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Olympus PEN-F Fast Start

Lesson 25 of 31

Flash/Color/WB Menus

 

Olympus PEN-F Fast Start

Lesson 25 of 31

Flash/Color/WB Menus

 

Lesson Info

Flash/Color/WB Menus

all right. Moved into the flash mode f for controlling the customization of the flash. The 1st 1 is the X Inc. Which means your flash synchronisation, which is the maximum shutter speed your camera will fire out. Now the cameras maximum capability is 1 to 50. So that's probably where you're gonna want to set it. You can adjust it lower if you wanted to. I don't have a lot of good reasons as you why you would want to. But for most people, it's gonna be 2 The slow limit is the slowest shutter that your camera will allow you to use when you're in a mode like program or aperture priority. And this is really going to depend on how steady you think you can hand hold your camera. Ah, basic photographer might say around 1/ of a second. Someone who is very skilled at holding their camera might be down around 1/15 of a second, but it will depend on who you are. What lenses you have and how you like to shoot next up is exposure compensation. Do you want it combined with flash exposure, compensat...

ion or not? For the simple user who just says I want to make it brighter and I want to make it darker. Turn this feature on. And when you adjust the exposure compensation, it'll adjust the standard exposure compensation as well as the power of the flash at the same time. For the more discerning manual photographer you're gonna want to leave. This turned off so that you can have very specific control over the background brightness versus the brightness of the flash. And so make a lot more sense once you start playing around with this one as well. But the more advanced user is definitely gonna want to turn this off from or control, and that's it. And flashed very short menu next up G, which is generally for quality, color and white balance of the image. So we have four different presets that we consent for image quality, and we can go in and choose what we want to see in here with different types of compression as well as different types of file size. Now, normally we're gonna have one have one of these set on large super find quality if we're shooting J pegs. But if we have a variety of different types of J pegs. We can put them into each one of these four different settings and that way on the back of your camera. When you go into set the image quality settings, there's going to be four presets that you can quickly adjust between. And so, if you have, you know, for some purpose you only need small J pegs. You could quickly adjust your camera exactly to the small J peg size that you need or whatever, your four favorite file sizes and file types that you're gonna record in in a particular situation. If you want to go in and shoot with a smaller size pixel count, you can. Most people are gonna want to shoot with the largest size possible, but he wanted issued smaller. It is possible right here, shading composition. This is a darkening of the corners. Let's do a little visual example on this one. And so this image has been getting or a shading issue with the corners because they're a little bit darker, which is something that happens with fast aperture lenses and many lenses opened up wide open. And so the camera will know what type of lenses on it and can automatically fix that and brighten up those corners. Now it can only do this in JPEG images. Can't do this in raw images, but the fact of matter is, is that you don't always want to have this done. I in many cases when I'm doing people photography, like to have a little bit of in getting in there. And so I don't wanna have that camera going in and fixing its Why would leave it disabled in many cases? And so if you want to have it corrected, you can turn it on. But I know there's a lot of more advanced photographers that, like getting that natural look from the lens, whatever that lenses doing, that's what they want on the sensor. Once again, this is Andrzej Pegs. It is not gonna be affected on raw images. We've seen white balance before, but we can also come in here and adjust it. Auto is a good place to start adjust as necessary from there. If you wanted to tweak the white balance, you didn't find that the colors were quite to your liking. You could either adjust all of, um, or you could go in and adjust specific ones if you want. And so I'm hoping you never need to do this. This is something that I doubt that most people will need to go in and need to make any sort of adjustment on. So when you're using the auto white balance, do you want it to absolutely fully correct for the tungsten lights, or do you want it to leave? Just a little bit of that natural warmth of the lights? And I think a lot of people are probably gonna want to leave a little bit of that natural warmth. It's not a lot, but if you do absolutely want to correct for everything, if you're trying to shoot color, correct matching something, you're shooting khaki pants and you gotta have exactly the right color khaki. Then that's something that you would want to turn off. In that case, if you're working in a studio, for instance, when you turn the flash on. If you were to have a flash attached to the camera, do you want the camera to automatically switch to flash white balance? And so, for a basic user, yeah, that might be kind of a nice option but the more advanced user might want is more specifically, choose the way their cameras set up. And so this is only gonna be affected when you have a flash attached to the camera. Next up is the color space, and this is for J. Peg shooters. When you are shooting raw, you get something called Adobe RGB, which is the largest color gamut possible in camera. When you shoot J pegs, you can choose one or the other. And Adobe RGB is a larger gamut, which will give you a little bit more color space in which to print photos. If you're just posting photos on the Internet, it's not gonna make any difference at all. But if you do print photos, it will give you a little bit more access with a little bit more colors that your cameras recording as you're shooting no extra data size. It's all built into the JPEG file

Class Description


We know what it’s like to dive right into taking pictures with your new camera. But dense technical manuals make for a terrible first date. Get the most out of your new Olympus PEN-F with this complete step-by-step walkthrough of the camera’s features.

Join expert photographer John Greengo for a fast-track introduction, and unlock your camera’s full potential.  In this class you'll learn:

  • How to use the electronic viewfinder
  • How to take advantage of the customizable interface
  • How to use the video options
John is a CreativeLive veteran instructor and an experienced photographer. He has extensive experience teaching the technical minutiae that makes any camera an effective tool: aperture, ISO, the Rule of Thirds, and the kinds of lenses you’ll need to suit your camera body. This Fast Start includes a complete breakdown of your camera’s exposure, focus, metering, video and more. John will also explain how to customize the PEN-F’s settings to work for your style of photography.

Reviews

Jay Linsenbigler
 

Awesome course and thorough description of the PEN-F capabilities and functions. HOWEVER, John's "big boy camera" bias comes through when he describes some of the creative functions as "just fun". I highly disagree- because like other tools and features- it depends on HOW the photographer uses the tool or feature. Like HDR, the creative features can be used tastefully or look "overcooked". Film photographers who use a variety of different films in film cameras- is this "just fun", or do they offer creative options? I encourage John and any listeners to look up the Olympus Visionaries and many other professionals using Olympus cameras in their daily work to see the amazing results they create with them. Instead of the same old Nikon and Canon "muscle-flexing" biases- lets look at what the pros produce with the camera tools. All modern cameras are superb and capable of great results. And this PEN-F camera offers groundbreaking control over the image making IN CAMERA at the time of exposure- which can be used to adjust an accompanying RAW file if needed. Not everyone wants to sit in front of a computer for hours doing post processing.

Jay Linsenbigler
 

Awesome course and thorough description of the PEN-F capabilities and functions. HOWEVER, John's "big boy camera" bias comes through when he describes some of the creative functions as "just fun". I highly disagree- because like other tools and features- it depends on HOW the photographer uses the tool or feature. Like HDR, the creative features can be used tastefully or look "overcooked". Film photographers who use a variety of different films in film cameras- is this "just fun", or do they offer creative options? I encourage John and any listeners to look up the Olympus Visionaries and many other professionals using Olympus cameras in their daily work to see the amazing results they create with them. Instead of the same old Nikon and Canon "muscle-flexing" biases- lets look at what the pros produce with the camera tools. All modern cameras are superb and capable of great results. And this PEN-F camera offers groundbreaking control over the image making IN CAMERA at the time of exposure- which can be used to adjust an accompanying RAW file if needed. Not everyone wants to sit in front of a computer for hours doing post processing.

Kate Mooney
 

The Pen 5 is an amazing camera - however it is capable of so much that getting to know it can be somewhat overwhelming at first. John systematically and logically works through every part of the camera in really clear and easy to understand steps, quickly converting my initial apprehension into confidence and excitement for the endless possibilities of this camera.