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Make Money Making Art

Lesson 11 of 20

Profiting From Partnerships

 

Make Money Making Art

Lesson 11 of 20

Profiting From Partnerships

 

Lesson Info

Profiting From Partnerships

So I just want to review the process with you. There again is my front yard, my front yard, the Pacific Ocean. That's what I dreamed of. And that's what I wished for. And that's what I got. And I didn't believe there's any way in Heck, I was gonna make that happen. So I want to remind you that, too, is that I did not believe it could happen. So you don't necessarily have to believe it. Not 100%. It's OK, all right, so the process let's talk about the process a bit. Just so we're grounded in it. Visioning is where we're spending a lot of time, right? This is where we get toe. Know thy self, right? Know thy self. This is what's inscribed the Temple of Delphi. Before you even go to see the oracle, you are advised. Know thy self valuing. We're also spending a lot of time on valuing, valuing meaning. Where can we create unique value above and beyond our art and be of service to others that will be of service to others? Dealing that's are making money plan. That's the one page outline that h...

elps us identify how we're gonna actually make money right out of business plan. It's a making money plan, so much more fine copyrighting. We don't delve into this too deeply, but it's critical to understand it. Your copyright represents your current and future income, and you have to protect those assets if you don't protect those assets, if it comes to blows, it could be it could be judge, that you have not protected your assets and you are giving the market implied permission to infringe on your copyright. Copyright is made too complicated because there's a saying that some professions complicate to profit. I think that's the CPS attorneys. Healthcare All complicate to profit if you just go Teoh the copyright. Um, this I'm talking about the US now. If you, which is based on the cop, are copyright law is based on French copyright law. If you go to the copyright off office's website, there's a great F A Q. They walk you through how to register your coffee right, and you can copy. You can register your copyright in a series so you don't have to copyright each and every piece of your art. I highly recommend you take that action so that you take your power. It's a critically important to have work copyrighted because the amount of damages you can claim is much significant, significantly higher. And I want to copyright infringement cases. And it helped that I had registered my copyright. And it's a great story. I'll tell you later. I loved doing her. I slam a house down. She had it coming. Totally had it coming. All right, Targeting. We got a idea of tribes, right? Vernon's tribe looks way different from my tribe. Tars, try. I was gonna look different again. Right in. See that? And we could see that in ourselves. Look at how we're dressed. Were all Look it. I've got different tribal jewelry. Then you guys right? Some are similar. Some are different. You usually, you know, you confined your tribe first and foremost because you share values. Remember, Kate Kate's tribe shares Kate's values. Kate, um, if you're watching Kate, Hello. So, Kate, uh, you know, Kate goes church. Kate is from the South. Family is very, very important. Those are those are very important values. And she shares those values with her tribe. And so again, this is so Look, look to that. That's where. Actually, that's what I'm working with. Creative life. Creativelive shares my values. That's they went in power, creative people. I want to empower creative people. So they've been a wonderful to work with. We should, and it's because we share the same values. We share creativity and we share empowerment and disrupting. This whole educational model is broken, which is great. Okay, so selling. We're gonna dive into selling. Who's afraid of selling? Okay, good. Just be honest. That's what's gonna help you. The truth will set you free. Um, here's what selling is It's just having a conversation. A guided conversation read Daniel Pinks book to sell his human. You're all selling whether you admit it or not, everyone is selling. Everyone is selling, there's no manipulation and selling those days are long gone. There's so much transparency with the Internet that you really can't manipulate people like you go back to my GM Saturn car story. You know, a lot of that is a lot of manipulation that occurred in the car showroom just doesn't it can't happen anymore because customers have access to information. It can't be manipulated like they once were right so. And if you give really horrible customer service than you know, someone will write a bad review on Yelp. I think it's, um is that uber or lift? One thing I really like about one of those companies is that you can rate the driver, but then if you are like, get picked up and you were drunk and you threw up in their car, they can rate you. And I think it's about time for things to go both ways in that arena. I think it's gonna tip that way. But really, it's again. It's about relationships and having conversations. You don't want to felt everybody sooner. You get to know the better. Profiting. It's all about more money coming in, less money coming out, right there's I'm sure there is a class that creativelive about about accounting and and money. We're not gonna dive too deep in it. I'm just showing you the process, and then we're at the end of the day, we're going to talk about accomplishing, which is remaining committed to a smarter goal and how you do that. Okay, so that's entered a little overview of where we're headed. Does that sound like a good plan down for that. Okay? Actually, I should just remind our I meant to say it in the open. I apologize. And all of these transitions slides that you've seen that beautiful blue ocean, and we all saw some of nappy estate. All of this is an zone work really are very, very talented artists as well as being on message in terms of business. Thank you. It's beautiful to see those images. Thank you. You go to andrey dot com if you want to see my work. I don't talk about one my work, because it's not about me. So one of the things that we started out was Why is it important to know how to answer the question? What do you dio right? Why was that important? Does anyone remember why that's so important? Right. Referrals and introductions, right? If you don't, if you don't actually articulate the value that you offer and what you do who who can refer you, it's number three. So if you have the action plan, if you've purchased of you in this studio, it's number 32 were on, I believe, three sources of referrals. So off the top Tara, when you were giving a little bit of background about what you're doing, you know what you're planning on doing? I immediately came up with a referral, right? So we came up with one source of referral for you because we we know Europe. Teoh. Does anyone else have a potential referral? Someone they could think of our organization that she might want to get in touch with Taro. Yes. Adopted and has been going through the process kind of on and off of searching for and not finding. And soon as you were talking yesterday, that's who popped into my head. Referral number two. Does anyone else think of someone for tar Person? But sort of ah, strategy that you could use is connecting with the online communities of, you know, in various chat rooms and forums of people who are going through the adoption process. People who have adopted who are also giving advice to others, you know. And if you're participating and sharing your stories and your emotional journey that you went on and sharing how you know you, um how your artwork has helped you through your process. Then people will connect with you on that level is, well, there's a huge online community of people who would really benefit from what you dio and what you create. Exactly. And so here's the thing. Online content is king, and these air really powerful stories that are grounded in the truth so I could see were definitely easily build an online platform Pretty in pretty short order. So there's referral potential. Exponential referral Number three. See how he's that waas done. It's that easy. When you get clear when you get focused, it's easy. It's when you hang in the middle, especially the middle of, um, you know, not committing to making money, not committing to being in business now Manas torture because you were Actually, you're in conflict with yourself. You're a conflict your own values, even if you're not conscious of it. So if you make a clear decision, it is good. It is good for Tara to do her work to create the center price. It's gonna heal people. I mean, it's a good business. It's a heartfelt mission. It's a good enterprise. Creative lives a great enterprise, right? Like how many people are they teaching? Pretty powerful. So, um, all right, let's go. Who? Let's see. Who else can we choose? Who's got a clear value proposition? Any volunteers? Wow. Just all the puppet one. All right, um, Vernon will take you because we know what your You know what your value proposition is, right? So Vernon helps people find access and express their unique voice. Whether that's through singing over the vets through speaking, is that correct? Ok, who needs Teoh express themselves that you know of anybody? Does anyone? Can anyone think of someone who would benefit from being able to express themselves clearly emotionally? Cheryl myself. Alright, referral number one. She just self referred herself. Right? Okay. Anyone else? How about hosts? Weigh my hands here to be stopped. Well, actually burn and doesn't help people who are do public speaking. You don't have to actually saying you don't have to go and perform on stage. Yes, I was going to ask running if you have focused your business on connecting with the corporate community and either doing you know, executives who have to be, um, give speeches or speak to their teams and motivate people because I think that could be a huge source of of community for you and then also, um, team building activities. You know, corporations really focus a lot around team building and activities, and that could be a unique workshop. I've done a little bit of the team building part of it, and I just started working with people in the company that are not are cutting companies that are, like employees that are not expressive enough not, You know, they feel like they can't express themselves because there for whatever reason, they feel intimidated inside of talking with groups of people that are much advanced in them, and they don't feel like they can really express themselves. So I just started to start doing that a little bit more for you, right? Yes, Quinn. So, HR professionals. Right again, Verne. And this would be people you actually want hang out with, You know, like they really you know, you share the same values. You have to check that first, because I mean, there are, you know that that's important. You have to like your I'm not saying that they're not gonna like hr professionals or anything like that. But, I mean, that's just Is that really your tribe? You have a concert recently with somebody who is in a corporate environment who needs to express herself more. So see you try it on, see if you like it. I mean, there is Google and all sorts of, you know, Facebook, I'm sure would hire you for for these things lost students, the ones who were thinking about going until litigation. Yeah, definitely. Yeah, but could probably they usually lost schools have a moot court competition. And I know this because my my boyfriend in art school went to law school and he was an actor on Broadway, and he just slammed it. He won that competition because he was acting. He was just at me. He had obviously had to new know his argument and all the points. But that's why he won because he was acting. So Yeah, that's great. So just how easy that was to find potential referrals for Vernon. Just make sense. All right, you guys air. Still working. All right. So should rule. Just let's take Cheryl. All right, Cheryl, you help you help women celebrate their relationships, their friendships on golf, the relationship with themselves. Is that about right? Yes. Okay. Correct. So So She said it enough that I get it. Well, I already work. I'm cheating, totally cheating. But you know, you could you It's easy to repeat, because when you were introduced this morning in the pre show, just roll right off your tongue. You didn't stumble. It's just natural, right? It's just what you say you were watching. Always watching. So Okay, so, um, does anyone have a friend like a best friend, for example, that you'd like to celebrate your relationship with? Maybe you get give her a necklace. Maybe you share a charm on a necklace and a bracelet. Anyone think of anybody in your life like who is like that? Their birthdays coming up. Raise your hand. Any damn. All right, wait. 123 Okay, all of you. Okay, everybody all right. So those are all referrals now, this isn't just play along. You guys need to go up to Cheryl at the end of the break or during the break and give her the names. Follow through. Let me tell you something about referrals, and this is this is sacred, sacred business. If you offer to give someone a referral, then you better do it this is the wreck sacred to business, sacred to reputation. If someone gives you a referral, you have to. You have to thank them and you have to follow up. And if you don't follow up, don't expect another one ever again because you don't deserve it. If someone goes to the trouble toe, open up their personal, valuable network to you and you flub it up. That's bad. Really bad Someone goes to the trouble. Pursue the referral may or may not be a good fit. That's okay. And look for ways that you can refer business back to them. Look, and it may not even be business. It may be just some other way to keep the exchange flowing. It's again just building relationships. And there's a whole principle of giver's gain. Don't worry about whether or not you're gonna get Get something back from that person. It'll come back to you some way if you give so look for you want to be looking for ways to build your enterprise, but it really does help to help others build their enterprise, and they'll be looking out for you. That's been my experience. It's been really gotten a lot of help and just, you know, just naturally think someone would really benefit from knowing someone. I heard something in the news that, you know, this person would really benefit from knowing or, you know, so think like that. Okay, I know you know that. I don't. You all know that's common sense. What's reminder? Yes, I have a question because we're talking about a little bit earlier. Um, about I guess this is a form of referral, but, you know, artists not really supporting other artists. You want to talk about it now? I dio It's like, you know, sometimes you here it is in the music business, like, Okay, that's a gig. I'm gonna get that gig. I'm not gonna say anything about anybody Michael refer to, Even though it may be better suited for the other person, you may not. You may hold back and say, you know, I'm not gonna let them because it's competition. And you know that. Yeah. The whole adage of you know, we're artist and we don't really share anything. The tribes don't share. This is so true. So when you're operating in an environment that's full of scarcity and ruled by permission, which is the established way of things. You're gonna You're gonna be a shark, You know about that shark. Have that fish my fish. Right. So that's what rule I'm making a broad generalization. This doesn't occur everywhere, but generally yet a lot of green eyed monsters, A lot of envy amongst artists. A lot of envy. That's the truth. They're envious. And it could be very judgmental. And I tell the artist that I coach that, expect it to happen that when you start succeeding, you're gonna have some friends drop off. They're not gonna take it. Friends who were in a similar place. But what's gonna happen is other people are going to step in who are more secure. Did you experience that, Cheryl? Yes. Yet in a big way. And it came from such an unexpected place, and it was so beneficial. It really actually made my fourth quarter last year. This relate new relationship with another artist, right? Did you have to fire some people in your process? You're the friend. You're the relationship lady. Oh, well, you have to review them periodically. But this was it just I have to make a decision. that really was about what was best for me in my business, and I left a shared studio space and it wasn't received well. And so, you know, the relationship, I think is damaged. But not because, you know, sometimes you just have to do you always have to do what's best for you exactly. And, um, I I personally have a real hard I struggle with that because my tendency is to do what's best for everybody else that I really had to rein that in. And that's something that you help me with a lot forcing me to see that right, whether I wanted to or not. Right. So, yes, I mean this doing what I did leaving the studio space. The next day, I got a phone call from somebody inviting me into to do shows in their studio That has a much wider range. Yes, yeah, so one of the rules in my book sell your art without selling out 101 rules is, um, you know, you have to think about relationships, opportunities based on Does this give me energy or does it take it away? Where's leave me flat? And if it's sucking energy. Um, you know, sometimes you're confused. Should I walk away from this up? This opportunity, something doesn't feel right. Does this friendship or does this relationship this colleague seem like Something's not right? Well, ask yourself, Does it seem to take energy away? Does it seem to leave you flat? Then he has to go. It's just that simple. You can decide a lot of the things that way really cuts to it. All right, let's go on to. This is a This is a great topic. This is about strategic partnerships. So strategic partnerships, what I based my business on. Originally, when I was working with the wineries, I had strategic partnerships with wineries, and I looked typically with strategic partnerships. Money doesn't change hands. It's really you look for ways to collaborate. You look for ways to create a win win situation. So in the case of my first iteration of my business, I have strategic partnerships with wineries where I would paint their vineyards and then sell them the reproductions at wholesale. They would retail them in their tasting rooms or give them as gifts to the best customers, and then they had to invite me to wine tastings where I would sell the originals. And, um what? The way the winery benefited was after the wine was long gone, it had been consumed. The their customer had a permanent ad in their home in their heart, right. So is really stealth advertising. And, um, I benefited because I had direct access to a meaningful moment for those tourists or for those wine enthusiasts. And they were drinking. So that was good. That helped facilitate sales. So that was the first iteration of my business. And you could see where do you see where everybody one. Right. Okay, so now I have one With the Four Seasons and the you know, here's the thing that took a lot of, like, dating It took a lot of dates, and I almost broke up with them. Actually, I did. I so use sometimes have to court and find out, you know, really? Are we a good fit? Is this Do our values align? Do we have a sin and that also, where do we share a similar tribe and the Four Seasons and myself? We said we share the same tribe. Their tribe looks like my tribe my tribe has money in my tribe tends to be entrepreneurial, Um, and it tend to say the four Stevens or places like that are resorts and Napa, for example. So we have the same tribe, and what I have is I represent local culture and flavor, right, and they need some of that. They need to put some heart into their meaning or some local color, no pun intended into their space. Right? Four Seasons Air, beautifully appointed. But they're very, very simple and contemporary. There's not a lot of there's no real reflection of the local environment or local culture. So by working with me, we benefit that way. Does it all make sense? Obviously, I benefit right because I get the Might and the power of their marketing department at headquarters behind me. So, um, it's a win win situation, and it took a long time to get there right. Started with an initial meeting and that I had to this person transferred and this person went here and oh my gosh, took a long time. Has anyone actually explored strategic partnerships? Vernon, where do you have a strategic partnership? Where have you explored one? Uh, usually with schools. Sometimes you team up with other schools to teach, like assemblies that come in. And I, uh, all the kids that are sometimes it's like a special thing, like for last month. It was, you know, Black History Month, right? Well, going into a school and do my little program with the kids teaching them about gospel music and where, uh, where that music that history of that music's I'm actually teaching them. You're history, your history, about all this music that they you know that they're listening. Teoh. I'll come in and I'll usually do like, you know, they'll have, like, 100 kids in the similarly or 50 kids and assembly. And sometimes sometimes it's a whole school. The whole school come in and I'll get them. I'll get literally the whole All the kids are saying. So that's kind of where the partnership. So I team up with educational organizations to you were in South Africa with a nonprofit. Yeah, And then I ous Wells that I teamed up with the foundation that in South Africa they didn't They didn't have anything like this. It was like, come from out space, and, um, basically, these kids, airport kids. It's a very rural area in South Africa and come in. And I have a colleague of mine who comes in and teach dance, teaches dance and art. And then I talked the music part, and these kids get the benefit from the energy that we're bringing to them because they don't have anything like this. I mean, they don't have IPods or anything like that. So it definitely was a win win situation for them because it brought this whole another other. It was two cultures, basically, you know, meeting team getting together. And it really expanded their reach for something different and something bringing something brand new into a community that would never even get this. So let me draw a distinction here because there's some of that. The distinction between you being hired as a, um, a resource versus a strategic partnership, right? So a strategic partnership is where you maintain your independence, right? Your they're running their business, they're running, you're running your business. But you look for ways where you can meet in the middle. Right where you can share could be that you are blasting out communications to your your email list, right? It could be that you like. I'll be at an event next month at the Four Seasons and mixing and mingling with their V I p guests. Right? And so they're not paying me. I'm not paying them. I'm just were just It's an opportunity for me to cultivate business and relationships. And for them, Teoh, bring in the person who did the art in the lobby. Right? So, um, so a strategic partnership is more where you're in partnership with someone. You're not actually working for them. So I just want to make sure we understand the difference between those two relationships. Does that make sense? All right, so, um, Tara is anyone. Can anyone think of strategic potential strategic partnerships for Tara and what she's up to? Adoption agencies, adoption agencies. So, my friend, if you'll notice down the hall here a creative live, um, there's sperm bank and my friend owns it. Actually, Sharon Mills, she owns it. So it's not adoption, but there's a missing piece, is there? And they have a similar journey. Have very similar journey. Um, so who knows? Right. Um, if they're looking for ways, Teoh create and celebrate stories you know and celebrate their clients experience. There may be ways for you to partner, right? They're not necessarily adoption, but similar. So there is another potential strategic partnership. So I'm putting three. Always put three because I can't think of more than three things at once. That's like too much after three. I'm done so And I also don't want to make sure you're not overwhelmed by this process. And, um, you know, just take it one bite of time. How do you eat an elephant? One bite in time, One bite. Just as you were asking me the question I was answering, a great question came in. I looked. It was a great question unless Lee said, Your tribe has to share your values and you need to like them. But how does that mesh with that idea that the customer is not you? I think this does tie into finding those strategic partners because I think you need to have a clear understanding of who your tribe is, how to find those partners and how to understand that if it's not necessarily you that we talked about yesterday, Well, it's not necessarily you economically. Typically, like I can't afford my own experience of art program is too expensive. I really it's expensive. But what One of the ways that I connect with some of my clients who tend to be entrepreneurial is they're they're just they're kind of interested in. This artist actually is interested in business and marketing. One of the one of the ways that we connect and another way that we connect and this is also key to understanding a luxury market is that, um, the creative process is fascinating to people, and we take this for granted, and we don't always put it in a context that are collectors or fans can understand. But that's why the cooking shows and with what we have. Celebrity chefs. When did chefs become celebrities? They became celebrities when they started to reveal their creative process on TV, like Thomas Keller and Michael Chiarello. That's what they did. They revealed the creative process, and they became celebrities. I looked because I operate a lot of, um, interest in wine country. I took note of that and I thought I'd met Michael. I've met Thomas. I could do that. All right, I could do that. I've gotta interesting creative process to share. So that's in fact, what I dio with my experience of art. Don't take that for granted. That's powerful. My point was, is this? People are inspired by your passion, so express it, express your passion, reveal your process. It's really interesting to people. It's why Bob Ross, the guy on PBS who taught painting glasses. I mean, he was. I mean, he's he was fascinating to people, and he actually created this huge brand. And then you can actually still by his paints in the art supply stores, I believe. I mean, I think you can still get Bob Ross paints. He created this entire brand, and all he did was, you know, show you how toe highlight waves and, you know, texture tree. And I'm giving you a really cheesy example on purpose. But just to show you if you look, that was really cheesy. What if he did something really authentic and really, you know, amazing. Imagine, you know what kind of what kind of interest that could garner. Yes, I couple of years ago was walking in a cemetery and without knowing why, I took out my cell phone and I started photographing the ironwork was specifically on the Crips. Um, I'm not a morbid person, but, you know, for whatever reason, it was an illusion. Anyway, what happened was the friend that I was with said, What are you doing? And I said, I don't know, but I feel like I need to do it. And by the next morning, I woke up and I thought, I don't know how I'm gonna do this, but I need to be able to translate these images there. So fantastic. I need to make jewelry out of them. I had no idea how to do that. I didn't have any specific skills. But what happened was just having the idea. The process unfolded, and I was explaining once I got the line done, actually, was the images that were up yesterday? Oh, yeah. Part of my notices, like the circular Capri one. I think, sir. It's put them up on my presentation. Like that necklace. They're copper. Yeah, that what it is? Etched copper. The gemstones that I use represent the colors that Aaron the stained glass. You know, a lot of those fancy Crips have beautiful stained glass windows behind, so they're all stained glass. You know, the stones are cut their called step cuts, so they're cut like they look like Mosaic. Um, a lot of thought went into the process, and I was describing this at a show to a customer that was curious. And all of a sudden I had all these people behind you have a story cell. I sold out because they were going to get a story. It was a true story. Yeah, And people were I I couldn't believe people were interested in hearing about my dream in my process. You know, it just didn't It didn't. Yeah. Do you remember what I did during the first segment yesterday? What did ideo it told you? A bunch of stories? Yes. Yes, I did that very deliberately. The hook you and to And to make my point and help you remember my point. You know, I get I grabbed your attention with the story. The story fells. Definitely. The story is very interesting to people's. I'm so glad you offered that up because that's critical to understand that. Tell the story. That's why I mean, what do you doing? What's artist? What are art historians doing? They're telling the story of the artist and their their process and their their struggles, their their context in history, right? That's what that is. That's why it's significant. It marks history. That's a great That's a great story about story. Okay, so let's go on to our next segment. We're gonna talk about selling. Yea. Ready? Yeah, shrinks down. Think it's BS would. All right now what if I said this? We're going to talk about having conversations a little bit better. All right, All right, so in my book, sell your art without selling out. I'm inviting everyone here in the audience. Everyone at home. There's a blank page next to the rule and I want you to color, scribble, agree, disagree. I don't care what you dio and please send it. Teoh answers at making art making money dot com because I need to write the second version of the book. And, um, we're going to start off with Rule number 63 an artist in the Philippines. I hope you're watching Jerome. He contributed to one of my pages. And this rule is significant to this next segment. Rule 63 some will, some won't. So what next. I don't know what that says, but it's probably good. Can anyone read this at home, Jerome? Preventing my wow crack spam crap. Awesome. Not no question, Mark. So these are all the numbers of people that you're gonna have to actually have a conversation with, and some of them are going to say they will soon. We're gonna say they won't some of them to say so. What? Care about your story? It all care about my story. Next, Right? We're going to line up and they're gonna They're gonna actually you're gonna sell out, right? You don't know. It's a numbers game. So that's why this is a contact sport. You get out, meet people, and just be natural. Be authentic here. This is what I just did. A quick translation. Okay. Thank you. A maestra. It's this fundamental question of meaning. Life is the masterpiece of the creative Beautiful. Really, We're going to talk about this more in depth, but I want you to later on in the segment. But what I want to do is talk about talk a little bit more about how to build your tribe. But in building your tribe, you have to sort of maintain this mentality, right, that it's just some people are part of your tribe. Some people were the same feather, and some don't. So what right so belong to my tribe. And they don't belong to your tribe, is it? It really is already judgment. But this at all. Does it matter? The world's abundant. There's lots of opportunity. There's lots of money to be made, especially if you're in the Bay Area. Oh my gosh. And with the Internet, you can access more than that's been more more than it has been drawn and represented here many, many more.

Class Description


Do you want to sell your art, without selling out?

Join nationally-noted painter Ann Rea for a comprehensive introduction to the sequential process that you’ll need to build a fine art enterprise.

During this course, Ann will be teaching you how to create value above and beyond your art.

You’ll learn how to define your mission and how to create a "Blue Ocean Strategy" that serves a target market and eliminates the competition.

Rather than pursue a "career" within the scarcity and permission-based art establishment, Ann will teach you how to take the reins and build a creative enterprise.

Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

No more starving artist paradigm!! I LOVE this class SO much and I am only on Segment 5. So generous, so thoughtful. I am a career coach and I help analytical professional women who miss their creative side bridge the gap into discovering a career they really love, so I am taking this class to continue to help support their journey and be able to more clearly articulate the path ahead of them no matter their creative medium. (Though I work primarily with mindset vs strategy.) I am putting so many pieces of the puzzle together. I have been a student of business for a long while, but never thought about ART that way - particularly as solving a problem. Ann says: "Make it about THEM, when you make it about them, it becomes about YOU" -- I can't quite put my finger on it, but it FEELS like what she is talking about is tapping into the collective oneness. That idea of what do "WE" want to create? VS a "selfless" persona which is what it seems MOST people make that mean (ie "how can I chameleon myself to what I *think* people around me want so that I can make money?"). OR, being so AFRAID of being a chameleon, that we aren't open to SEE how what we want to create actually meets what others want. We just have to be open to the connection, and then take responsibility for articulating it. Ann articulates this in a way I only intuitively knew before. So I just want to thank Ann for the thoughtfulness she put into your process and for sharing it, and being a leader of the revolution. It only makes my commitment and confidence to my career path and passion. This is possible for anyone who is brave enough to step into the journey. This further proves the point, and helps you FEEL it -- the only thing between you and your dreams is you (and that is the GREAT news!)

Peggy Collins
 

I found this course exciting, inspiring, enlivening, informative, and so much more. Ann Rea is a natural teacher who knows how to keep her topic interesting. Her interactions with the students were fascinating and quite helpful because I could apply their situations to my own. I only wish there had been more time for online questions to have been answered. I bought the course because it kind of reminded me of a good movie...there were so many gems that it was hard to take it all in during one viewing. A+ for Ann!

a Creativelive Student
 

No doubt about it, this was by far the most brilliant and engaging business program for artists that I have ever witnessed! Thank you so much for all the work that everyone put into it, and especially to Ann. I was amazed at her energy and passion, this made the entire course very enjoyable as well as hopeful as to our future possibilities. It felt like drinking from a fire hose at times, but since I bought the course (best investment ever!), I will be able to return to it over and over as the plan evolves. Thanks again to all involved, you have no idea how valuable this experience was to me personally...life changer! THANK YOU!