The Gear: What are Flags, C-Stands, & Dollies

 

Shooting The Scene

 

Lesson Info

The Gear: What are Flags, C-Stands, & Dollies

We've got this camera set up we've got a tripod head some legs and then you know, for our our day exterior chute I also brought some lighting and grip equipment and we've got our gaffer russ over here and, um for since that we're out in the daylight it's very bright and we're kind of on a low budget shoot way were also on a roof where it's fairly inaccessible we didn't I didn't think we could bring any big h im eyes up here to shoot with and which is probably it'll probably look better without that anyway, we don't want to overfill we don't want to over light and we'll be ableto move faster yes jim my oh sorry demise it's you know I used to know what those letters stand for, but it's it's basically it's a very bright arclight that's daylight color temperature so and it's kind of the standard thiss standard movie light for shooting day light balance the biggest ones are eighteen thousand watts eighteen k and they go down to two hundred watts, which is, you know, their little jokers or a...

reas there's actually one hundred twenty five watt so the small ones you can plug in the wall and you still get a lot of light out of them and big ones of course take generators and massive cables and three guys to move around so but we don't have any of those here wasn't in the budget and that's okay because waken do it without so what we have for lighting control in this is we've got some four by four frame's um based on the scout this is a four by four floppy flag and this is a four by four floppy muslim and so we've got white and black and the you know, the the thing that you can do with these is you can you can either add light or take it away and they're very simple their light weight we can handle you know the small crew can handle it and that's what we've got here we've got some c stands century stands and the's air kind of the standard standard piece of equipment that you used for holding these flags in place when you when you want hold them and we know from from doing our prep in the previous class that we wanted to do some dolly moves for this so we brought a skateboard dolly where is that right now? Okay, would you mind going to get that and he's going to grab that you just made mention to your other workshop which is the cinematographer prepares and so jim here accretive live was here yesterday filming a workshop separate from this workshop but they really go hand in hand on in that workshop we kind of we set up for this day shooting the scene we did a full day's of setting up which is typical in the industry on dh then today we're giving you guys this workshop as to shooting the scene all this equipment that we're looking at is actually in a pdf that were providing absolutely freed you guys there's a full equipment list for everything that we're using today there's a feature film equipment list we have the script for this shoot today so you can follow along and lots of other goodies so I'll let you continue ok cool so we knew we wanted to do some camera movement for this so we brought a dolly now there you know there are many different kinds of the most complicated ones they're they're heavy they wave for five hundred pounds they have a hydraulic arm that makes the camera go up and down the mass actually makes it easier for the dollar grip to move it smoothly but that is not in our budget either what we have and what you know what ah lot of indie movies will have is escape for dolly and that is it can be moved easily up and down stairs to get to our roof duck here and it's basically a piece of plywood with you know with some way of attaching wheels to the bottom of it they're different different variations on this theme but in this case they've just made a couple of little blocks and then these air some standard you channel escape more skateboard wheels there you get these in different sizes and different configurations there's also much simpler trucks just have four skateboard wheels that will ride on the track and so this is something you know, if you want to know if you're working on your indie movie like and I a lot of the movies that I started out shooting this is what we had and it works great. The limitations are mostly that you I have no way of going up and down that but a small jib arm khun solved that problem for you, so we've got the skateboard trucks and then you need to have a way to make it roll the system to make it roll. So we use track um you can rent this or another simple solution is you can use pvc pipes and and, you know, two by fours as cross pieces with little not just carved out of it and make your own truck so that that is what sorry that's all the dollar groups that I know just laughed at me. So that's, this is our basic equipment package. We also have a few sandbags here, which are important for stopping things from blowing away when you need to anchor stuff down and at a certain point we're going to get the camera kind of leaning out a little bit where we use them to counterbalance that. And so this is our equipment package.

Class Description

There is no greater filmmaking challenge than translating one’s cinematic vision into a practical shooting plan that produces edit-able footage. In Shooting The Scene, renowned cinematographer Jim Denault, ASC teaches you how to take a production plan and shoot efficiently, economically, and artistically.

Jim’s award-winning work includes The Campaign, Boys Don't Cry, and Game Change. In this class, he’ll share insights from his experience shooting both indie and studio films and teach you how to translate your vision into a series of filmed units (aka “coverage”). You’ll learn how to:

  • Set the aesthetic and technical approaches for each shot
  • Determine how many shots you’ll need within a scene
  • Balance practical limitations and still acquire what's best for the scene

Shooting The Scene will help all cinematographers, camera operators, and filmmakers develop a more systematic approach to planning a shoot. You’ll become more equipped to take an idea that only lives in your mind and turn it into an actionable shooting plan.


Reviews

Kevin Baggott
 

I had worked briefly many years ago on a shoot that jim was the DP for. I was very impressed with how he ran the set. It was a great pleasure to watch this course. Learnt many things. I would highly recommend it.