize the D500’s menus
  • How to master the 4K video function
John is a CreativeLive veteran instructor and an experienced photographer. He has extensive experience teaching the technical minutiae that makes any camera an effective tool: aperture, ISO, the Rule of Thirds, and the kinds of lenses you’ll need to suit your camera body. This Fast Start includes a complete breakdown of your camera’s exposure, focus, metering, video and more. John will also explain how to customize the Nikon D500’s settings to work for your style of photography.