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Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 11 of 17

360 Studio Shooting Demo

 

Intro to VR & 360 Live-Action Photography and Video

Lesson 11 of 17

360 Studio Shooting Demo

 

Lesson Info

360 Studio Shooting Demo

So what we're doing here is I've got the phone. That's the act for this foot for this camera. And we have that phone on this screen. It's very little over there, but I'm sure the studio can cut to the full screen version. And what you can see is how I walk around the camera as a live monitor, right? So live. It's watching me walk around the room, Come over here. And I could still see me everywhere I go. Right. So now we can understand our audiences perspective, and just real quickly, I'm gonna change the view so you can see kind of what it would look like as a fish eye. You can see what it would look like is doubled up, right? Left our from behind and from in front. Um, So there's our crew. Say hi, crew. Okay. And I'm gonna keep changing the perspective. Here we go. So now we're back where it's all stitched together, live stitched together, Okay. And we're gonna talk about camera placement. So this is all set up. I'm just gonna stay in that up. And let's say we wanted our audience to b...

e a fly on the wall, right? Our audience is someone that's watching a conversation happen, and that conversation is happening at this table over here. So I'm gonna do is put this camera right there. We're gonna get some amazing feedback. Probably visual feedback here. Let's all try to get that. Um, but the lesson here is around having a conversation at the table and our perspective, the audiences perspective. As a filmmaker, I want the audience, the audience to be watching from afar. Sort of 1/3 person view of a conversation. So can I get someone toe come join me at the table? All right. This is Chris from CREATIVELIVE. He's going to come join me, and we're gonna be having a conversation. Now. Our audiences perspective is 1/3 person in the room, they're not at the table, they're not part of the conversation. But there in the space, um, and sometimes that's compelling. Sometimes that's what the director wants the audience to feel like that they are a member of this space. Now, if we bring this camera closer to us, we put it right here. All of a sudden, our audience feels like they're in the conversation with us. So take a look at the camera and I'll look at the camera and we're gonna talk to the camera as if you know, So that blue's clues like I'm gonna ask Question What do you think? You know? And it just wait. And as an audience member, they're gonna be inside of that. They're gonna be inside of this camera looking out. That's their perspective. They have. And it's as if someone asked them a question. And it's as if they're standing up with us having a discussion. Now. One thing that often happens is people have a tendency to want to put the camera right in the middle of the table. Let's see what happens if we do that. People have a tendency to want to put the camera in the middle of the action. And so we're just gonna sort of carefully position this appear And, um so this standard a little too told. But let's say we had our desk size stand and we put we put our camera right on the table. Now all of a sudden, that camera, that person, your audiences perspective is between the two of us as we talk Chris and And what that does is it breaks the illusion that they are actually in the room with us. Because when that when that audience ever looks down, even just in the peripheral vision sees that they are there is a table below them. Um, all of a sudden they're no longer in an experience there watching and experience, right? The illusion is broken. So having the camera on Lee be in a position where human can be actually furthers the trick on audience, right? It allows the audience toe, forget themselves, forget their own name, their own friends and their own problems and all the Facebook posts that you're going by. You forget all of that, and all they do is feel like they are part of the scene. Um, so let's raise this back up to a person height. Now, another thing that I like to do is here. Chris, we take a seat in that chair there. Okay, so Chris is, Let's say, Chris is are sort of main character is having conversation with with our audience member. And so he's telling you turned this way a bit, and he's telling the audience member what's going on and he's sort of explaining something. Now. At the moment, our audience member is standing up pipe, Right says I line height and he's gonna be And our audience member is looking at Chris and Chris is sitting down now. That's fine. But imagine a world where you're talking to someone and you're standing and they're sitting and that conversation goes on for Well, at some point, it feels awkward. And you feel like maybe I should be sitting Should I said I sit. So are we gonna keep talking? Should I garbage here? And so all of a sudden, can I get a chair? Oh, actually, here's one, um so all of a sudden, instead of just having a loan camera, what if we placed a chair right here and we put our camera on the chair? All right. And so and this isn't going to start a great stand for this, but you kind of get the idea. That is, if we can make it for our year, we're gonna do it. Okay, So now, now our audience is sitting with Chris, right? And it's a little tall in this instance just because of the stand, But but the idea is that you want to really allow your audience to have the perspective of a realistic person in a really situation. If this camera was on a drone and it was sort of hovering above that ammunition sort of perspective, then the audience feels like you're watching a promotion. You're watching a film about something. No human can have that perspective, right? And so, although it can engender empathy, although it can, you can get a new perspective. You can see how big the slums are. You can see how bad the trash problem is. You can see how beautiful the park is from way above. But that's doesn't make you feel like you've been to the park. It makes you feel like you've seen the park from above, right? And so those air different feelings. That's a different version of an experience. Having an experience where you're actually the first person were actually a human inside that setting. That's an experience that happens to you. That's an experience that you're part of, and so that's really where I think VR has a big opportunity to be dramatic, to be powerful, to be effective. And so um so let's back up a little bit this time. Let's lose the chairs and we're gonna have Kate, Could you join me over? Here s So what we're gonna do is gonna bring this back up toe person height. So this time, what we're gonna do, um, is have a conversation around blocking. Okay, so here, stand up. And let's say you guys are the two friends in the movie, and you're both standing kind of there by the television at the monitor. So stand closer together. So they're having conversation. It looks great. Our audiences maybe like, kind of at the table part kind of in and also a little out of the conversation. Now, as the director, you could see I'm here in the back, but you can see me. If the audience turnaround, they'd be able to see me, so I have to go hide. So I'm gonna hide over here behind the crew. Okay, so now they're gonna go on, and I'm gonna say action from way back here and they're gonna talk and talk and talk, right? And eventually Kate's going to say, All right, See you later, Chris. She's gonna wave and she's gonna She's gonna walk out the door now I haven't set up where the seam of the camera. Um, right the edge of the camera scene. Let's see if we can get a good one. So let's use this one. So she's going across this scene and we're gonna see what happens when someone crosses this. Seem right here. See how my arm disappears. Well, if we're where Kate is that distance from the camera. Kate, go ahead and try to walk out the door. Look at that. No, seem was way saw. No seen. Okay, so let's try it again. Go ahead and walk again. See, My body got gets lost in the scene, but she did totally fine. That happens because I'm really close to the camera. That seems a really dramatic when you're close to the camera. So about proximity to the camera. So Kate is far enough away that when she crosses the seem line, it's not being noticed so that you don't notice that. Seem that stitch, Kate, You know, let's have both you guys move forward a little bit closer to the camera even more great. Okay, now say goodbye and then walked to the door slowly All right, all right. We got you and I saw the scene. All right, Back up, back up. Your and again cross that line. Okay, Now come closer to the camera and cross that line again. Closer to the camera. Okay, Cross the line again. Boom. All right, let's stand right in the line. We stand right in the line of the between the two lenses. Ah, a little bit. This way. A little bit more. All right. See? There goes Kate. Now it's starting to adjust and compensate for it. It's got a little algorithm, and they're trying to, like, figure out where the stitches are. But in general, when people cross and they're really close to the camera and across that scene, the audience can see the line. So we want to do Do you want to think about, um, choreographing the movement through the seams, choreographing the movement around the camera to account for this limitation? This is just a limitation of er, so if you guys take a step back great and maybe even Kate. So we'll stay where we are going to say goodbye, but you're gonna walk further, kind of like arch out away from the camera as you walked toward the door and just go slowly and we'll be able to see you cross the seeming We won't see that artifact. All right, so say goodbye and slowly arch your way out. Great. So she crossed the scene. But the audience is none the wiser because she was far enough from the from the camera. Um, now, another thing. Thank you, Kate, by the way. And thank you, Chris. I think I think we're good.

Class Description

Imagine a world where you can create a product for your client where they are immersed in a memory or place; a bride & groom that are able to relive the feeling of their first kiss, a real estate agent that can place clients in their virtual home, a journalist that can transport a viewer in a small village in a foreign country. That world is here, and it’s growing quickly. 


360 Live-Action is a form of photography and videography that allows the viewer to see an entire world. With social channels like Facebook and YouTube adopting ways to publish this medium, the creative world has exploded with new opportunities to share new immersive stories. 

Barry Pousman has been playing with virtual reality for years. His stories and media have been used by such organizations as the U.N. and Google to evoke empathy in viewers with the hope of creating a positive behavioral change. In this course, Barry will introduce you to the world of possibilities created by 360 and VR.
You’ll learn:

  • What exactly VR and 360 Live-Action are and the history behind each of them
  • How you can get started in photography and videography to create stories in 360 Live-Action
  • How to develop, plan, shoot, and stitch together a story in 360 Live-Action
  • How you can enter the market place and participate in the growing world of VR and 360 

Reviews

user-5f6365
 

Great content! Great overview on storytelling and an intro to 360.