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Olympus PEN-F Fast Start

Lesson 22 of 31

Release Menu

 

Olympus PEN-F Fast Start

Lesson 22 of 31

Release Menu

 

Lesson Info

Release Menu

all right, moving on to Group C, which deals with the release of the camera. So when the camera is in the single autofocus, do you wanna have the cameras on a release priority or a shutter priority? And in this case, it is on a focused Excuse me, a focus priority so that the camera has to be in focus to take a photo. And so if you put it, if you turn this on, you would be able to shoot out of focus photos. And this is something that most people kind of want to be slightly guarded against. And so I would leave this one turned off. The next one is when you were in the continuous autofocus ing mode. Do you want to be able to take out of focus photos so that you can get photos right when you press the shutter release? And there are some sports photographers who would prefer to turn this on because the focus is close enough and it's more important that they get the action it. But for most users, I'm gonna recommend leaving. This turned off so that the camera really tries hard to get things ...

in focus before it allows you to shoot the photo. We can then go in and control the low frames per second. So in the motor drive mode, you can choose high or low and low will be anywhere from 1 to 5 frames per second. If you choose the high fright frames per second, you'll be able to adjust that anywhere from 5 to frames per second, so it can fire very, very quickly for fast moving action. Now, we do also have the heart mode which remember, is the silent mode. And so this is where it uses the Elektronik shutter curtain. And so it's gonna make very little noise. And if you want, you can control the frame rate in both low and the high speed frames. And here you can actually get it squeezed all the way up to 11 frames per second. But be reminded it doesn't work well with fast action because of the rolling shutter effect on. So you have to be very careful about subjects that are moving back and forth. The image stabilizer mode, which we saw before in the Super Control panel, has another control. Here s I s one is your standard stabilization mode that most people are gonna wanna have it in. There is a movie mode that you can get into here, and so in em. One. Let's see, M one is a sensor shift and digital, which means it crops in on the frame and it digitally stabilizes your image. This is good for getting a very stable image, but it's bad because you lose wide angle capability and you're not using as much of your sensor. And so I think the more serious user is gonna use em. I s too, which is Onley using the censorship technology so that it's not changing the image quality as faras the resolution and the size of the sensor that you're using. So you're going to get all the white angle capabilities. Somebody who's using this in a more casual manner that just wants a steady shot would probably choose the M. I s one option, huh? All right, then we have our standards stabilization, whether you have it turned on or off. Not so much, which one you're using. And if you do have this turn on, it's possible that it may limit the speed at which you can shoot fast motor drive shots, but I think it's well worth it. If you're gonna hand hold your camera lot, I think it's probably worth it just to leave it on all the time. It doesn't use too much battery power. One of the options with the stabilization is whether you want to see that effect when you are pressing halfway down on the shutter release. In general, I like it because it helps stabilize the frame and I can compose a little bit more easily. But if you don't like it because it's hard to track the action, you can turn it off so that it only stabilizes during the actual exposure of the photograph. If you have a lens that has stabilization built into it, there's a number of Panasonic lenses, and I think of the office lenses. Most of the Olympus is have stabilization in the body, and so it's the Panasonic lenses that you're likely to find that might have a stabilization built into it. In generally lens, stabilization in the lends itself is superior to in the camera body because they're able to get the motors and the function really Taylor to that specific lens. And so I would leave. This turned on so that if you do start, turn on, put on a lens that has stabilization, it's going to use the best system available, which is the one in the lends itself. There is a option on release time lag, and surprisingly, my recommendation is to leave it on normal, not short. The reason that I would say this is that if you leave it on normal, it is consistent with all shutter speeds that you use. If you put it on short, it will fluctuate depending on this length of the shutter speed that you've chosen. And so it is a very, very slim disk difference between normal and short. You can try it yourself and see if you notice a difference, but there is a very, very slight difference between them.

Class Description


We know what it’s like to dive right into taking pictures with your new camera. But dense technical manuals make for a terrible first date. Get the most out of your new Olympus PEN-F with this complete step-by-step walkthrough of the camera’s features.

Join expert photographer John Greengo for a fast-track introduction, and unlock your camera’s full potential.  In this class you'll learn:

  • How to use the electronic viewfinder
  • How to take advantage of the customizable interface
  • How to use the video options
John is a CreativeLive veteran instructor and an experienced photographer. He has extensive experience teaching the technical minutiae that makes any camera an effective tool: aperture, ISO, the Rule of Thirds, and the kinds of lenses you’ll need to suit your camera body. This Fast Start includes a complete breakdown of your camera’s exposure, focus, metering, video and more. John will also explain how to customize the PEN-F’s settings to work for your style of photography.

Reviews

Jay Linsenbigler
 

Awesome course and thorough description of the PEN-F capabilities and functions. HOWEVER, John's "big boy camera" bias comes through when he describes some of the creative functions as "just fun". I highly disagree- because like other tools and features- it depends on HOW the photographer uses the tool or feature. Like HDR, the creative features can be used tastefully or look "overcooked". Film photographers who use a variety of different films in film cameras- is this "just fun", or do they offer creative options? I encourage John and any listeners to look up the Olympus Visionaries and many other professionals using Olympus cameras in their daily work to see the amazing results they create with them. Instead of the same old Nikon and Canon "muscle-flexing" biases- lets look at what the pros produce with the camera tools. All modern cameras are superb and capable of great results. And this PEN-F camera offers groundbreaking control over the image making IN CAMERA at the time of exposure- which can be used to adjust an accompanying RAW file if needed. Not everyone wants to sit in front of a computer for hours doing post processing.

Jay Linsenbigler
 

Awesome course and thorough description of the PEN-F capabilities and functions. HOWEVER, John's "big boy camera" bias comes through when he describes some of the creative functions as "just fun". I highly disagree- because like other tools and features- it depends on HOW the photographer uses the tool or feature. Like HDR, the creative features can be used tastefully or look "overcooked". Film photographers who use a variety of different films in film cameras- is this "just fun", or do they offer creative options? I encourage John and any listeners to look up the Olympus Visionaries and many other professionals using Olympus cameras in their daily work to see the amazing results they create with them. Instead of the same old Nikon and Canon "muscle-flexing" biases- lets look at what the pros produce with the camera tools. All modern cameras are superb and capable of great results. And this PEN-F camera offers groundbreaking control over the image making IN CAMERA at the time of exposure- which can be used to adjust an accompanying RAW file if needed. Not everyone wants to sit in front of a computer for hours doing post processing.

Kate Mooney
 

The Pen 5 is an amazing camera - however it is capable of so much that getting to know it can be somewhat overwhelming at first. John systematically and logically works through every part of the camera in really clear and easy to understand steps, quickly converting my initial apprehension into confidence and excitement for the endless possibilities of this camera.