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Building Out A Set

Lesson 27 from: Symbol Design for Branding

Mitchel Hunt

Building Out A Set

Lesson 27 from: Symbol Design for Branding

Mitchel Hunt

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Lesson Info

27. Building Out A Set

Lesson Info

Building Out A Set

as we mentioned earlier. Sometimes you'll have a symbol that lives within a larger brand identity. To create more symbols or graphics within this identity. You're going to want to consider something called shape. Language, shape. Language refers to common shapes and graphic styles that connect the separate elements of a whole. Let's take our rabbit symbol here. If I were to describe the shape language of this rabbit symbol, I'd say that it's made up of thick lines that have rounded tips. The rabbit seems soft and that's probably because it's made up of a lot of curves. Some of them are very geometric but still imply a little bit of organic shape. The shape of the rabbit never completely closes. You can see at the bottom in the middle of the feet there is a gap. The eye is also the only thing that's filled in. So I've described the general shapes. I see when looking at this rabbit, I wanted to make a symbol that could live above the bar to indicate where you might order drinks. The mart...

ini glass here shares a lot of the shape language. I was just talking about the thick lines, mostly rounded corners, a shape that doesn't quite close and then one piece that is filled in. They all live in the middle of the glass reminds us of the eye on the rabbit. I've also tried to keep the negative space here a little bit roomy, just like I did with the rabbit when I was making this top hat I kept with the same theme of having a thick stroke and one solid filled in shape right there for the feather. When doing the restroom symbol, I wasn't left with much space to use a filled in shape. Everything here is a stroke. I felt that this was okay because these figures don't leave much negative space and so the symbol as a whole feels just as heavy as the ones that have filled in shapes. All of the symbols in this lineup here have the same visual weight and shape language. And I achieved this by setting rules for myself that were based off of the original symbol. I'd also encourage you to think of rules beyond the drawings. For instance, maybe the extra symbols always appear at roughly two thirds the height of the brand mark like they do here. Or maybe they always appear at a certain distance from typography. All of these guidelines and rules that you set for your system will work to make your symbol look more like part of an identity as opposed to just being placed next to the right typeface.

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