Skip to main content

Photo Basics

Lesson 2 from: Fujifilm X-T3 Fast Start

John Greengo

Photo Basics

Lesson 2 from: Fujifilm X-T3 Fast Start

John Greengo

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

2. Photo Basics

Get a quick brush up on the basic components of the digital mirrorless camera: John’s graphics show how aperture, depth of field, shutter speed, and the aps-c sensor work together to capture images

Lesson Info

Photo Basics

all right. This is a short section for anybody who's somewhat new to photography, and you just kind of want to brush up on some of the basics. And let's talk about what we're working with here. We've got ourselves a muralist camera, interchangeable lens camera, lots of quality interchangeable lenses for it. Inside, each of the lenses is an apple tree in it, and this aperture is a opening that can open and close down and regulate the amount of light coming into the camera. Light comes through this aperture, and, as I say, you can control the size of the aperture. And so we have lots of different aperture size openings and these air all of course, controlled by the lens that you have. And there's a wide variety of lenses with a variety of aperture openings, and you can open it up and you can close it down, as I say to regulate the amount of light coming in as light comes in, and as you change the aperture, it also changes your depth of field. So when you start at 1.4, for instance, if yo...

u have one of those lenses that opens up quite a bit, you're gonna get very shallow depth of field as you stop the aperture down each one of these aperture stops. Let's in half assed much light, but it also gives you more depth of field. So more things. Aaron focus from front to back. If your lens stops all the way down to F 22 you're going to get a fair bit of depth of field in a given seen for the most part. So you've got two different things going on with the aperture. Now, as light comes in, it's going to try to get to the image sensor. But before it gets there, it needs to get past the shutter unit, which actually has two parts of first and a second curtain. And what happens? Because this is a mere list camera and you need to see what's going on. It keeps the first Shudder unit open so that you can get the light into the sensor so that information is fed to the LCD screen and the electronic viewfinder, so you can see what's going on now when it comes time to take a photo and I'm gonna show you this from the side and from the front. What happens is that one of those shutters needs to close so that the sensor can prepare to capture an image and then captures the exposure with the second curtain coming down and closing it. That way, each pixel is exposed for exactly the same amount of time. And then, of course, it needs to open again so that you can see so that you can compose for your next shot. And this is happening on this camera upwards of around 11 frames per second. So shutter speeds are obviously very important because they are another way of controlling the amount of light that we're recording variety of shutter speeds for controlling motion as well. And so you can choose the shutter speeds appropriate to the action and how you want that action toe look in your final photograph. So this is the most important elements on a camera like this. Inside the sensor, the heart and soul of the camera is also very important. In one of things that's critical to know about is the size of the sensor and how it compares with everything else out on the market, and this is kind of what I would consider a medium sized sensor. It's a little bit smaller than the ones based off of 35 millimeter film, which was very popular for many years and is currently known as a full frame sensor. And so this is using an A PSC or a 1.5 crop sensor, cause it's a little bit smaller than full frame by a factor of 1.5. And so when you're discussing lenses, it's helpful to know what size sensor you have in your camera and what lenses you have versus anybody else you are comparing these with. So that's just a little bit on the basics of photography. And I say, if you want more information about learning photography, I have a couple of classes you may like short one called the Photography Starter kit for beginners and then a more in depth one called the Fundamentals of Photography. And you can find out more about those at Creativelive

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Fuji X-T3 Recommended Settings
Fuji X-T3 Shortcuts

Ratings and Reviews

Justina Tumaite
 

Thank you it's super helpful. I loved it :)

Eric Geerts
 

I've been with CL for quite a while and I pretty much got used to (all of) John's top quality classes. Kinda been waiting for this one over the last months. So thanks again, John, for your consistent 5 star quality standard!!

Robert Felice
 

I loved this class! How much did I love this class? I loved this class and I don't even have an X-T3! I have the Fujifilm X100V, a camera similar enough to the X-T3 that this class easily covered 85% - 90% of the features on my camera. It's also a camera new enough that there isn't much available on how to use it. This class got the job done for me. Well done, John!

Student Work