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Retouching & Adobe Photoshop Techniques

Lesson 21 of 28

Creative Skin Effects

 

Retouching & Adobe Photoshop Techniques

Lesson 21 of 28

Creative Skin Effects

 

Lesson Info

Creative Skin Effects

00:00:02.11 --> 00:00:04. so I'm gonna bounce around with lots of miscellaneous 00:00:04.57 --> 00:00:07. cool techniques. So you guys stop me if you have any 00:00:07.23 --> 00:00:10. questions. Um, yesterday, based on the questions that 00:00:10.98 --> 00:00:13. I had received from different people, I picked a couple 00:00:13.58 --> 00:00:16. photos from kind of my archive to answer some of these 00:00:16.88 --> 00:00:19. questions. Um, the first thing that I did want to 00:00:19.6 --> 00:00:23. start with Oh, is really cool and fun and funky, and 00:00:23.26 --> 00:00:25. we're gonna pick an image from an editorial I shot 00:00:25.38 --> 00:00:25. recently 00:00:27.38 --> 00:00:30. and let's see. Okay, So here's the raw image. 00:00:31.74 --> 00:00:34. I am not offended. How many people think that this 00:00:34.33 --> 00:00:38. is a good photo, as is 00:00:39.84 --> 00:00:42. probably not, right? I mean, it's not really lit that 00:00:42.59 --> 00:00:46. well, and her face looks kin...

d of greasy, and it's, 00:00:46.37 --> 00:00:50. I mean, it's not a great photo is a stand alone because 00:00:50.1 --> 00:00:53. it wasn't shot to look like this. It was shot for 00:00:53.94 --> 00:00:56. an effect that I'm going to do in post some issue 00:00:56.79 --> 00:01:00. a little bit of how I would tweak this. All right, 00:01:00.62 --> 00:01:04. so I'm going to convert her to gray scale or two black 00:01:04.49 --> 00:01:07. and white. All right, so I'm thinking that I need 00:01:07.95 --> 00:01:09. to play with something that's going to be really, 00:01:09.81 --> 00:01:14. really high contrast How I let her was I put kind 00:01:14.06 --> 00:01:18. of highlights on her face. I put just vasselin If 00:01:18.23 --> 00:01:21. you look at my my website portfolio, you'll see more 00:01:21.66 --> 00:01:25. extreme examples of this. The ones that show it best 00:01:25.12 --> 00:01:27. are all nude and I wasn't allowed to use them. So 00:01:27.9 --> 00:01:30. if you want to see what they look like, you can see 00:01:30.01 --> 00:01:32. some of those shots up on my site. 00:01:33.13 --> 00:01:35. All right, so I'm looking here, and I know that I 00:01:35.78 --> 00:01:38. want major contrast because I want the highlights 00:01:38.14 --> 00:01:41. in this headpiece to pop and then also the detail 00:01:41.26 --> 00:01:44. in the jewelry so I could do this either in a tone 00:01:44.3 --> 00:01:46. curve which is here. And right now I'm just an adobe 00:01:46.56 --> 00:01:49. camera raw, or I could do it right in, you know, my 00:01:49.45 --> 00:01:52. normal adjustments. So I pop up my exposure 00:01:53.23 --> 00:01:54. and dragged down by blacks. 00:01:55.74 --> 00:01:57. You know, I'm starting to get something a little more 00:01:57.79 --> 00:01:59. dramatic. I can pump up my highlights. 00:02:01.1 --> 00:02:04. Come pump up my whites. So what I'm doing is I'm reducing 00:02:04.19 --> 00:02:06. the image basically to just highlights and shadows. 00:02:08.19 --> 00:02:10. Another thing that I want to do is okay. I really 00:02:10.39 --> 00:02:13. want her arm to be darker. I just really want you 00:02:13.27 --> 00:02:15. to see the highlights kind of her profile, the shape 00:02:15.62 --> 00:02:19. of her body, and that's about it. So if I flip over 00:02:20.36 --> 00:02:23. to gray scale again, remember how I said originally, 00:02:23.86 --> 00:02:27. you can change how each color is converted into black 00:02:27.18 --> 00:02:29. and white. So if you have a light blue sky wins converted 00:02:29.15 --> 00:02:31. to black and white, you can drag the blue. So left 00:02:31.51 --> 00:02:34. it would become a dark blue sky. Well, in this example, 00:02:34.66 --> 00:02:39. I know that skin tones are made up of yellow, orange 00:02:39.73 --> 00:02:43. and red. So if I drag skin tones so left 00:02:45.03 --> 00:02:49. dragged the reds the left, we'll get the totally different 00:02:49.22 --> 00:02:51. image going a totally different direction that I'm 00:02:51.34 --> 00:02:53. coming away with. And I need to crap away that top 00:02:54.36 --> 00:02:57. because it's not what I'm looking for. His crop that 00:02:57.78 --> 00:03:01. away. And so what I did for this entire editorial 00:03:01.54 --> 00:03:05. was more or less ah, version of this. Something with 00:03:05.85 --> 00:03:09. really, really, really dark skin, bright highlights 00:03:09.46 --> 00:03:11. on the skin and then jewelry popping. It's if you 00:03:11.87 --> 00:03:14. want to set a better example again, check out my sight. 00:03:14.42 --> 00:03:17. But I knew when I was shooting it how it was going 00:03:17.43 --> 00:03:21. to play in post, and this took me about four shoots 00:03:21.73 --> 00:03:25. to figure out how to d'oh. I did tests of people off 00:03:25.19 --> 00:03:28. of model mayhem. I did test with agency models to 00:03:28.36 --> 00:03:30. figure out how you need the light. And when you look 00:03:30.57 --> 00:03:32. at the other examples, what you'll see is when their 00:03:32.56 --> 00:03:36. bodies covered in gels, usually hassling you, get 00:03:36.71 --> 00:03:39. long, beautiful highlights. So even though they're 00:03:39.38 --> 00:03:42. in silhouette, you still get a idea of the shape and 00:03:42.1 --> 00:03:44. form based on those highlights. And then the jewelry 00:03:44.55 --> 00:03:47. pops out because it's she's led by two soft boxes, 00:03:47.64 --> 00:03:50. and so the jewelry is illuminated. So this is doing 00:03:50.89 --> 00:03:54. an entire shoot completely based off of how it's going 00:03:54.24 --> 00:03:57. to be finished up in post. And I did a few more things. 00:03:57.35 --> 00:03:59. Where did another conversion, where I brought out 00:03:59.29 --> 00:04:01. some of the hair in the vest that she had there, but it makes for a very interesting kind of high patent, high impact image, as you can see in this example something like that. So that's how it plays a role in my oven guard fashion photography and this This image hasn't entered Photoshopped yet 100% in camera raw, and it already looks like it's had a lot of retouching done to it. Okay, so I'm gonna do another example. A couple other things that I wanted to demo. All right, so another editorial that I did recently, and I just I just thought this would be a good way to break up the intense compositing and do some fun. Other examples? All right, so looking at this photo, looking at her face, you know that it needs retouching, and it doesn't look necessarily high fashion enough yet. And if you're going to go funky with the gel and cool jewelry and weird hair, um, and maybe the lighting or the retouching could take it another step in that direction. So the theme for the shoe was futuristic and some thinking, how can I make this look futuristic? And what I can do is I could make her kind of like a cyborg. So we're gonna play with that real quick, and we shoot most of what I can do. I can do right here in camera, raw, and then do a few tweaks over in photo shop. So going back to the same thing at the time and time again. People want to know how I get that pale skin effect. If I go to my saturation, it's over in the hue saturation, luminous channel on this adobe Kamerad and light room, it's you go down. It's where you change things. The black and whites, one of the panels. She switched hue, saturation, lieutenants, then quick on saturation. And I can pull out kind of the oranges, reds and yellows. But if you look at her face here now, it's really kind of dark and grey. So that's when I could go. Instead of saturation, I can go toe luminous, which means I can go back to those reds, yellows and oranges and make them brighter so I can go ahead and brighten up the reds, yellows and oranges so kind of flipping on and off. You're starting to look a little bit more like a cyborg, right? A little more, uh, smooth skin. I know that I want to increase. My whites want that's cool, but it kind of really pretty shiny. So if you have C s six, you'll be familiar with these changes. Have exposure, contrast and then the new things are now, Instead of having fill light and recovery, you now have highlights and shadows and whites that you can play with. It's gonna pump up my highlights a little bit, maybe to their only See what your screen looks like. It was something like that. So right now everything I've done in camera robbed at a little bit of clarity don't go back to the very original, the very original. She had that kind of red skin. So I've made a really, really big difference so far. What's cool is well, I know that I have that purple I had Ah, how it's lit was a beauty dish to this sign and then a silver reflector with, um, a pink and purple gel on the other side. So if I want to change that pink and purple gel, I can go back to Hugh in the hue, saturation ruminants and change the color. So I went down to my purples and I could make it pink if I want or I can make it more blue or whatever I feel is appropriate. Space him back. I'm gonna click Okay, click open and let me just show you again. What the original started as so If you're looking at the original, you know, it's much more of a fashion retouch. And everything has just been how a post process, that pulling out color of the skin, brightening up the highlights. Maybe if I were doing a portrait, I don't want to blow out the highlights. I don't want the skin to to go to light. It's not a portrait. I could do that. So it's a very different approach. If you download the checklist that I have, it is very different. If I do often guard it, What am I trying to say? What am I communicating from communicating? It's that she's a cyborg. I want no color and no skin detail, so it's completely different than if I'm doing a portrait. So if I come in here and zoom in, I just duplicated my background there and zoom into her face. No, normally you say Okay, you want to keep the skin detail. I don't really need to keep much in detail, so I want it to be perfect, so I will grab my spot healing rush and kind of clean everything up here. Not too much blemishes to get rid of. I can grab my clone stamp on lighten and maybe kind of light enough, this texture. But this is when I grab my portraiture and I overuse it on purpose. Okay? And we tried to do this a little bit yesterday, so we're goingto grab it again. And so notice just cleaning up on portraiture are on. Ah, clone stamp with Leighton. So if I duplicate my layer, go to filter image gnomic portraiture except and I zoom in now if I zoom win and I select her skin nothing happens because when you have your mask on portraiture is looking for skin tones. This is not a skin tone. So if you go, you guys go ahead and you're like, Oh, I want to try Lindsay's skin smoothing technique and you pull out the color before you retouch it. You'll have a problem with portraiture. It it doesn't know how to grab that color. So you have to actually turn your color selection off and to see now if you turn it kind of a foreign after it's working. So I want a little bit of fine detail, something like that gonna hit Okay, I'm going to put a mask on this, and I can paint back in that really perfectly smooth cyborg skin. And I'm just painting with white, painting it back in, campaigning on the hands. And so if you see the difference between this and the original, this face and this skin looks much more like a fashion magazine versus Let me just quickly open up the other shot before the retouching so I can put them side by side open. And I was going to drag this as a bottom layer so you guys can see before and after this. Okay? All right. So if you want to see before and after here, you know, it makes a drastic difference. Wouldn't be appropriate for a portrait, but it is for fashion. So I want to make sure included that to address that question. One of the easy ways to make a photo look more fashion than otherwise is to decrease vibrance and increase contrast. Pale skin and kind of porcelain with very little vibrance in the shot is very common in vogue. And if you go ahead and you look at an Annie Liebowitz shop, well, Hollywood's foot on how it's been retouched if you look. The colors often aren't saturated, they're much more muted. But they had to be had. Increase the contrast. So there is still a black point, so it didn't look mute. Look muddied. So it's decreased. Vibrance increase contrast. And then she often does a little bit of split toning. So she's adding some kind of warmer Hughes into the shadows of her photographs. And there's this other retouching things she does as well but kind of fashion retouching, a question from Via Rela. And I think we saw this yesterday, too. But could you just Are there any other things that make a retouch a fashion versus a classic regular portrait? Retouch So, which is a fashion retouch? Make it a fashion retouch instead of a regular portrait? Rita. So for fashion he touches. You're getting rid of any blemishes or anything that identifies that person as an individual. If that makes sense of moles or scars or really anything, unless you're photographing a supermodel where you still want to keep whatever they're identifying features or a celebrity. But for portrait or for ah ah, non portrait fashion, then you want to perfect the skin. If it's Caucasian skin, you usually want it to be less saturated. Um, it totally depends on the photographer and on the shoot. But if you look through a lot of magazines, you seldom have. I mean, I don't think in any fashion shoots I can think of in most of magazines that I publish in that it's the true skin tone. It's either darker lit with a gel. It's lighter toned. It's lower contrast. It's higher contrast. There's never any that look like a well lit, correctly color balanced portrait ever. I mean, if you look through and the reason is for fashion is that what we're doing is we're fighting for eyes. What were your flipping through a magazine? There are hundreds and thousands of images that people are seeing every day, So if I go ahead and do a traditionally lip portrait with traditional retouching, it blends into the background. You've seen it 1,000,000 times before, so we're all fighting for you guys to stop and take a look and pay attention. Now, of course, since I'm describing fashion is having a specific look, then you're also falling into the trap of looking like all the other fashion images. But at least you're saying, Well, I'm in this realm of fashions. You recognize what's trying to be achieved, So I guess that might answer aging forest question, he says. In what situations would you over process images for a fashion that I interpret that mean almost always over processing? It depends on your style, but I'm thinking most of the kind of creative fashion magazine issue for its never correct retouching. There's some beauty shoots that air the makeup. Maybe it's just really off guard, and the skin is more correctly processed. But even then, if it's if it's Caucasian skin, they pulled out some of the the color, and they over retouched it so usually, And one other thing I would do to this image as well. A zay would liquefy it. Just, you know, I would pull in her waist here just a little bit, and it also probably pull out the side of the skirt. And I'd retouch out this leg because it's distracting me. I'd probably clone up Thea the Garter, the side a little bit, her ears. Okay, it's bordering on word. Shrink it because much you know it's bordering on where I might need to tuck it in just a little. Um, I could give her more to find jawline if I wanted something like that. And I think in the actual retouch, I made her hair bigger, so fun after something like that. I love watching you work, Lindsay. Thank you. We do have a couple of questions on black and white conversions, if that's all right. Yeah, actually, one was from Doug Be photo. Who said was referring actually to the end of the day yesterday. Andi says you're talking about adjusting the channels and converting gray scale. Does that option disappear when shooting monochrome in camera like you did yesterday? So splitting out RGB is that Does that disappear? If you shot monochrome and not in raw, you shot a J peg monochrome. You don't have the ability to convert after the fact using, you know we can change the Reds and because you threw out the color information so I never, ever shoot in black and white where it's a JPEG image. But actually, sometimes I will put the back of my camera into monochromatic mode when I'm shooting raw because how I shoot does change, for if I'm shooting black and white to color, it doesn't change with its I'm photographing more about the composition or about the impact, or about the highlights and shadows. Where is colored? Something totally different. So shoot raw and you have no problem, right? So essentially you're just seeing it. It's like the good old days where you would think differently when you're shooting in back exactly this color, because actually looking for different things. So, no, thank you. Um, Beauty The lake from St Pete, Florida Just to clarify, do you need to start with a color image and then convert to black and white? How else would you know what the skin tones are? Orange, yellow, etcetera. I mean, skin tones are always something red, orange and yellow. I mean, no matter what, like what race, what nationality? Where those colors are in there, it just depending on what race and nationality are. It's a different combination of those those colors in those tones and also depends on what light you were photographed under, because if it were photographed under a blue light in the blue gel, then it's going to kind of change. What you're going to need Thio be modifying so But yet you have to start with the color image You've gone over and just touch quickly on place. And so does the copy, verse and copy and cut and paste versus placement. Is that his place Improved the quality or better quality Or is there reason? Okay, good thing for places. Kind of like how you have with a smart object, right? When you change the size of something, you can always go back. How it works is if you go ahead and cut and paste into your composite and you shrink him down. You've thrown out that information from when when the person was larger, you shrunk him down. If you try to make a bigger again like you changed your mind, you don't have that information access when you place it you're pulling from, say, a 60 megabyte tiff or something else. So you have all that information to work with and then you can constantly update so placing. I mean, I could just do real quick what placing looks like, um, I don't know if you were, they can't tell the difference, but basically, I'm gonna hide the mic we have here. All right, let's minimize this. Okay, Someone hide, Mike. And now I'm going to go ahead and do file place. And I believe I saved two on my desktop. There's Mike over here. Gonna place him. All right, so hit. Enter. So now he is placed there. But before, if I wanted to make changes, I have to do it right on the cotton paste. However, now, if I go ahead, grab the psd of Mike and let's say that I do a hue saturation, and I changed. I don't know. It's trying to mess with something that you'll notice. Okay, let's say that I, like, make him greenish. Whatever. I closed that and save it. Should click. I have to You have to update it. Okay, So what I did is if you click here, I don't think I actually saved that. So that would make sense. Why? It's an update. Um, if you double click, see where it says where you see him, then it has, like, this little edit option, because I placed it on a double click on that. Okay, it opens up that original file. No, let's colorize them or something. all right, and I'm gonna click this. Save it. Hey, it was even makes a difference. Um, and so it did actually colorize him. And so it changed everything. So it's one of those things that I want to go back and change it. I can go ahead, double click it, opens it back up. I can turn it off, take him back to his original. I can liquefy in. You know, maybe I wanted to change and liquefy his shoulders instead of having to do that from the other image. Where? Let's say, maybe I needed to duplicate and liquefy and cut things together. I can do it, you know, kind of here hit, okay. And we'll update. Yes. Something a few folks are asking if you use smart objects. Um, so smart objects I tend not to use because I do a lot of changes that are destructive, no matter what I'd want. Like after I applied the changes, I'm retouching. I'm cloning out the skin. So the smart object isn't going to help me because I actually modified the pixels. So for this type of stuff, it's not super helpful. Um, sometimes the reason that I view smart objects is Is anyone here ever double process an image? So maybe the background. You opened up the raw once because you wanted the background to be darker. So you opened up that image underexposed. And then with a smart object, you opened up again in that same file. But you did one brighter, and you can kind of combine the two. So I've opened it up that way because then I could make the little tweaks and doom I'm asking. So okay, wanted background to go to a little darker. And I can go back to the original object, darken it down that foreground. It needs to go lighter. I could go back to the smart object, lighting it up, and then eventually can compress the two. So from my workflow, not usually unless I'm double double processing an image

Class Description


Learn in-depth techniques for retouching images to perfection, helping your clients look their best, and expressing your creative vision! Whether retouching skin, whitening teeth or reshaping body features, Adobe® Photoshop® allows you to perfect reality as well as express your creative vision. In this workshop portrait and fashion photographer, Lindsay Adler will cover essential retouching techniques and teach how Adobe Photoshop allows you to make the impossible possible! Lindsay will cover countless creative Adobe Photoshop techniques: creating porcelain skin, changing colors, displacement maps, adding textures, adding makeup in Adobe Photoshop, quick retouching plugins, and dozens of other techniques you can apply to your own photography.

Let Adobe Photoshop become your next realm of creative expression through this workshop. Lindsay will also include a couple live shoots and live retouches so you can see an image start to finish and learn the nuances between a portrait, beauty or avant-garde retouch.


SOFTWARE USED: 

Adobe Photoshop CS6

Reviews

Sean
 

Fantastic Photoshop course. I knew Lindsay was great at Photography, Lighting, Posing and Public Speaking, but I am really blown away by her mad (great) skills at Photoshop. Lindsay really is a fantastic teacher. She turns what might be a more or less dry topic into a fun and entertaining topic. Thank you Lindsay and thank you CreativeLIve. You have a real superstar with Lindsay Adler.

a Creativelive Student
 

This is a great workshop for photographers wanting to learn and hone in on their retouching skills. As a photoshop user and photographer of 10 yrs I have been able to take away some further techniques to help better my skills and more or less tailor them. I would suggest you have some adv beginner knowledge of photoshop because I don't think some of the techniques you will be able to keep up with unless you buy it. There are two things that I wish she did better in her teaching and that is to teach new users to label all their layers and what they are as you are working. As you can see Lindsay ends up with 20 layers and unless your the one doing the editing you will have know idea what is what when you have to go back to it. So its best to teach this in the beginning so people get into the habit of organization early. Also I wish she used a Wacom. It really does cut your editing time in half and you have more solid movements in precisely selecting areas of a photo. From a photographer to other photographers. Use a wacom. You can start with a basic baboo for $89 and when the apple wireless mouse cost $69. Time is money, and a wacom truely save time! I used to use a mouse and my trackpad and once I switched I was like OMG what was I thinking before! So I wish she just emphasized that point more. Overall I think it was $99 well spent.

Christian G.
 

Not only is Lindsay very knowledgeable and a very good teacher but I REALLY TRULY appreciate her no-BS, straight-forward style.. No time wasted on long tangents talking about herself (or what have you), on cute remarks or on off-the-mark humor. She has showed us many great techniques, has presented to us various creative/different ideas AND she has also really been able to explain "how she thinks of a solution", how there is a bit of trial and error, "even" at her level.. All in a all, a truly excellent course and worth every penny!! Thank you Lindsay and thank you to the CreativeLive team for a great course!!