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Enhancing Your Final Render in Photoshop

Lesson 6 from: Building Photo Realistic Environments in Adobe Dimension CC

Jesús Ramirez

Enhancing Your Final Render in Photoshop

Lesson 6 from: Building Photo Realistic Environments in Adobe Dimension CC

Jesús Ramirez

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Lesson Info

6. Enhancing Your Final Render in Photoshop

Lesson Info

Enhancing Your Final Render in Photoshop

Also something that is really, really cool, is the depth information, this is known as a "depth" map. So, dimensions, since it's working in 3D space, can figure out depth between the different objects in the scene. And the reason that you would want that information in Photoshop is so that we can use the really, really powerful filter in Photoshop. I'll show you how that works. I'll just select my depth information and make sure that no other layers are enabled, that we only see black and white images. Then, I'm gonna go into the "Channels" panel and from the "Channels" panel, I can duplicate the channel. And actually, I had already one duplicated there and I'll delete it so that it doesn't confuse you. So we have the red, the green and the blue channel. These are the channels that make up the image. In a black and white image, all the channels are the same so it doesn't matter which one you select. So like any of the channels and duplicate that channel and you might want to give it a ...

name so I'll just call it "dimension depth". Dimension depth. You can call it whatever you want. Then I'm gonna go back into my RGB composite view and and I'm just going to disable that that additional groups layer. I'll explain what the difference is between the rendered image and the reduced noise layer, but for now I'm just going to select the "rendered image" and I'm gonna go into "filter "blur", "lens blur". This filter allows you to recreate how a lens would work in real life. I'm not really sure why it's giving me that redraw error but anyway, it tries to recreate how a lens would work. So we can create a "shallow depth of field" effect. And notice one thing, look at that, dimension depth, depth map. So then, Photoshop immediately know that we duplicated that that channel and it loaded it automatically for us. So now we have that depth information, that channel that we duplicated, applied to this filter. What that means is now this is acting almost like a real lens, so to speak. So, I'm just gonna increase the radius so you can see how much it's gonna blur the image. See how it's blurring the image? And this is a little slow because it takes a lot of rendering power to blur all of that. And the reason it looks noisy is because I have "noise" applied to it, I'm just gonna remove that noise so that you don't see the noise there. So I'll just set it to zero, so there's no noise. So notice now that everything is out of focus except the thing that is closest to us. But the cool thing is now, that I can click on something, for example, I'm gonna click on that soccer ball. Watch what happens when I click on the soccer ball. Everything is now focused to that part of the image, so Photoshop recognizes the depth in the scene and now we're creating that "shallow depth of field" effect. Now the lamp is blurry, everything close to us is blurry, everything in this area is in focus and everything behind that is out of focus and you can, of course, adjust all these different sliders to control the amount of focus that the image has. So no matter- so whatever you click on is what will be in focus. So I can click on different things and since you have that depth information that you brought in from Adobe Dimension, Photoshop will try to figure out what the image would look like if it were actually a real image and you were shooting it with a lens and try to get things in focus and out of focus. So you can make some really cool shallow depth of field effects with that. And um, this is probably a little too much information for the class, but I will also mention that on Facebook, you probably have seen those 3D images that when you're scrolling up and down Facebook, they kind of move, this is- you would use a depth map to create that effect on Facebook and I don't know if anybody has a class in CreativeLive, but I will look it up and I'm sure somebody has that technique in there somewhere. But anyway, so, the things that Adobe Dimension- the layers that Adobe Dimension brought in were the "render image" and the "render image with reduced noise". So what happens sometimes is when you render and image, you'll either set it to the medium setting or the fast setting because the long setting takes too long to render. And the less quality you have on a render, the more noise you're gonna get on the image. So Adobe Dimension, by default, creates a layer and it just basically does a camera- what the equivalent of what a camera raw reduce noise would do, it just blurs those noisy pixels. In some cases, it's okay, um, in my particular image, I felt that it was too, um, too strong. I don't know if you'll be able to see it but I'll zoom in, so you can see that- see the difference? See how it blurs all that detail on that uh, entertainment center? See that? So that's why I don't like that "reduced noise" layer as much because I just feel that it blurs a lot of that detail. So use it if it works in your image, in my case, I didn't like it so I - I didn't use it, so I used the "render image". And then obviously the background image that you used on your 3D scene, that gets brought back into Photoshop. So, what I will do in this case, is I will just convert the regular rendered image, not the reduced image, into a "smart object". Right click, "covert to smart object", so I can work non-destructively in case you don't know what a "smart object" is, it's simply a container that holds one layer or multiple layers and you can distort them, apply adjustments or filters non-distructively, which means you can come back and edit them later. And you can go into "filter", "camera", "raw filter", and just make an adjustment like you would adjust any other image. So I could maybe brighten up the shadows, reduce the highlights, add a little bit of texture, which is brand new in Photoshop, I think it's about a month old right now. And if I zoom in, you'll see what that's doing. I'll do 100% and pan by holding the "space" bar, and notice how I can increase the texture in the scene, see that? Or I can just reduce the texture. In this case, I don't want that. I can increase clarity, which is contrast in the mid tones, and add vibrance which is a smart way of saturating the image. Vibrance saturates pixels that have low saturation and it protects skin tones, unlike saturation, which just bumps saturation of all pixels equally. So I usually prefer using vibrance for that. And I can maybe warm up the image just a tiny bit, press "ok" and obviously I can probably go in there and make further adjustments, but I think that you get the idea. The important thing is that I'm working with a "smart object" and you can see the smart filter I applied. This will read the filter that I applied, in this case the "camera raw" filter. If I wanted to make an adjustment, all I need to do is double click on "camera raw" and continue adjusting it. So maybe make it brighter, maybe little warmer, maybe even add a radio filter, and just warm that area a bit more, and let me do the inside, not the outside. I just wanna make it seem as if the sun is hitting that wall a little bit brighter than the rest of the image. Something like that. And that's more or less how I got that final image that you saw, just by making those adjustments in "camera raw". So, and this is how you would enhance your final render in Photoshop"

Ratings and Reviews

JennMercille
 

This class blew my mind! Before watching, I probably wouldn't have even attempted incorporating 3D into my composite work. Now, it is WAY less intimidating. I can't wait to try it out!

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