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Pairing With Type

Lesson 28 from: Symbol Design for Branding

Mitchel Hunt

Pairing With Type

Lesson 28 from: Symbol Design for Branding

Mitchel Hunt

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Lesson Info

28. Pairing With Type

Lesson Info

Pairing With Type

after tightening up some of my vectors, I chose these three symbols as my finalists for pictorial, abstract and monogram. The next step was picking an appropriate typeface When picking a typeface, you should once again consider the shape language of your symbol. The lines that make up My Rabbit are all pretty uniforms. So I knew I had a decision to make either I pick a typeface that has uniform lines to keep everything in line or I pick one that has thicker and thinner strokes to add variation. Both worked just fine. But when I consider my client the mission statement and the tone, I sat with my keywords, I felt that the second option here was the most appropriate. Always ask yourself if your decision is bringing you closer to or further away from the brand's key concepts. Since this symbol was more complex, I knew that I wanted the typeface to feel just as heavy and dense. I also knew that the relationship between the word mark and the symbol needed to be scaled just right. Otherwise ...

one of them could get lost. When the brand mark is scaled down. In this version, I played with making the symbol the same height as all of the letter forms and the second. I made the symbol of the focal point and strength. The word mark smaller. The third one sort of levels the two out in terms of visual hierarchy. Actually really liked the first one the most visually. But the sensible option really is the third with the third solution, I'm able to keep the typeface in the symbol at their most legible. Always keep legibility at the forefront. You'll be much happier when you see your mark used across the brand identity. Since this symbolism monogram, I had to be sensitive to the typeface that I'm already using. There's a good rule of thumb, designers usually avoid using more than two typefaces in one brand mark so to maintain consistency. I tried the same typeface in the word mark here, but this particular typeface is very overwhelming to begin with and the shape languages really made that much more intense by the frame that I've put around the edge of the monogram. I felt that the brand needed some breathing room and brought in this typeface instead of lower case. I used all caps and I picked a typeface that has wide letter forms to further differentiate from the monogram. By thinking through my decision like this, I can envision a lot more variation and thoughtful graphics associated with the brand that aren't just using the same angular shapes over and over again. Think about how a word mark might pair. Well with some of the symbols you've created in this class, don't be afraid to make alterations to the letter forms or even invent your own. Now that you have an understanding of where to start

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