Skip to main content

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

Lesson 31 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

Lesson 31 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

31. Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1 Introduction

1

Welcome to the Class

02:12
2

What Makes a Great Video

03:17
3

What Type of Video Should You Make

02:47

Chapter 2: Pre-production

4

Come up with a Great Video Ideas

05:05
5

Plan Your Video

03:30
6

The Pre-production Checklist

04:04

Chapter 3 Equipment - Our Suggestions for Getting Started

7

Does Equipment Matter

01:34
8

Our Recommended Cameras

06:00
9

Our Recommended Audio Equipment

04:37
10

Our Recommended Lighting Equipment

01:47
11

Our Recommended Editing Equipment

02:11
12

Our Recommended Drone Equipment

05:35
13

Quiz: Chapter 3

Chapter 4:Cinematography Basics

14

Exposing Your Shots

05:25
15

Compose Your Shots

04:25
16

Filming Yourself

01:09
17

Getting the Right Shot

03:43
18

Choose a Background

02:32
19

My Office Video Setup

02:54
20

Quiz: Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Tips for Shooting with Different Cameras

21

Exposing with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

06:31
22

Focus with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

02:35
23

Stabilize Your Shots

02:57
24

Know Your Lenses

03:18
25

Shoot with Your Smartphone

05:10
26

Shoot with Your Webcam

05:49
27

Record Great Screencast Videos

04:20
28

Tips for Better Drone Shots

04:06
29

Types of Drone Shots

01:43
30

Quiz: Chapter 5

Chapter 6: Audio Recording and Microphones

31

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

03:14
32

Record Better Audio in Any Environment

01:27
33

How to Use a Lavalier Microphone

02:47
34

How to Use a Shotgun Microphone

00:55
35

How to Record Audio with Your Computer

01:27
36

Quiz: Chapter 6

Chapter 7: Video Lighting

37

Why We Light

01:03
38

Use Natural Light

04:14
39

The 3-point Video Lighting Setup

07:26
40

Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Editing Better Videos

41

Intro to Editing

02:15
42

The Post-production Process

07:50
43

Craft a Story with Editing

05:21
44

Improve Your Audio with Editing

06:34
45

Find and Add Music

05:12
46

Design Clean and Professional Titles

03:15
47

Increase Video Engagement with Calls to Action

01:29
48

Quiz: Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Get More Views - Publishing Your Video Online

49

Export the Best Quality Video for Online

02:54
50

Tips for Posting Online

05:28
51

Grow Your Youtube Channel

04:41
52

Quiz: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Case Studies: Real-world Filmmaking

53

Case Study - Corporate Promo Videos with Ghirardelli Chocolate

08:54
54

Case Study - Event Videography with Major Lazer

08:39
55

Case Study - Documentary Films with Phil

14:24
56

Case Study - Shooting By Yourself

15:32
57

Case Study - Wedding Videography

08:37
58

Case Study - Phil's Livestream Setup

04:23

Chapter 11: Conclusion

59

Thank You

00:59

Final Quiz

60

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

Hey everyone. Welcome to a new section in the course. This section is all about audio, choosing the right microphone and how to use that microphone for your shoot first. Remember what our microphone options are. We have lava lair microphones, shotgun microphones onboard, shotgun microphones, internal microphones or studio or USB microphones. So one of the first things you have to think about is who is going to be recorded. Do you have one person speaking? Do you have multiple people speaking If you're shooting a talking head video or an interview of just one person, you can really use any type of microphone. A La Valliere microphone can be a great option if they're just sitting down or even if they're moving around a shotgun microphone is also a great option if they're just sitting in one location or if they're moving around, you could get away with using a boom operator. If you're just in front of your computer, a USB microphone or a studio microphone is a great option for projects wh...

ere you're shooting multiple people in the same shot, you might have to get to La Valliere microphones so that you can record high quality sound for each person. If you are using a boom microphone, you might need a boom operator to be able to move the mic between the people when they're talking. The other thing you have to think about is where your camera is going to be and what your camera composition is going to look like. If you're shooting a big wide scene of someone outdoors or just a scene where a person is smaller in frame, you might not be able to use a shotgun microphone because it's going to be have to be in frame to get great audio. So in that case a la Valliere might be a great option. But if your composition is closer and you're tighter in on your subject, a lava lair or shotgun might work. Even if you're shooting in a quiet location with your camera not too far away from your subject, the internal microphone could be a viable option. Here's an example of recording in a quiet room with the smartphone's internal microphone sounds pretty good. So if you are shooting video and using the internal microphone either on your DSLR camera or your smartphone, you might be wondering why doesn't my audio sound good? You have to understand a G. C. Or auto gain control. This is how your camera or your phone monitors and sets levels for recording the audio. If I'm in a quiet room and I'm the only one talking then it's going to set levels for however loud my voice is and it might actually sound fairly decent but recording audio with the internal microphone of your smartphone won't sound great when you're in a loud location. But if I'm outside and I'm speaking and something louder than my voice happens, a thunderstorm or a car drives by then the camera will automatically set its levels to that loud sound, making my vocal sound, my voice at a lower level And that's why when you're outside you might not get that great of sound with your internal microphone. So we really only recommend using the camera's internal microphone if you're inside an environment that's quiet and you can control the sound, or if you're just trying to capture the sounds of your environment. So hopefully by now, you know how to pick the right microphone for your video shoot.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Using Fiverr to get work
Drive Download

Ratings and Reviews

seyi ope
 

i love the way they teach the course. its very understandable

Student Work

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES