Finding, Defining, and Marketing Your Photographic Style

 

Lesson Info

How Style is Applied to your Brand: Collateral

Collateral, this is a big one. Keep it with your words. My collateral, obviously we have collateral for lots of different things in the studio. I just brought a couple of pieces with me. But it all has the same feeling. Airy, clean, organic, serene, hope, authentic, you still get those feelings every time you look at my collateral. It all looks like it's come from the same company, even this is our Bijou Baby line, so the baby plan. This is our little welcome card when people come to the studio, we welcome them with a hand-signed card by all of us at the studio. And we mail it to them as snail mail. So that's when they book, this is the first thing they get in the mail from us. And it comes in a craft envelope, you know what I'm talking about, the brown craft envelope. And then we hand write their name on the front in very pretty handwriting. And put a love stamp on it, the stamp is just as important as the card. We have a thank you card at the very end of the process, still luxurious,...

and it just says thank you on the front, opens up and it says, we appreciate you. And we write a handwritten note on the inside and send that to them about three to four weeks after they've seen product delivery, so not two days after, but like, four weeks after. We want the time to go by because we want them to know we were still thinking about them and not just this obligatory systemized thing we do, two days after they get their product. We want it to seem like, no, we were thinking about you and we wanna make sure everything's cool and that you don't need any help with printing your images. And we loved having you and we're thinking about you, we miss you. So all of these things send branding messages. We also, like our portrait-care card and digital file release card, all this stuff, you can see it all has the same feeling. So it can look different but still have the same feeling. Your collateral is so critical to what you do and it can be digital or analog collateral. This is our partnership kit that we give to vendors that we wanna partner with. So when I'm trying to pitch a display or a trade partnership or a gift card partnership with a baby store, whatever it may be, I meet with the owner, give them this kit, tell them how it benefits them, how it benefits us, tit for tat, some people get it and wanna partner with you, some people, small businesses are idiots and they have no idea and they think you're trying to steal their business and you just walk away and they're not your marketing partner. They're not your client, you know what I'm saying? So you do have to kind of weed out some people when you do those kinds of partnerships. But having good marketing collateral, the message it sends is, number one, my brand and style. But number two, it sends a message that, hey, we know what we're doing when it comes to marketing and we want you, not can I be with you? We want you. There's a big difference. This is our IPS brochure, like, this is what the experience is gonna be like. It's great if you're switching to IPS. You know what IPS is? In-person sales. Just to talk about the advantages and disadvantages of IPS, how it's gonna benefit. But same thing, the brochure looks the same. This is our full-page ad we place in the Bed and Nest which is a baby and parenting magazine, again, same feeling. Your digital media needs to look like your handheld collateral. Your Facebook profile should all be consistent. They should look like they're from the same studio. You don't want your Twitter to be one thing, your Instagram to be another, and your Facebook to be another. It's disjointed. If you put all of your social media pages up on one computer screen, would they look like they're from the same company? Consistency. Same with your website. And this is my website, there's nothin' much to it, it's pretty clean. It's just a bunch of images and white and a few graphics here and there. It's very simple because I want the work and the style of the work to stand out, not the website design. To me, I'd rather have the images come forward. But that again is a stylized thing. So you need to kinda figure out what you love as a business owner and what message you wanna send and what words resonate with you, both feeling words and visual words. Again, back to that visual presence.


How can you work successfully (and profitably) as an artist in a crowded, over-saturated market? You have to make your work and your brand stand out by creating your art from a deeply authentic place that is only YOU and yours alone. In other words, you must define your STYLE. By standing out uniquely, you can attract the kind of client who is willing to compensate you appropriately for what you bring to the table.

Join master business and photography educator, Julia Kelleher, for a class on finding, defining and applying your style to your work and your brand.

In this class you’ll discover how to:

  • Identify your style as an artist intentionally rather than by accident
  • Incorporate your style into your brand
  • Use your style to help gain financial benefits
Learn how an undeviating style can bring in your ideal client, make you stand out in a crowd, command top dollar and keep your competition at arms length.

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • Wow wow wow, as an artist on a beginner's stage this was an amazing presentation. Julia is a pro on teaching the psychology of the artist within ourselves. I will follow her from now on and start putting in practice her step by step techniques on finding my style as an artist. Thank you Creativelive and Thank You Julia, you are amazing
  • This course is amazeballs. Love love love love love love love. Just buy it. :)
  • Wow - this may be my favorite Julia Kelleher class (and I own several). So much of what she talks about hits home with me, really speaking to where I am at in my photography journey and the struggles I grapple with every day. Lots of hard truths - the kind that remind us as to the necessity of good old fashioned hard work (really, really hard work) - the need to be truly technically proficient - the need to experiment - the need to practice every single day - repetition ("wash, rinse, repeat!") - and the need to continue learning all the time. I also really appreciate the fact that Julia touches on the PPA (Professional Photographer's of America) CPP (Certified Professional Photographer) process a bit. I just took my CPP exam and will be working my way through the image submission phase of the CPP process over the course of the next year; so it was nice to hear Julia's thoughts and experience in her own CPP journey. I NEEDED this course. Julia and Creative Live - thank you for bringing this to us. And Julia, thank you for diving deep into the hard realities that we need to hear and know in order to truly grow and evolve artistically and professionally.