Discovering Your Creative Voice

 

Lesson Info

Reframe

So how we frame or reframe the experiences of our lives affects the experience that we have. I learned this first hand when I was in college. I was a camp counselor at this camp up in the Santa Cruz mountains in the redwoods, it was so much fun. So there we were and one night during the week of those camps, all of the guy counselors and the guy campers would hop in to the pool and just have a ton of rowdy fun and the kids would always say hey, can you throw us? And so they would stand on our hands, one, two, three and they would fly and invariably one kid would lose balance and then all of a sudden, the belly flop right? That kid would come up out of the water and lock eyes with you looking for interpretation of the event. Now as a counselor, there were two options. One I could say, oh no, the kid would cry and the evening would end. Or the other option which is what all good counselors do is they say, yes and the kid would say look how red my stomach is and then everyone would start b...

elly flopping and it would turn into this huge belly flop festival. Now how we frame or reframe what we do isn't necessarily a new concept. I like how Shakespeare put it. He said, "Nothing is or isn't but thinking makes it so." And we can apply this in different ways. The historian Steven Ambrose, this is his approach, he writes about these historical events. When he sits down at his laptop, rather than thinking of it as a laptop, he considers it a campfire. He imagines himself at the end of the day trying to tell these stories that would captivate these other people around the campfire. And so for him, it's that subtle reframing or mental shift which helps him to write in a unique way. Another way to think about this is how we capture images. As a photographer, one of the things that I do, I know that I can reframe an image in order to convey or communicate different ideas and that leads to this action step idea that I have for you. Here it is. What I want to you do is to go out and photograph a friend but I want you to photograph that person in 10 different ways. Here are a couple of ideas. Photograph them so they look very tall. That means you need a low camera angle. Or photograph them so they look small so that there's a small person and a really huge frame. Photograph them from the side, tilt the camera, make them look ugly, beautiful, appear like a friend or an enemy, you get the idea. And the point isn't the picture or those pictures but it's integrating this idea of reframing into your life because then what you can do is apply that to other problems that you have. You know sometimes a solution is all about just shifting your perspective or your frame. Here are a couple of other book recommendations that might help as well. One is called The Obstacle Is The Way by Ryan Holiday. This is an awesome book and it's all about embracing these obstacles that we face. Another classic in this space, perhaps one of the most profound books here is called Mindset by Carol Dweck. Another great read. Well either way, a couple books but more importantly those exercises that you can take, you can practice with your camera so that you can develop a mindset which is a bit more about reframing which will then help you develop your creative voice in other areas of your life and your work as well.


Creativity is what inspires every photographer to take a photo; it pushes you to expand your skills and is also what sets you apart from your peers. But how do you stay creative? What do you do when you’re in a creative slump? How do you challenge yourself to continually take chances and grow as a photographer? In this unique CreativeLive course, Chris Orwig will walk you through 25 lessons that will help ignite your creative spark and generate authentic work while living life to its fullest. He will cover problems that every creative encounters and give you actionable steps that lead to solutions.

This class will guide you on how to keep your dreams alive and push you toward your fullest potential. You’ll be able to go back and reference these lessons to help you grow, stay focused and be the person that you aspire to be in order to live a creative life.  

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • Excellent. Would recommend this to every creative soul. Inspiring . Thank you very much Chris for this course.
  • Wow...we need more of Chris Orwig..His wisdom in life mix with photography is extraordinary! What a great gift I got from creativelive..that gift is Chris Orwig. thank you soo much
  • A fund of inspiration and food for thought. But you have to look at it several times to get it all, because sometimes Chris is speaking so exited that he speaks to fast - at least for me. And I am missing the visual stimulation and visual exercises for discovering my creative voice as a photographer.