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ISO, F-Stop, and Shutter Speed

Lesson 4 from: Capture and Edit Photos of People in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop

Jared Platt

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Lesson Info

4. ISO, F-Stop, and Shutter Speed

We take a closer look at Jared’s photos: what settings did he choose for this particular image and why? Jared explains how adjusting ISO, f-stop, and shutter speed affect your images.

Lesson Info

ISO, F-Stop, and Shutter Speed

For this image, we're shooting at 100 ISO, and the reason we're at 100 ISO is we want to keep the image as clean as possible. So the lower the ISO, the cleaner the image is gonna be. The higher the ISO, the more grain and noise you're gonna get. So we're keeping it at 100 ISO. The f-stop is at 4.5. Now, the f-stop deals with your aperture. That's the size of the hole that the exposure is going through. So the higher the number, the more focus you have. The smaller the number, the less focus you have. I want to kind of be in a sweet spot. I wanna have enough focus so that I can focus on Devon and Indiana at the same time, but I don't want so much depth of field that the trains are sharp, as well. The shutter speed is at 1/400th of a second, and the reason that I've chosen 1/400th of a second is because I'm hand-holding a long lens. Now, if you've ever been in a situation where you took a picture and everything has motion blur, even the lamppost, which should be absolutely still, that's ...

because you were moving your camera and your shutter speed was too slow. So the faster the shutter speed, the more it can stop action. The slower the shutter speed, the more you have blur. 1/400th of a second is a pretty good safe bet for a situation like this where people aren't moving too fast and you can stand fairly still, but you can still hand-hold something. If I was photographing sports or if I was a little bit more shaky, then I would want to increase the shutter speed to, say, a thousandth of a second or even higher to make sure that I wasn't getting motion blur. So we're at 1/400th of a second at f4.5 at 100 ISO. And now we can compose and really focus on how the shot's going to look.

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I enjoyed this quick tutorial. A very good introduction to how to use lightroom.

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