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Shooting and Editing for Mobile Photography

Lesson 6 of 12

Shooting Skylines

 

Shooting and Editing for Mobile Photography

Lesson 6 of 12

Shooting Skylines

 

Lesson Info

Shooting Skylines

So I made it to the fairy and I'm super super excited because it's a gorgeous day. It's cleared up a little bit and I'm super excited because we've got a skyline and that's what I've been looking for for a little bit. And we've also got some water to play around with. What I'm gonna be looking out for today is for some awesome detail of the skyline, probably some shots of some birds I can use later as some stock footage. And then also, whatever else I can capture, I hear hopefully some silhouettes of some trees, hopefully some silhouettes of some mountains, something that we can use in the future that can give us some awesome creative images. When I scouted here yesterday, I was obviously becoming more aware by the second that time is of the essence. So when I'm over here, I'm definitely trying to make sure that the distance is the right distance that I need for the shot, but also making sure that the empty space that I need in order to edit later is there. So what I like to do is I li...

ke to shoot horizontal so that I get more skyline that I can play with, because if I'm shooting vertical, I'm getting more water and more sky. But what I really want to do is play with that skyline as much as possible. So I'm gonna go ahead and shoot horizontal tap on the buildings and just make sure that they're in focus. I'll also bring down the exposure. I feel like the war that I bring down the exposure on a certain occasion. It gives me a little more detail, and it's not as blown out. I'm trying to get. Much of that skyline is possible in a nice, clear shot. This is a really good distance for me, actually, really enjoy this distance. The buildings aren't very small and they aren't really big. And then also that bottom half that we were a little worried about earlier that was a little too jumbling and messy is not there anymore. So now I can really just focus on that skyline and play with that as much as possible. We've also got a boat in the shot variables. They're gonna happen. That's just a part of the gig. You want to get all angles and also I hardly ever zoom in. And that's also the thing. You're gonna lose quality the more you zoom in. So I'd suggest giving your shot regular style and playing with it later cropping if you must. I really enjoy this end Mauritz a little more filled out rather than this way. So I'll probably shoot a little more of this and really play with that. I enjoy the way that the it kind of comes at a peak there and everything kind of it almost looks as if, like that one buildings, same height is that one a little bit and it kind of balances it out. So I'm all about seeing how we can kind of balance the shot. Maybe in the future is wound balance the edit. So maybe you know, if you did feel like zooming in a bit, try it out. See how it works is the farther you get away, the less you'll probably be active anyway. So try out as much as you can also try to get some photos of the water because later maybe you don't have enough water. And in the original shot of that skyline, because it was horizontal, so what you can do is use that water shop, blend it back in and make the shot a little whiter. I'll probably come down more water in there, shoot the needles from far away, and now we've got the skyline taking over our entire screen. So that's great. Now I got most of panorama of that long skyline we can eventually cut out. And really, if we wanted to make a silhouette of this easily, which is nice because we're dealing with a really nice day where the sun's not too crazy and it's also the sky is a little bit more blue and kind of easy to work with and work around. So we really wanted to cut around it. It would make it super simple. I don't shut my phone off. I don't I don't lock it or anything like that. I always keep my camera open and ready to go so that in case anything that comes up, I'll be able to grab it. This is definitely looking good, but the farther we get away, the less detail we have. So for me, I'm probably done with the skyline. At the moment, I'll probably take a look at the photo see what else I need. But for right now I'm more focused on may be capturing some pictures of some birds. Or also we've got some trees coming up on that side, and maybe we can play with those silhouettes as well. And I know the sun's coming up on that side, so we probably won't get too much detail on that side anyway. There's a specific edit that in thinking about where I had me in a giraffe walking up a hill and I couldn't find a specific hill or some kind of interesting silhouette to put that looks like were walking on something to come up. So what I like to do every now and then is actually capture a silhouette of something and use that later to my advantage. So I'm gonna go ahead and just get the Sylhet to save later. And what I also noticed is something, and I'll bring the exposure down a bit. I also noticed that there's one single cloud in the sky, and for me I'm just obsessed with clouds and putting them in my shots every once in a while and specifically it is hard to come upon a shot of one single cloud in the sky. So I'm definitely definitely gonna take advantage of that one single cloud. And also, I'm noticing that my my camera, every time I try to tap and focus on something, it's kind of going in out of focus. When I look back at my lens, I can see that there's fingerprints on it. So what I'm gonna go ahead and do is just wipe it off on my shirt. And that's something you got to keep in mind when you're shooting with your phone is that your hands have oil on them When you're touching and typing all these different things in between shooting, you're gonna notice that your your finger will touch the lens at some point, so make sure you always wipe it off. You will notice a difference right after you tap on the image that it does work way better. So super happy about that. While I'm out here, I'm always keeping my camera open and ready to go, just in case anything else comes up that I want to shoot. Whether it be birds, well, slap in the water, different angle. Whatever the case may be, always keep camera open, just in case anything comes up getting closer now keep tapping, bringing that exposure down to get more clarity of the building. I bring the exposure down just so there's no extra whiteness in the shot. The white kind of blows it out a little bit, so I always bring the exposure down a bit. Gives me a lot more detail of the actual skyline. Every distance matters every every inch matters. Take as many as you can as your inching forward cause any angle and every distance will matter in time and you're looking back. I wish I got that one extra angle because this one prospective of this edit with other stock image that I have worked so much better whether you want to keep the edit simple or whether you want to do something really surreal and crazy, you can use the skyline when you've got much more detail involved, and I'm really loving how blue the sky is right now to it makes it so easy for you to use the skyline, cut out the background image and replace and do whatever you feel like doing. The closer we get a little more difficult it is to work with all of that bottom half of the skyline. But we can still I see so much detail in the buildings here, which I absolutely love. I'm still going to keep shooting. The bottom half is not bothering me one bit right now, but I know the closer we get, the more messy it's gonna be. So definitely want to take advantage that I also want to get some super simple pictures of the water, and I'll do them long ways. This in case maybe later, I might want to fill it out somehow some way. And I'll keep shooting horizontal just to get more space of the skyline in my image. If I'm shooting vertical, all I'm getting is more water and more sky. And at the end of the day, those are the things I'm gonna be editing the most, or maybe out of the shot. So I want to keep the skyline key and heavy

Class Description

Do you follow people on Instagram who get all of the likes that you’d be happy to have on your own page? Are you trying to edit your images to attract more followers and possibly sponsors? Join Elise Swopes, well-known Instragramer and commercial photographer as she shows you the best ways to work with your iPhone for personal and professional success.

In this class, Elise will teach you:

  • The camera settings on your iPhone and how you should be using them
  • How to scout for locations and capture the show that you want
  • How to organize your images within your Photo app
  • The best editing apps to use and why
  • Editing techniques from basic to advanced

By the end of this class, you’ll have the confidence to post your creative and well-edited images and generate the attention that you want on social media.

Reviews

Kate Crossley
 

Found it very interesting how Elise translated Photshop style art composition onto her mobile and how she scouted for images. It would have been good to have had a list of the apps she uses in the class information page. I had to go to her website to find them. I appreciate she mentioned them in her tutorial but a list would have been helpful too. Having been doing composite work on my iphone recently it was great to see another artist at work and their approach. All in all, very enjoyable class.

Jennifer Pinter
 

I think the class could have been longer with more detail about the editing. I am glad I purchased the class and can go back to watch again because she goes through the editing process very fast. Overall some good tips about shooting with your phone and worth $25 to me.

Ken Hattie
 

I cannot attest to the course content as I tuned out after and left after the 10the use of the irritatingly over-used word, by videomakers, "super". By god, get a thesaurus, people.