Grow Your Business with YouTube

Lesson 8 of 25

About the Interview Format

 

Grow Your Business with YouTube

Lesson 8 of 25

About the Interview Format

 

Lesson Info

About the Interview Format

Now, an interview show is, you've seen a million of these, it's you interviewing someone. You see this all the time on cable news, it's like two heads split screen. Somebody asking the question, some expert answering the question. If you are thinking about doing an interview show, the really important thing to remember is your customers. Do they care about what you're asking, and who you're talking to? So, if you sell fine art, and you're talking to another fine artist, what are the questions your customer has about it? Maybe, they're interested in how they're inspired, but maybe they're not interested in the techniques. Because if you sell fine art, your customers probably aren't other fine artists, they are people who buy art. So you want to make sure that you're asking questions and you're talking to people who your customers are going to be interested in. So the sample we have is from my friend Jolie, who you'll meet later. She has a show called, "The Wooly Hub", where she intervie...

ws other people in the fiber art world, because she teaches and talks to fiber artists. So, in this sample, this is Jolie, this is Stacy Trock, who also teaches on "Creative Live". She has an upcoming class you should totally take. They're just, what I want you to keep in mind as we watch this clip, which I'll play in a second is how casual they are, and how imperfect they are, and I say that with love. They haven't edited it down so it's like an MPR show or a PBS show. It's very casual, it's very chatty. This video is super popular, and they both have audiences who love to see this kind of interaction. It relaxes me, like knitting is the thing I do to relax, but the thing that I love is business. Yeah, and I think that's okay. Like I said, this is the first time I've had paid, normal employment with a company, and someone said, it's okay to not, we were talking about the distinction between being an entrepreneur and freelancing, and I think there's this halo around being an Okay, so that was just a really quick little clip, to show you their interaction. I picked that clip because it wasn't a straightup interview in the style of cable news. They weren't like, "And here's my question, Bob", and Bob is like, "And here's my perfect answer". Instead it was a conversation, she was just saying, "I do this, and what do you think about that?", "Oh yeah, totally, me too." So, when I say interview I don't want you to think it has to be like, "And here's my question, and here's my next question.", because that tends to be kind of boring and dry. Those interview shows do best when they're conversational. "Yeah, I think this, how have you found that in your business? Ooo, I agree, I feel like this also." That conversation is what people really love to see because we don't get to see it. You don't get to see two professionals in your field, just chatting like that, so when you have that it lets people think that they're kind of behind the scenes, and the more you can do that and just show the conversations your're naturally having, either with your peers or with your clients, the better it's gonna be. So, you might want to think about doing an interview show if what you'd really like to do is build relationships in a new field, because this isn't focused on your audience, this is focused on the people you're interviewing. If you interview tons of people that have big audiences, you're gonna be building relationships with them. So if you were doing something like trying to break into a new field, and you needed to know certain gatekeepers, a really excellent way to do that is to interview them. And also you're gonna reach an audience, because they're gonna share that interview, hopefully, with their audience. So you see a lot of podcasts go right to the top of the charts, because they interview big people. So, they interview Oprah, and Brenae Brown, and all these best selling authors, because then their audience, the best selling authors' audience comes to your show and watches it. Now that's not a very sustainable way to build an audience, because those people are really hard to get to, and also your audience might not care. Like we said, you want to talk to people who your audience wants to hear you talk to, but if you want to build an audience reaching out to people who have already established an audience, is one way of doing that. Also, it's best, if your audience wants to learn from experts. So, if you're talking to people about learning to do something, so if you're selling your marketing services, you might talk to other people, who are gonna talk about different aspects of marketing. Who aren't necessarily gonna teach them what you sell, but are gonna get them ready to buy what you sell, or if you were doing craft tutorials, you might want to talk to experts in that field, other stampers and scrapbookers, they might want to see that interview. Also, if you have clients or customers who have really interesting stories or transformations, like as a personal trainer, you might want to feature the customer who's worked with you, I guess you'd call them a client, who's worked with you and says, "This was my experience with working with you." Now, if that's the entire interview that's gonna be kind of boring and seem like a commercial, but you can ask them, "What were your fears, and what did you learn, and how did you move forward, and what was it like to work with me?", all of those together make a really interesting interview. What I would like to see is more interview shows focused on normal people, as opposed to the big authors, because that's gonna be something that people always wonder, what do people in that industry, what do they do when they get together? Like when two fine artists are together at a show, what are they talking about when they're bored in between customers. People love to see that behind the scenes stuff. It makes them feel like they're in your world, and then that builds trust, and that builds authority, because you're the person who's connecting them to all these other people.

Class Description

In Grow Your Business with YouTube you'll learn how video can take your business to a new level! You’ll learn how to find time to make videos that are fun, easy, and effective at selling your products. We will focus on generating content ideas, and you'll learn how to use those videos to find brand-new customers (and keep your current customers coming back). You'll walk away from this class with a customized plan for making videos that will grow your business and increase sales.

Use YouTube to:

  • Build trust with your audience
  • Regularly talk about your business and products in a friendly "behind the scenes way"
  • Demonstrate your subject matter knowledge

We Will cover:

  • How to replicate your customer experience online (mood, brand, attitude)
  • Building community by being yourself
  • How video fits in your brand and business
  • Planning content (lots of idea generation) Including short samples!
  • How to be yourself and comfortable on camera

Reviews

Linda E
 

Tara Swiger was amazing! Clear, concise and so informative. I loved this course! I am so inspired to get going with my You Tube videos and feel confident with her plan of actions. Thank you Creative Live.

Jennie Powell
 

Tara made so many excellent points and has made me have a long list of actionable points to help to grow my YouTube presence! She has such a clarity of expression and a friendly manner that I find very easy to learn from.

Lori Rochino
 

Great video, lots of notes were taken as I got a lot of takeaways to use for my new Youtube channel. Thanks, Tara for a great class!