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Shutter Speed

Lesson 7 from: FAST CLASS: The Art of Wildlife Photography

Tom Mangelsen

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Lesson Info

7. Shutter Speed

Next Lesson: Depth of Field

Lesson Info

Shutter Speed

Talk about shutter speed, four hundredths of a second, so it's not quite frozen, with a six hundredth, shows a little bit of movement. This is shot at an eighth of a second, motion blur, which is really fun to work with. So that you see the legs moving. And then you see this at a sixteen hundredths of a second, where it's frozen. So, just by changing your shutter speed, you change the mood, the portrait, but, that's just one thing you're doing changing the shutter speed. And this is like an eighth of a second, blue-headed parrots, and prowl off the Amazon River, leaving one of their, roosting and feeding areas, and it's just a blur of color. So, it's an eighth of a second. And this is like a twelveth or fifteenth, this is actually a mistake, but don't tell anybody, okay. (audience laughing) I was photographing that cheetah, after watching her for like five days. She'd literally park her five kittens or cubs, around our vehicle and leave us to babysit, now seriously, she was so comforta...

ble with us, and she'd go off on hunting. So, we kind of felt responsible, (audience laughing) because there's other vehicles around and we didn't want them to get run over. But that was, most fun babysitting and then she'd come back at night she would call and they would run to her and stuff. But one day she was out, hunting, and one thing about cheetahs you wanna let them hunt. You know, a lot of people gather around and you don't wanna get close ups and so I stayed away but a 600mm on with a 2X extender, and I thought, I'm gonna get her, you know, stalking and everything, and just about the time I put the 2X on, they head around the beanbag, and, she took off chasing this grant's gazelle, and they came right towards me, and I had it kinda set up at f/22, for, you know depth of field with the, both, the cheetah and the gazelle. I didn't expect her to run quite so quickly, as she was stalking and she bolted quickly, and then I looked at my camera settings, this is all manual days kinda, manually focused and, I said "Oh crap, I shot at that a tenthh of a second, "at f/22, "aah, "how stupid?" You know, and then I told my sister, I said, "This could be either gonna be really bad "or maybe it'll be okay", but actually, turned out okay. Did the same thing with the gorilla. I was photographing the troop, and I had a 80 to 200mm lens on, and as I was photographing the troop, I wanted to get the whole troop and the depth of field and it was like f/22, at about a 10th of a second, this gorilla decided to, chase off another, Silverback. I said, "Oh, man, I blew that one too," but it worked you know, again, don't tell anybody that I didn't do it on purpose. This I did on purpose, with the black wolves in Denali and it was just running through, this fall color and I thought this would be really neat if it was blurred, so I shot it like a tenth of a second. This is, one 32 hundredths of a second. That's how fast it takes this to almost stop the wings of a hummingbird. This is a thousandth of a second, on a great gray, and two thousandth of a second, to stop this, bear, which was shot last summer. But, that's great because you know, look at those water droplets are just frozen up. And of course, is probably a record. This is on film, it's probably, a second, maybe half a second, not sure but that flowing water, and this is probably more like three or four seconds, in Iceland, and this is probably a two second exposure or half second maybe on cranes.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Adorama Gear Guide
Elk Willows.mp4
Magic Hour.mp4
Last Great Wild Places.mp4

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