Advanced Lighting for Adventure Photography

 

Advanced Lighting for Adventure Photography

 

Lesson Info

Pre-production and Location Scouting for Rock Climbing

Rock climbing shoot at Smith Rock we did three or four weeks ago. There was a lot of thought-- So there's all kinds of preproduction meetings that happen between the folks at Red Bull Photography, the people at CreativeLive, myself. I tend to like to challenge myself, so I didn't pick a location that was close to my house, which may or may not have been smart, but it was fun. It made it harder on me, but... I shot climbing for so long, and I still shoot a lot of rock climbing and mountaineering and stuff. I'd never been to Smith Rocks before. I'd never been to Bend, Oregon but I knew it was a cool place. I have some good friends that live there. And I thought, you know it'd be fun to go somewhere new and exciting. And I knew Smith Rock was there, it's one of the few crags in the United States that I hadn't been to. And I knew of this climb, and I knew of a few other climbs that would probably work, so I did some research before our conference calls, and looked at a whole bunch of topo ...

maps of the area and I had the climbing guidebook for the area so I could look at the... the guidebooks typically show you the rock face, and they actually show you the angle of the ground, so I could see if the ground went up next to certain climbs which means I could stand on the ground and shoot across, or actually place my light on the ground. For this climb, Chain Reaction, which is a difficult climb but it's not by any means the most difficult climb at Smith Rocks. It's an arête that sticks out as you can see. It's a very, super iconic climb. It's been on the picture of Time Magazine and Life Magazine and Newsweek, you name it this climb has been shot for 25 years. It was put up quite a while ago in the 80s. Smith Rock is also a climbing area that has had in the past, some of the hardest climbs in the world, and it still has some of the hardest climbs in the world there. Very famous among climbers. I knew at least then-- typically when I'm shooting climbing one of the things I've found with the lighting is having some part of the cliff that sticks out, as a protrusion, is easier to light than a flat wall. Cause if it's a flat wall... If you stick your flash on the ground, and let's say the wall's over here, you're just going to get the light, we call it a "butt shot" in climbing, cause it's just gonna to be this weird shadow that's on the cliff from behind the climber, and it looks very odd. For me, I prefer to get the light either on par with the climber or above the climber, which, if we're on a flat wall, means I need to put up a climber holding my strobe so it streaks across like that ice climbing image across the climb, which is still kind of the "alien abduction" lighting, but it's a little more natural than being on the ground and putting some strange light on the flat wall. So that's why I picked this climb, because I knew we could light it in a certain way, and I knew the flash could be on the ground and we wouldn't have to play too many games. As you can tell, I'd never been to the area, but I'd done so much research online that I knew we could pull it off. I knew that we could position the flash within 60 to 100 feet, and I had a feeling there were other climbs nearby that we could do similar stuff with. And we had a climber in Kai and Ian, who could cruise this thing all day long without even... They could do this climb blindfolded cause they're so strong. This climb is technically 5.12c, I won't go into all the how that is established, but the hardest climbs in the world are like 5.15a, so that's 12 levels higher than this climb. Even thought I probably couldn't climb that climb, for them this is like walking down the sidewalk, which is key. In all of this adventure sports stuff, the athlete is such a huge part of the image, and what they can do is... I can basically throw a stick at the cliff and they can probably climb it, if they're that strong, which is great for me cause it gives me all options. If you're using a climber who's not as strong, you may only be able to do this route, that route, and that route, which really limits your options. Also, look at the background. It's a beautiful area. It's super jagged as you'll see in the video we're going to show in just a bit, so it's a stunning background. Whenever I'm shooting these adventure sports, the location is as important as the athlete. In some ways, photographically it's almost more important than the athlete depending on what you're shooting. If you have a world-class wingsuit flyer, than they're definitely the important part of that image, but if I'm going to create a figure in a landscape, than that landscape better be epic. There's a lot of thought that went into the location, seeing the background, and plus I'd seen hundreds of pictures of this, so it's like taking a classic image and changing the lighting and crafting it in a totaling different way to create a new, classic version of that image. Which is exciting. The funny thing is when I show this to Red Bull and CreativeLive they googled it and two pictures came up and they were like, "Oh yeah. That's great. We love that." When you've picked the amazing landscape, you get not only your client excited, yourself excited, but also the athlete excited. Kai had never been here. He's a gym climber who's been on the world cup circuit, climbing plastic, he's climbed outdoors, and has climbed very hard outdoors, but he had never been to Smith Rock. So for him, he got to come experience a place he's always wanted to climb at, and we not only brought him here, but he got to get on one of the most classic routes ever. Even though it's way below his level, in terms of his hardest climbs, it's still fun to get on the old classics. I mean, just look at the thing, it looks... so cool.

Class Description

How do you freeze action, create motion blur and showcase the strength and style of athletes? When you introduce artificial light into your adventure photography, the opportunities are endless! It’s easier than it looks, and once you master the technical aspects, lighting on location can unlock tremendous opportunity for capturing portraits and action.

Red Bull Photographer, Michael Clark, joins CreativeLive to break down the barriers that are keeping you from letting your photography stand out. In this course, he’ll cover the basics of gear, incorporating flash, finding unique perspective and so much more.

Through demonstrations in the field, Michael will work with incredible athletes in a variety of lighting scenarios to show how to capture the heart of a sport and the spirit of an athlete. If you’re looking to make your mark in the world of action or sports photography, this course is a necessity in making your work compete with the best in the industry.

Michael will cover everything:

  • Location Scouting for your camera and your lights
  • Packing and gear tips for various locations
  • Scouting the best point of view to capture action
  • Safety and considerations for working with athletes
  • Strobes vs. Speedlights
  • When to use High Speed Sync, Hi-Sync (HS) or Leaf Shutters with your flash
  • Getting into the business of adventure photography
  • Creating tension in your photos

Michael will be working with professional athletes like trail runner Dylan Bowman, cyclist Tim Johnson, and incredible rock climbers to give you a rare and one-of-a-kind look into the world of adventure photography.

Submit your work to the Student Gallery for a chance at feedback from two of the best adventure photographers in the world, Michael Clark, and Chase Jarvis.