Olympus® OM-D E-M1 Mark II Fast Start

 

Lesson Info

Custom Menu J1-J2

J1, some general utility things. Occasionally the camera can get a hot pixel, which means it's burnt out. And it can do a mapping and it can see where there's problem, and it can kind of clone out that problem. And so hopefully you won't need to use that, but it's there if you need it. Press-and-hold time. Okay, this is another one that, this is like the only camera in the world that I know that has this. It's kind of unique, so I want to show you a little demo of how this works here. And so, let's do an example with exposure compensation on this. And so on the back of the camera, let's zoom in to our subjects. Okay, so there we go. Now, I'm gonna go to the program mode, and let's see, do I have this set right? I guess this doesn't really matter. Okay, so you can see my exposure compensation going back and forth. Okay, well, let's just say I have it set way down here, and I'm a kind of a lazy guy, and I don't want to turn the dial all the way back so that it gets back to zero. The secr...

et shortcut is if I press the OK button and I hold it there for a moment, it automatically kicks back to zero. Now, wait a minute. How long is that moment? That moment is precisely .7 of a second. And if I don't like that time, I can go in to, where are we, we're down here towards the bottom, press-and-hold time, and exposure compensation is at .7. I would like that to only be reset at two seconds. So now, when I do an exposure compensation and I press the OK button, ah, it didn't do anything, because I didn't hold the button down for a full one thousand one, one thousand two. Now it does it. And so it can do this off of a number of different things. So for instance, let's try the focusing points. Okay, the focusing point in the far left has been chosen. I want to get that back to the middle. I'm gonna hit the OK button for how long? Point seven of a second. If you don't like that time, you can go in and you can tweak it. So there's a lot of tweaking you can do to adjust those times. And so all those different options can be set to be longer to reset them back to their normal settings. Level Adjust, another feature I hope you don't need to do anything with. And so this is simply where the levels in the camera that you turn on, if they're not perfect, you can have the camera reset them, essentially. Hopefully you don't need to use that. Touchscreen settings. So for those of you who really don't like the touchscreen, you can just simply turn it off. For those of you who like it, you can leave it turned on. It's turned on by default. Menu Recall is kind of nice. It will recall where you were last at in the menu, and it will go back to that spot. And this can be very handy if you're going in and checking something and then shooting and then coming back to that same mode and turning it off. If you prefer it to reset, I believe it will just go back to the top of the menu, and you can find whatever you were looking for straight from there. And so if you want to go back to that same item, have it on recall. And just in case you're wondering, this camera does not have a My Menu, which is something a lot of other cameras have. It doesn't have a preset one, so I think the recall option here is a very good option to have. Final tab, Battery Settings. And so this one will allow us to dive in and find out some information about the batteries. First up is choosing which battery the camera uses first, or is using. If you have the vertical grip on the camera, you can choose either the vertical grip or the body battery to be working with. Next up is the status. This gives you some very specific data about the serial number of the battery. You might want to check and see which batteries you have. You can see how many pictures you've been taking and the overall condition of the batteries. So these batteries have a lot of information. Aftermarket batteries may not have all that chip information built into it. Backlit LCD. When you are using the backlit LCD, how long do you want that to stay on? One minute is kind of normal. You can extend it or shorten it. That will affect your battery life, depending on what you're doing with the camera. The camera wants to go into a sleep mode, and when it goes into a sleep mode, you're gonna need to touch down on the shutter release to wake the camera up. Normally, it will do it after about five minutes. You can make it a shorter period of time if you want to save battery power. Auto Power Off. This is kind of a deep sleep. This is the comatose mode, and when it goes into a comatose mode, you need to turn the camera off and back on to wake it back up. A simple shutter release is not enough to do it. So it has different levels of a light nap and a more serious nap and then comatose state. The Quick Sleep Mode, that super control panel on the back of the camera will go dim after about, I don't know, it's about 15 seconds or so, just to save battery power, trying to get as much life out of a particular battery. So that's really irritating for somebody who's using it on a regular basis, but if you are trying to save a little bit of battery power, you can leave that turned on. There are a thing called Eye-Fi cards, which will wirelessly transmit to your computer. You'll only see this if you have a Wi-Fi or an Eye-Fi card in your camera, so it's kind of a whole separate deal, but we're not gonna talk too much about it. Completely useless. Have fun looking at this. (laughing)

We know what it’s like to dive right into taking pictures with your new camera. But reading dense technical manuals can be time-consuming and frustrating. Get the most out of your new Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II with this complete step-by-step walkthrough of the camera’s features. 


Join expert photographer John Greengo for a fast-track introduction, and unlock your camera’s full potential. In this fast start class, you’ll learn: 
  • How to use the exposure system
  • How to customize the camera controls for your needs
  • How to use and customize the menu 

John is a CreativeLive veteran instructor and an experienced photographer. He has extensive experience teaching the technical minutiae that makes any camera an effective tool: aperture, ISO, the Rule of Thirds, and the kinds of lenses you’ll need to suit your camera body. This fast start includes a complete breakdown of your camera’s exposure, focus, metering, video and more. John will also explain how to customize the Olympus OM-D E-M1 Mark II settings to work for your style of photography.

 
 
 
 

Reviews

  • This is exactly what I was looking for - I really feel like I'm not able to control my camera, rather than the camera controlling me! :) I really learned a great deal - some of it was a great review, some of it was crucial information that will (hopefully) make me a better photographer. Thanks for a great class, John!!
  • Great and very informative class.... John has done a fabulous job explaining all the simple and intricate details of the very sophisticated EM1 II. Thank you !!!
  • I am enjoying the presentation immensely. My first experience with John's classes and he's excellent. It's a no brainer to buy this for anyone using the Olympus E-M1 mk II. I've been using Olympus OM-D bodies since 2012 when they debuted, and have two E-M1 mk1 bodies and just purchased the mk2 model this week. I thought it would be a simple modest upgrade, easy for me to configure, since I feel I'm pretty adept with the mk 1 settings. But I was wrong. This is way more than an upgrade. It's an entirely different camera in many ways and this class has already saved me time in my configuration planning and trying to understand how I'll use this camera alongside my other Mk1 bodies. Thanks for the class. The timing couldn't have been better in my case!