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Natural, Realistic Retouching in Photoshop: Photoshop CC

Lesson 4 of 9

Photoshop Settings for Editing

 

Natural, Realistic Retouching in Photoshop: Photoshop CC

Lesson 4 of 9

Photoshop Settings for Editing

 

Lesson Info

Photoshop Settings for Editing

I got to a point where I said, I still want to go to photo shop on this. What? What am I going to do then? So there's a workflow, and this is important that we understand the workflow to get to photo shop when you work inside of light room. If you from light room hit Command e or if you go to you right, click the photograph and say, Edit this in Photoshop Either one. It's going toe open that raw file inside of Photoshop, and when you save it, it's going to return it back toe light room. That way you always have the two photographs next to each other, the raw and the final tiff, or PSD when you are in light room and you go to the preferences. This edit external editing system here in the third menu over and the preferences gives you the opportunity to decide what kind of images you're gonna edit. I prefer to add a tiff image, and the only reason I do is that a tiff is more universal than a PSD. So sometimes like if you open up a tiff and then you want to take it to some kind of ah extra...

editor of some sort. It doesn't read a PST, but it will always read it. If so, to me, that just seems like the most logical thing to use this test. If you want to use the PSD, use the PSD. But I want to show you and really focus in on the settings for editing whether using a tiff or PSD noticed that the color space is pro photo RGB. You need to be in pro photo RGB because you want the largest amount of color possible when you're editing something because once you take an image into photo shop, you're going into a destructive land where you start to mess up the photograph as you work on the photograph and so you don't want the least amount of pixel information, which and color information, which would be the S RGB color space. That's real Tiny s RGB is great for throwing it up on the Web and for sending it to a printer because that's what they use. But that's the dumbed down print on Lee type of version. We don't use that when we're editing photos, so use pro photo RGB and that will give you the most approximate, uh, color information toe, what you're seeing in raw and what you can do in raw. But the reason we do so much of our editing inside of raw and inside of light room is because it's non destructive, and we want to kind of mimic that nondestructive land as close as we can when we goto Photoshopped. The second is that we use 16 bit. We don't use eight bit. If you're editing photographs an eight bit, you are probably seeing banding in your skies. You're probably seeing noisy shadows. You're probably seeing bad transitions between highlights and shadows. You're probably seeing way to contrast the stuff. You're it's. I can probably spot the people who are using eight bit when they're editing the photographs as opposed to 16 bit. It means that you're gonna have to have a faster computer, or you're gonna have to have more RAM or more hard drive space. You're probably gonna have to do have that in orderto work 16 bit all the time, but it's worth it. 16 bit is good file hygiene because of use eight bit, it's gonna break down real fast and I'm gonna be able to see it. Okay. And then, of course, the Resolution 300 Deep ei. That's kind of just a standard resolution. That's where you that's where I put it. You could do to 40 which is more of what a new inkjet wants to see. 300 is what photographic printers generally want to see, so that's just a preference. That's not absolute. Okay, so those are the settings that I'm using when I'm inside of light room in order to go to photo shop, and I want to stack it with the original. Okay, that little button right there. Stack it with the original. That's super helpful because you'll always know where it is. It's on top of the old one, and then you can also customize your settings and tell it I want this to be either image edit. So it'll be image zero zero zero two dash edit Or I can customize it and I can tell it that I want it to just be the file name. So then it will just say image 0002 dot psd or tiff or JPEG or whatever you've sent out. All right, so I love having the file name of the photo shop document, the same as the file name of the raw file. The reason I like doing it that way is that if I edit an image because you know there's a light pole sticking out of someone's head or there's something egregious and I have to go toe Photoshopped to do it. But I don't want the client to see that I had to do that. And so I'll go to photo shop when they come back. It's got the same name and it sits on top of it. Then when I make a proof book or I post them online, they don't see a zero zero zero two dash edit, meaning that I went and edited it. I want them to think that I've never edited anything in my life.

Class Description

So you know how to use Adobe® Photoshop®, but are you overusing the program, creating unrealistic images and more importantly, wasting your time? Join Jared Platt, an industry post-production expert to learn how to use Adobe Photoshop efficiently to create beautiful and realistic retouched images.  


Software Used: Adobe Photoshop CC 2015

Reviews

JIll C.
 

I really enjoy Jared's practical, matter-of-fact teaching style, and I learned a lot in this class about using Lightroom for the majority of edits, and reserving Photoshop for just those edits that can't be done in LR or aren't efficient in LR. He also reiterated the importance of "keeping it natural", particularly with regard to portraits. Very useful course !

user-1c544c
 

Jared is a great presenter. Gets you to think about both your photographic objective as well as the steps to get there. Good hints on both Photoshop retouching and use of Lightroom as part of the process.

Wen Chien Hu