Skip to main content

Getting the Right Shot

Lesson 17 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

Getting the Right Shot

Lesson 17 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

buy this class

$00

$00
Sale Ends Soon!

starting under

$13/month*

Unlock this classplus 2000+ more >

Lesson Info

17. Getting the Right Shot

Next Lesson: Choose a Background

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1 Introduction

1

Welcome to the Class

02:12
2

What Makes a Great Video

03:17
3

What Type of Video Should You Make

02:47

Chapter 2: Pre-production

4

Come up with a Great Video Ideas

05:05
5

Plan Your Video

03:30
6

The Pre-production Checklist

04:04

Chapter 3 Equipment - Our Suggestions for Getting Started

7

Does Equipment Matter

01:34
8

Our Recommended Cameras

06:00
9

Our Recommended Audio Equipment

04:37
10

Our Recommended Lighting Equipment

01:47
11

Our Recommended Editing Equipment

02:11
12

Our Recommended Drone Equipment

05:35
13

Quiz: Chapter 3

Chapter 4:Cinematography Basics

14

Exposing Your Shots

05:25
15

Compose Your Shots

04:25
16

Filming Yourself

01:09
17

Getting the Right Shot

03:43
18

Choose a Background

02:32
19

My Office Video Setup

02:54
20

Quiz: Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Tips for Shooting with Different Cameras

21

Exposing with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

06:31
22

Focus with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

02:35
23

Stabilize Your Shots

02:57
24

Know Your Lenses

03:18
25

Shoot with Your Smartphone

05:10
26

Shoot with Your Webcam

05:49
27

Record Great Screencast Videos

04:20
28

Tips for Better Drone Shots

04:06
29

Types of Drone Shots

01:43
30

Quiz: Chapter 5

Chapter 6: Audio Recording and Microphones

31

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

03:14
32

Record Better Audio in Any Environment

01:27
33

How to Use a Lavalier Microphone

02:47
34

How to Use a Shotgun Microphone

00:55
35

How to Record Audio with Your Computer

01:27
36

Quiz: Chapter 6

Chapter 7: Video Lighting

37

Why We Light

01:03
38

Use Natural Light

04:14
39

The 3-point Video Lighting Setup

07:26
40

Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Editing Better Videos

41

Intro to Editing

02:15
42

The Post-production Process

07:50
43

Craft a Story with Editing

05:21
44

Improve Your Audio with Editing

06:34
45

Find and Add Music

05:12
46

Design Clean and Professional Titles

03:15
47

Increase Video Engagement with Calls to Action

01:29
48

Quiz: Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Get More Views - Publishing Your Video Online

49

Export the Best Quality Video for Online

02:54
50

Tips for Posting Online

05:28
51

Grow Your Youtube Channel

04:41
52

Quiz: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Case Studies: Real-world Filmmaking

53

Case Study - Corporate Promo Videos with Ghirardelli Chocolate

08:54
54

Case Study - Event Videography with Major Lazer

08:39
55

Case Study - Documentary Films with Phil

14:24
56

Case Study - Shooting By Yourself

15:32
57

Case Study - Wedding Videography

08:37
58

Case Study - Phil's Livestream Setup

04:23

Chapter 11: Conclusion

59

Thank You

00:59

Final Quiz

60

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

Getting the Right Shot

we're gonna be talking about what shots it takes to tell your story and really thinking about both beforehand and while shooting, you know, what what do I need to get to tell my story? What is critical for me as a video maker to share what I want to share. And this is both uh you know, getting your your main interviewer, you know, this type of stuff to getting the inserts, getting the shots that help tell the story further beyond just seeing someone talking. So one important thing to think about is your a role versus your b role. Your role is really the meat of your story. It's where you're going to get your narration or your interviewer talking. It's the sort of the thing that's gonna form your entire story. Your B roll is just as important though. These are the shots that you're going to put over your interviewer or over your voiceover. This is the things that really show and and bring to life your character, your subject. So for example, we worked on this documentary and we spent th...

e morning getting to talk with the subject, learning about his life, uh seeing some things around his house, but we really just spent the time to talk to him and and sort of learn what he was all about from there. We did get some shots in the house, but we went out with him into into the world and and and got shots with him on the streets, got him doing actions, got, you know, different stuff that really helped tell his story. What was really helpful though was getting this interview first because we knew what type of shots we needed to get later in the day. So in this instance are april was the interview shot. It's what we got sitting with our subject and talking to him. Our B roll then was all the other footage. It's important to know what is said in the april and then getting the B roll that matches that feeling in matches that sentiment. This can be really critical to telling your story, be real in a way brings to life your april whenever I go out on events or I'm shooting with Major Lazer a lot of the times, it's just me shooting and so I'll go and I'll think, okay, I need to go get a wide shot of the crowd. I need to get these specific shots and I know before even thinking about the edit really that these are the shots that will help tell this story. These are the shots that I want to get to tell this and this takes a lot of practice because each show I do, it's something different. I have a different style, a different idea of how I want to approach it. Sometimes. I only want to use close ups other times. I only want to use wide shots. Uh, that being said, having a second camera, having a third camera can make a massive difference because I can have someone always getting a wide shot, I can someone getting all the close ups and I can myself be getting those magic moments that maybe I would miss because I was getting that other coverage. So next time you're going into a shoot, maybe do some research, go and look at other videos online and don't just watch it. Don't just enjoy it. Actually look at each shot. Think of, okay if I'm going into this, I want to get this wide shot and I want to tell it all from this perspective. It's something to think about. And don't get me wrong, there's plenty of times everything changes and what you thought you could do is radically different. But at least you have some idea of what you want to get going into it. I think the greatest thing you can do to learn more about, you know, what shots you need and what shots you want to get is just to watch films. Go see how people cover scenes and really analyze it. Look at their wide shots to their mediums through their close ups. And it's a great way to see how other directors have developed a style and especially watching their first film to their last film. You can see their takes on filmmaking and through that. You can decide what type of filmmaker you want to be

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Using Fiverr to get work
Drive Download

Ratings and Reviews

seyi ope
 

i love the way they teach the course. its very understandable

Student Work

RELATED ARTICLES

RELATED ARTICLES