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Lens Options

Lesson 10 from: Nikon D850 Fast Start

John Greengo

Lens Options

Lesson 10 from: Nikon D850 Fast Start

John Greengo

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Lesson Info

10. Lens Options

Dive into Nikon's excellent Nikkor lens options, including recommendations specific to the D850 camera body. Learn how to recognize a compatible full-frame lens compared to a DX-format lens that will crop your photos to the APS-C format. Recognize Nikon's shorthand for lens features, like the VR (vibration reduction) to designate a VR lens.
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Lesson Info

Lens Options

All right, let's talk a little bit about some of the lens options that are available for the D850. Nikon has two main lineups of lenses, their FX lenses and their DX lenses. It's only slightly complicated because the FX lenses are not labeled as FX, but the DX lenses are clearly labeled as DX lenses. The FX lenses are designed for full frame sensors, which means that they have a coverage area big enough for the entire image area on a full frame sensor. It's a perfect match in that regard. The DX sensors are designed to have a smaller image circle that meets up perfectly with the smaller sized sensors in the DX cameras, like the Nikon D7500 or 5600, as those many, many other Nikons with that regard. If you wanna take a DX lens and mount it onto your D850 here, well you can do it and you can shoot photos. The problem is that it does not spread that image out over the entire image frame. You're gonna get a darkening of the corners. One of the options that you'll able to turn on, on this c...

amera, is the auto DX crop, which will automatically crop the frame in when it knows there's a DX lens on there. Chances are, that's what most of you would wanna do if you put a DX lens on this camera, although I don't recommend it, because you're gonna be throwing away a lot of potential resolution. It's gonna reduce that 46 megapixels about in half when you get down to just the DX area. You can take the lenses for your 850, that are FX lenses, and you can use them on those smaller sensor cameras, if you want. They do create a very large image circle, but there's no problems with that, no determent. You're just photographing and capturing an area in the middle of the frame. The FX lenses, as I say, they're not labeled as FX, but if they don't have a DX, then they're probably an FX. The DX lenses are are very clearly labeled with the DX. Just to be perfectly clear, there is another grouping of lenses, for the Nikon Mirrorless system, that are notably smaller in size, and they are designed for a completely different camera system that has no adaptability onto any of the SLRs. If you're at a garage sale, or picking up something used online, make sure it's not one of the Nikon-1 system lenses. On your lenses, Nikon has a number of different features of the lens that they like to promote and talk about, and categories that they wanna help you categorize which lens grouping it is in. You'll see this with the various letters on the camera. We'll talk a little bit more about this as we get into the recommended lenses. When you look at your lenses, you got your CPU contacts there on the back. Your lens mounting mark, to get it lined up. Zoom lenses will have a big zoom, usually pretty close to the body, but sometimes the focus and lens can be moved around, depending on what they think is right for that particular lens. You'll see your distance scale, not on all lenses, but lenses that do have it, it can be helpful to know where the camera is focusing and to see it focusing. Pretty much all the lenses are gonna have a nice big focusing ring. Each lens either comes supplied or has available, a dedicated lens hood, that's gonna block extraneous light, that's gonna give you the best image quality and contrast in any given lighting situation. I recommend using those lens hoods on a regular basis. Most all of the lenses have a standardized thread mount system. This particular lens is 82. Other lenses will be different in size, so if you wanna get any sort of filters, it will say right on the front what the thread size of your particular lens is. Over on the side of the lens will be a focusing switch. There are two different common switches that you'll find on many of the Nikon lenses. The first is an M and A switch, where it's pretty easy. It's in either auto focus, or manual focus. You can choose wherever you want it. The ones that have the M/A M option, the M/A stands for automatic focus with a manual override. If your camera's in auto focus, and you would like to manually override it, you know, for a short period of time, after the camera is focused. You press halfway down to focus. You decide that's not quite right where you wanna focus. You can readjust focus just by grabbing the focus ring and turning with your finger halfway down on the shutter release. It's a special clutch that they built into the lenses. Not all lenses have it. It's kinda considered a mark of a higher end lens. Let's look at some of the recommended lenses for this type of camera. Your standard zoom, the 24 to 70, 2. or the newer version with the vibration reduction are some of the more popular options with this camera. Keeping that fast aperture of 2.8, they do make the 14 to 24, which is at this point, a legendary lens. The 70 to 200, which is also one of the most popular work horses lens out there. It's gonna be a very popular lens choice. As I said before, there's lots of lens codes that Nikon likes to use. Here is a key to some to the more common features and attributes of Nikon lenses. I'm not gonna go through all of these, but one of the more important ones to look at is the electronic aperture, the G. You'll see this right after the aperture setting. That's where they have a lot of their current lenses. On some of them, they're adding an E now, which is for their latest Electromatic, electromagnetic diaphragm opening. You wanna be very aware of the different options for different lenses and different lens eras. Some other options that I think are really good are the series of lenses that are in F4 and maximum aperture. These tend to be a little bit less money. They tend to be a little bit smaller and lighter weight than the 2.8 lenses. They are good for general purpose, for travel photography, for landscape photography. If you are doing a lot of people photography, and movement and shutter speed being more important in that case, the 2.8 lenses are my preferred options, but for general work, the F4, I think is gonna make life a little bit easier, 'cause it's a little bit less weight to carry around. Nikon of course has plenty of primes or fixed or non-zooming lenses that are absolutely beautiful. These are some of the best lenses out there. That new 105, 1.4E is an amazing lens for shooting portraits with, but all of these are really good lenses. There are some other ones that they brought out. They recently brought out a 28 that's really nice. These are some really nice premium lenses that you can get that are really the best that money can buy. Next up are some sweet primes, I like to call them. These are not their top of the line lenses, but these are still really good lenses that I think of as really good values. All of these are less than $1000. Some of them are less than $500. They've been coming out with a number of these 1.8 aperture, maximum aperture lenses, that are really quite nice. If you do want a lens to fill a particular need, but you don't need to go over the top in size, weight and money, these are some really nice options. There's a few more beyond these, but I think these are some of the best ones out there. This being a 46 megapixel camera, you do need to use good lenses on it. One of the things you'll notice about the Nikon lenses is that all the better lenses have this gold ring around the front of it, and so these gold ring lenses are typically the newest versions of the lenses. You can use really old lenses with this camera, which is great, but some of those lenses were not designed with a 46 megapixel sensor in mind when they designed them. Some of them, you may not be getting all 46 megapixels of image quality out of it, but if you do wanna get the highest image quality you're gonna need to look for their higher end, more current current lenses. If you are interested in learning more about Nikon lenses, I have an entire two day class on the complete guide to Nikon lenses. I'll talk about all the different photos, or all the different lenses in there. I'll talk about all the technology that's being used. I'll talk about how to choose a lens and how to use a lens and examples with a variety of different lenses in there. If you wanna know more about lenses, check out the Nikon lens class.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Nikon_D850_Recommended_Settings.pdf

Ratings and Reviews

a Creativelive Student
 

Excellent class. Very fast paced which I loved. I have had my D850 for a few months and thought I had it all figured out. I learned some awesome tips and tricks that I am eager to start using. Thanks John:-)

Susan
 

This is a great class with an exceptional instructor, and I learned so much about my new D850 camera! I especially appreciated the opportunity to follow along at a perfect pace with the instructor while being hands-on with my camera. The content was understandable, logical and enjoyable. This is my first class through CreativeLive -- thank you!

Francis Sullivan
 

82 yrs old. Been an avid photographers since 5 yrs old. Read and listened to all types of photo teachers. Greengo is the best of all. Every so called photographer can still learn from a master on the D850. Fantastic camera and fantastic teacher.

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